Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation:What is it? How will it work? What are the ways to engage?      Br...
Outcomes of Busan
Busan: a turning point for development co-operation   The Busan Partnership for Effective   Development Cooperation    – A...
HLF-4: SHARED PRINCIPLES AND DIFFERENTIATED                             COMMITMENTS          Building           Blocks    ...
The Global Partnership for Effective    Development Co-operation
The road ahead – partnering for progresstowards and beyond the MDGs• Country-level focus – agree on frameworks  based on n...
The mandate of the Global Partnership               Core Functions• Maintain and strengthen political momentum  for more e...
LIGHT GLOBAL STRUCTURE                    MINISTERIAL LEVEL MEETING (MLM)                                   Every 18-24 mo...
Composition of the Steering Committee                          CHAIRS              Recipient            ProviderRecipient ...
But the Global Partnership is much more than Ministerial          meetings and a steering committee…        It’s about del...
Monitoring the implementation   of Busan commitments
A country focussed – globally light approach                  COUNTRY LEVEL FRAMEWORKS                    Own indicators a...
The Busan global monitoring framework• The best possible compromise: political focus,  selectivity, grounded in existing p...
Why a global monitoring framework?                              SERVE AS A     SUPPORTS              REFERENCE POINT  ACCO...
Global indicators                          Thematic                                                             Indicator1...
Global Indicators: Info to be provided by countries                          Thematic                                     ...
Approach to global monitoring• Global progress reports produced to inform ministerial-level  meetings• No more centrally m...
Country level monitoring• Essential to make the Busan commitments  real, as delivery is at the country level.• Led by deve...
Joint OECD/UNDP support to the        Global Partnership
Scope for joint OECD-UNDP support• Provide a light global secretariat function• Develop and implement a global monitoring ...
Support on the implementation of country-level  partnership and accountability frameworks        UNDP Country programs: Pr...
Next steps …        End July:                      End 2012: Nomination of co-chairs        Operational guidance and and S...
Thank you…
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Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation -

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  • The Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation, a new global partnership that is broader and more inclusive than ever before:global development agenda,it will need to address the impact and role of aid in the broader development context. Responding to new challenges, actors, approaches…Recognising the role of aid as contributor and catalyst for development results includes ways of leveraging aid for other sources of development finance: domestic taxation, blending ODA with other public and private sources, non-DAC providers of development finance, International Climate Finance and other innovative financing.A wide-range of development actors, including donor countries, low-income and middle-income countries, emerging economies, civil society organisations, multilateral organisations, parliaments, and the private sector.Combining forces from all development partners, committed to providing diverse sources of finance, knowledge and expertise to promote more effective development.Reaffirmation of the commitment to Paris/Accra principles, withpartners that signed up to Paris and Accra agreeing to intensify their efforts to implement their respective commitments in full, and agreeing to more specific commitments to reinforce Paris/Accra commitments with specific deadlines (e.g. use of country systems, aid untying, predictability, transparency, gender equality)Sharedprinciples, differentiatedcommitments: South-South partners will adhere to the principles, commitments and actions set out in the outcome document in Busan on a voluntary basisShared principles: Ownership of development priorities by developing countriesFocus on results (impact on eradicating poverty and reducing inequality, sustainable development, and on enhancing developing countries’ capacitiesInclusive development partnershipsTransparency and accountability
  • Busan – and our deliberations since then – emphasise the “country focused” and globally “light” nature of implementation and monitoring efforts. The Busan agreement places a greater emphasis on monitoring progress towards more effective development co-operation at the country level, in ways that fit with national systems, and are relevant to country contexts and priorities. Some of the countries represented here (Cambodia, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania...) have existing models that serve as potential examples of how this could be doneOne of the key demands from developing countries was that these country-level monitoring efforts should be complemented by a limited number of quantitative global indicators. Their logic is that by aggregating performance across countries, it is possible to offer a snapshot of global progress and challenges that can inform global political dialogue. The 78 developing countries that participated in the last Survey on Monitoring the Paris Declaration will have a good understanding of the opportunities that this approach presents, as well as the need to manage the burden of monitoring efforts carefully.
  • Thecurrent set of global indicators and targets:5 new indicators: Use of country resultsframeworksEnablingenvironment for civil societyEngagement of privatesectorTransparencyGenderequality and women’sempowerment5 indicatorstaken or drawingfrom the Paris Declarationindicators:PredictabilityAid on budgetUse of PFM and procurementsystemsMutualaccountabilityAiduntying
  • 6 out of the 10 global indicatorswillrely on country-level data collection:Use of country resultsframeworksPredictabilityAid on budgetMutualaccountabilityGenderUse of PFM/procurementsystems
  • Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation -

    1. 1. Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation:What is it? How will it work? What are the ways to engage? Brenda Killen Aid Quality and Architecture Division Development Co-operation Directorate, OECD
    2. 2. Outcomes of Busan
    3. 3. Busan: a turning point for development co-operation The Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation – A shift from aid to development effectiveness – Combining forces from all development partners – Reaffirmation of the commitment to Paris/Accra principles – Shared principles, differential commitments – Ownership–results–accountability “nexus” as a priority
    4. 4. HLF-4: SHARED PRINCIPLES AND DIFFERENTIATED COMMITMENTS Building Blocks Core Busan Commitments Common principles
    5. 5. The Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation
    6. 6. The road ahead – partnering for progresstowards and beyond the MDGs• Country-level focus – agree on frameworks based on national needs and priorities• At the global level: – Accountability: a selective and relevant set of indicators and targets to monitor progress – High-level political support: a Global Partnership for Effective Development (backed by a joint OECD/UNDP support team)
    7. 7. The mandate of the Global Partnership Core Functions• Maintain and strengthen political momentum for more effective development co-operation;• Ensure accountability for implementing Busan commitments;• Facilitate knowledge exchange and sharing of lessons learned; and• Support implementation of Busan commitments at the country level.
    8. 8. LIGHT GLOBAL STRUCTURE MINISTERIAL LEVEL MEETING (MLM) Every 18-24 months, focus on: •Reviewing progress •Ensuring political accountability; •Addressing key issues •Sharing experiences •Exploring emerging opportunities Steering Committee (SC) Joint supportEvery 6-12 months, focus on:•Steering the work of the MLM; OECD and UNDP to deliver light global•Acting as „ambassadors‟ of “secretariat”, including:the GP •Conducting global monitoring;•Guiding the secretariat •Producing analytic work;•Undertaking other tasks •Providing advisory support;directed from MLM •Organising MLMs; •Delivering secretariat and advisory services to the SC
    9. 9. Composition of the Steering Committee CHAIRS Recipient ProviderRecipient / Private Provider sector Parliament CSO UNDP OECD /DAC UNDG MDB
    10. 10. But the Global Partnership is much more than Ministerial meetings and a steering committee… It’s about delivering at the country level
    11. 11. Monitoring the implementation of Busan commitments
    12. 12. A country focussed – globally light approach COUNTRY LEVEL FRAMEWORKS Own indicators and targets Lead by the country Results made public + INTERNATIONAL LEVEL FRAMEWORK Selective indicators and targets, measured globally or aggregating country-level information Monitor progress on a rolling basis Managed by the Global Partnership
    13. 13. The Busan global monitoring framework• The best possible compromise: political focus, selectivity, grounded in existing processes• Responding to partner country priorities• A balance between indicators that track “unfinished business” from Paris/Accra and some that reflect the broader nature of the Busan agreement• Focus on behaviour change expected to contribute to results• Indicator are proxies, and can never tell the full story
    14. 14. Why a global monitoring framework? SERVE AS A SUPPORTS REFERENCE POINT ACCOUNTABILITY FOR COUNTRY LEVEL FRAMEWORKS STIMULATE BROAD-BASED DIALOGUE AND LEARNING
    15. 15. Global indicators Thematic Indicator1 Development co-operation is focused on results that Extent of use of country results frameworks by co-operation providers meet developing countries’ priorities (specific criteria to be finalised).2 Civil society operates within an environment which Enabling Environment Index maximises its engagement in and contribution to development3 Engagement and contribution of the private sector Measure to be identified to development4 Transparency: information on development co- Measure of state of implementation of the common standard by co- operation is publicly available operation providers5 Development co-operation is more predictable a) annual: proportion of aid disbursed within the fiscal year within which it was scheduled by co-operation providers; b) medium-term: proportion of aid covered by indicative forward spending plans provided at the country level6 Aid is on budgets which are subject to parliamentary % of aid scheduled for disbursement that is recorded in the annual scrutiny budgets approved by the legislatures of developing countries.7 Mutual accountability among development co- % of countries that undertake inclusive mutual assessments of operation actors is strengthened through inclusive progress in implementing agreed commitments. reviews8 Gender equality and women’s empowerment % of countries with systems that track and make public allocations for gender equality and women’s empowerment.9 Effective institutions: developing countries’ systems (a) Quality of developing country PFM systems; and (b) Use of are strengthened and used country PFM and procurement systems.10 Aid is untied % of aid that is fully untied.
    16. 16. Global Indicators: Info to be provided by countries Thematic Indicator1 Development co-operation is focused on results that Extent of use of country results frameworks by co-operation providers meet developing countries’ priorities (specific criteria to be finalised).2 Civil society operates within an environment which Enabling Environment Index maximises its engagement in and contribution to development3 Engagement and contribution of the private sector Measure to be identified to development4 Transparency: information on development co- Measure of state of implementation of the common standard by co- operation is publicly available operation providers5 Development co-operation is more predictable a) annual: proportion of aid disbursed within the fiscal year within which it was scheduled by co-operation providers; b) medium-term: proportion of aid covered by indicative forward spending plans provided at the country level6 Aid is on budgets which are subject to parliamentary % of aid scheduled for disbursement that is recorded in the annual scrutiny budgets approved by the legislatures of developing countries.7 Mutual accountability among development co- % of countries that undertake inclusive mutual assessments of operation actors is strengthened through inclusive progress in implementing agreed commitments. reviews8 Gender equality and women’s empowerment % of countries with systems that track and make public allocations for gender equality and women’s empowerment.9 Effective institutions: developing countries’ systems (a) Quality of developing country PFM systems; and (b) Use of are strengthened and used country PFM and procurement systems.10 Aid is untied % of aid that is fully untied.
    17. 17. Approach to global monitoring• Global progress reports produced to inform ministerial-level meetings• No more centrally managed surveys – use of existing sources of data when and as they become available• Data collection at country level to be grounded in existing national monitoring processes• Continued support through a Global Help Desk Facility• Overall assessment of progress to draw on indicators and complementary qualitative evidence• Periodic reviews of global indicators and underpinning methodology through the Steering Committee
    18. 18. Country level monitoring• Essential to make the Busan commitments real, as delivery is at the country level.• Led by developing countries according their specific demands• Existence of country level monitoring reinforces global monitoring.• Could be coordinated regionally
    19. 19. Joint OECD/UNDP support to the Global Partnership
    20. 20. Scope for joint OECD-UNDP support• Provide a light global secretariat function• Develop and implement a global monitoring framework• Support partnership and accountability frameworks in developing countries• Facilitate learning and knowledge sharing
    21. 21. Support on the implementation of country-level partnership and accountability frameworks UNDP Country programs: Provide demand-driven policy advice and technical assistance to developing countries focused on co-operation policies and partnership and accountability frameworks FIJI UNDP regional teams: Support regional knowledge-sharing and backstop country initiatives through advisors located in regional APRC centres. UNDP/OECD: Participation in analytic and advisory work on an ad-hoc basis by HQ-based staff (e.g. where work is of a pilot nature, of special interest to the Global Partnership, or can inform international efforts…)
    22. 22. Next steps … End July: End 2012: Nomination of co-chairs Operational guidance and and Steering Committee methodology for globalmembers to be announced monitoring to be finalised 2012 2013 Fall: Early 2013: Global Partnership Global Partnership Steering Committee to Ministerial level meet for the first time meeting to be held
    23. 23. Thank you…

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