FEBRUARY 19, 2014
PRESENTED BY MICHELLE DOYLE

Capitol Hill Education Update
Do Nothing Congress
 This Congress has not accomplished much
 Evidence of the gridlock in DC
 44 substantive laws enact...
What Has Been Done?
 Appropriation of funds
 Passage of ESEA in the House
 Bills for ESEA reauthorization introduced in...
Appropriations—A Look Back
• The sequester is a group of cuts to federal spending set to take
effect March 1, barring furt...
Impact of Sequestration

 Across-the-board cut of 5.1% for Education Department
programs
 Cuts in each LEAs differed:
• ...
Appropriators: Omnibus

 Title IA Subgrants to Local Educational Agencies:
• FY 2013 $13,760,219
• FY 2014 $14,384,802

•...
Different Funding Sources Title I

 Basic grants
• FY 2013 $6,232,639
• FY 2014 $6,459,401
• Percentage change:

+ 3.638%...
Funding Sources (cont.)

 Targeted grants:
• FY 2013 $3,116,831
• FY 2014 $3,281,550

• Percentage change:

+ 5.285%

 E...
Titles IIA and III Funding
 Title IIA
• FY 2013 $2,337,830
• FY 2014 $2,349,830
• Percentage change:

+ .513%

 Title II...
ESEA Reauthorization

 First signed into law January 2002 for 5 years
 Renewed each year without change
 Several attemp...
Highlights of Kline bill
 Enhanced consultation language, goal to reach agreement,
added pooling and how $$ calculated, “...
Biggest changes
 Title I funds determined prior to any set asides
• Currently 20% or more set aside for public school onl...
Harkin bill

 Passed the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions
Committee (HELP)
 Did not include any changes to t...
Alexander bill
 Minority alternative
 Not considered by the Committee
 Includes “fix” for Title I
• Funding for private...
Administrative Initiatives
 State of the Union: If Congress can’t get it done,
Administration will use Executive Orders
...
Waivers
 Began with 2012-13 school year for two years
 45 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the
Bureau o...
Waived Requirements Include…





Adequate Yearly Progress
Provision of SES
Provision of public school choice transpor...
Requirements Include…





Common Core or other acceptable standards
Assessments tied to standards
Priority and focus ...
Renewal of Waivers 2014-15
 This one-year extension will allow SEAs and ED to gather
additional information on successes ...
Private School Implications of Waivers

 Difficult to get transparency
 No longer (unless in waiver app) have SES, publi...
ConnectED Initiative






High-speed internet to the classroom,
Affordable mobile learning devices,
High-quality lear...
Updates Needed

 Many of the terms we use today to describe technologyenhanced learning did not exist when laws such ESEA...
Innovative Use of Federal Funds
 Support teachers using digital learning tools (IIA and IA)
 Provide online professional...
Additional Ideas
 Use technology to communicate with parents (IA, III, IDEA)
 Connect teachers and STEM professionals wi...
Community Eligibility Option
 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010
 Goal to increase meals served
 Direct certificatio...
Title I Guidance
 www2.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/13-0381guidance.doc
 Public and private schools eligible for using CE...
Implications for Private Schools

 CEO could lead to higher public school count
• That’s the goal of the program!

 Titl...
Bonus Topic!! New Private School Statistics
 Private school enrollment declined by 11 percent from 6.1
million in 2005 to...
Questions? Contact Michelle at mdoyledc@gmail.com
View the recording of this webinar on Catapult’s site:
www.catapultlearn...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Capitol Hill Education Update

305 views

Published on

So much of what we hear in the press is that this Congress is not accomplishing much if anything. In many ways, this applies to their work on education, too. But there has been some activity recently that is of importance to private school educators, including action by the U.S. Department of Education.

Please join us for a Capitol Hill Education Update webinar for private and religious schools. Participants will learn about all of the following changes and how they impact the implementation of federal education programs for students attending private schools:

Appropriation of funds
Passage of ESEA in the House
Bills for ESEA reauthorization introduced in the Senate
New guidance on the use of federal funds of technology
Guidance on new method of counting students for Title I
Extension of Waivers

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
305
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
25
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Capitol Hill Education Update

  1. 1. FEBRUARY 19, 2014 PRESENTED BY MICHELLE DOYLE Capitol Hill Education Update
  2. 2. Do Nothing Congress  This Congress has not accomplished much  Evidence of the gridlock in DC  44 substantive laws enacted this year • Compared to average of 70 between 1999 and 2012
  3. 3. What Has Been Done?  Appropriation of funds  Passage of ESEA in the House  Bills for ESEA reauthorization introduced in the Senate *********************************************  Extension of Waivers  New guidance on the use of federal funds of technology  Guidance on new method of counting students for Title I
  4. 4. Appropriations—A Look Back • The sequester is a group of cuts to federal spending set to take effect March 1, barring further congressional action. • The sequester was originally passed as part of the Budget Control Act of 2011 (BCA), better known as the debt ceiling compromise. • It was intended to serve as incentive for the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction (aka the “Supercommittee”) to come to a deal to cut $1.5 trillion over 10 years. If the committee had done so, and Congress had passed it by Dec. 23, 2011, then the sequester would have been averted.
  5. 5. Impact of Sequestration  Across-the-board cut of 5.1% for Education Department programs  Cuts in each LEAs differed: • Increase in poverty = application of formula yields less than 5.1% cut • Decrease in poverty = application of formula yields more than 5.1% cut
  6. 6. Appropriators: Omnibus  Title IA Subgrants to Local Educational Agencies: • FY 2013 $13,760,219 • FY 2014 $14,384,802 • Percentage change: + 4.539%  This change in appropriations for the 2014-15 school year nearly restores all of the funds that were lost during the 2013-14 school year due to sequestration.
  7. 7. Different Funding Sources Title I  Basic grants • FY 2013 $6,232,639 • FY 2014 $6,459,401 • Percentage change: + 3.638%  Concentration grants: • FY 2013 $1,293,919 • FY 2014 $1,362,301 • Percentage change: + 5.285%
  8. 8. Funding Sources (cont.)  Targeted grants: • FY 2013 $3,116,831 • FY 2014 $3,281,550 • Percentage change: + 5.285%  Education finance grants: • FY 2013 $3,116,831 • FY 2014 $3,281,550 • Percentage change: + 5.285%
  9. 9. Titles IIA and III Funding  Title IIA • FY 2013 $2,337,830 • FY 2014 $2,349,830 • Percentage change: + .513%  Title III • FY 2013 $693,848 • FY 2014 $732,400 • Percentage change: + 4.259%
  10. 10. ESEA Reauthorization  First signed into law January 2002 for 5 years  Renewed each year without change  Several attempts at passage • Miller proposal • Kline bill (passed House) • Harkin bill (passed out of Committtee twice) • Alexander bill
  11. 11. Highlights of Kline bill  Enhanced consultation language, goal to reach agreement, added pooling and how $$ calculated, “substantially failed” added to bypass and complaint  Calculate private school funding on state level—inform simultaneously; ombudsman  Sign off for all programs  Counseling and mentoring firmed up in Title I
  12. 12. Biggest changes  Title I funds determined prior to any set asides • Currently 20% or more set aside for public school only purposes  Title IIA funds determined prior to other uses by LEA • Currently LEA chooses to spend IIA funds on class size reduction, teacher recruitment/retention, and professional development
  13. 13. Harkin bill  Passed the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee (HELP)  Did not include any changes to the private school sections
  14. 14. Alexander bill  Minority alternative  Not considered by the Committee  Includes “fix” for Title I • Funding for private school program determined prior to any set asides by the LEA
  15. 15. Administrative Initiatives  State of the Union: If Congress can’t get it done, Administration will use Executive Orders  Administration has already been making changes • Waivers • Technology • Community Eligibility Option
  16. 16. Waivers  Began with 2012-13 school year for two years  45 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Bureau of Indian Education submitted requests for ESEA flexibility  42 States, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are approved for ESEA flexibility
  17. 17. Waived Requirements Include…     Adequate Yearly Progress Provision of SES Provision of public school choice transportation Schools and Districts in Need of Improvement
  18. 18. Requirements Include…     Common Core or other acceptable standards Assessments tied to standards Priority and focus schools Reward schools
  19. 19. Renewal of Waivers 2014-15  This one-year extension will allow SEAs and ED to gather additional information on successes and challenges in the implementation of reforms committed to under ESEA flexibility, in order to improve current systems and better support students and teachers.  Must amend application to address monitoring findings
  20. 20. Private School Implications of Waivers  Difficult to get transparency  No longer (unless in waiver app) have SES, public school choice, SINI, DINI = less set asides  Add common core  Add priority and focus schools = set asides (in some cases)
  21. 21. ConnectED Initiative     High-speed internet to the classroom, Affordable mobile learning devices, High-quality learning content, and Support for teachers to move to digital learning within five years.
  22. 22. Updates Needed  Many of the terms we use today to describe technologyenhanced learning did not exist when laws such ESEA and IDEA were passed (2001 and 2004)  ED: Need to clarify opportunities to use federal grant funds to support digital learning  http://www.ed.gov/edblogs/technology/files/2013/06/Fed eral-Funds-Tech-DC-.pdf
  23. 23. Innovative Use of Federal Funds  Support teachers using digital learning tools (IIA and IA)  Provide online professional development (IIA)  Adopt digital competency-based professional development (IIA and IA)  Digital resources for Common Core (IIA)  Digital educational resources for English Language Learners and students with disabilities (III and IDEA)
  24. 24. Additional Ideas  Use technology to communicate with parents (IA, III, IDEA)  Connect teachers and STEM professionals with technology (IIA and IIB)  Participate in English Learner focused Communities of Practice (III)  Provide students with mobile learning devices (IA)  Provide assistive technology (IDEA)
  25. 25. Community Eligibility Option  Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010  Goal to increase meals served  Direct certification • SNAP, TANF, Medicaid, etc.  Schools with 40% or more directly certified students are eligible  1.6 times # of directly certified = new lunch count  Serve free meals to all  All states eligible 2014-15
  26. 26. Title I Guidance  www2.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/13-0381guidance.doc  Public and private schools eligible for using CEO • Unlikely many private schools will use the option – Need 40% directly certified – Need to participate in the lunch program – Need to provide free lunches to those not counted for reimbursement
  27. 27. Implications for Private Schools  CEO could lead to higher public school count • That’s the goal of the program!  Title I funding does not increase due to use of CEO  Proportional share for private school program will be less if public school count is higher
  28. 28. Bonus Topic!! New Private School Statistics  Private school enrollment declined by 11 percent from 6.1 million in 2005 to 5.4 million in 2010.  About one in ten U.S. elementary and secondary school students is a private school student.  Projected private school enrollment for the next several years is estimated to vary little  The number of full-time equivalent private elementary and secondary school teachers in the fall of 2012 was estimated at 0.4 million, down from 0.5 million in 2007 (Digest of Education Statistics 2012)
  29. 29. Questions? Contact Michelle at mdoyledc@gmail.com View the recording of this webinar on Catapult’s site: www.catapultlearning.com/webinars Follow Michelle Doyle Educational Consulting on Facebook Check out Michelle’s blog at www.ask-michelle.com THANK YOU!

×