The Positive Impact of Visual
Literacy and Museum
Education Concepts
Integrated Through Art Into
Your Curriculum and Into ...
To get your students to become experts on
a subject, become confident public
speakers, educators and advocates with
expert...
~Cassia Kite
This presentation is based on my research of
visual and media literacy and how
incorporating the use of visua...
Art in my lessons?!
You may be asking yourself…
What does art have to do with my curriculum?
I don’t have a degree to teac...
Visual Literacy
“Visual literacy is the ability to decode
visual symbols into meaning…to
articulate to others your perception of
what the ...
“The most important aspect here for
educators is to present material in a
way which encourages sufficient
retention of inf...
“Students need to learn visually and
teachers need to learn to teach
visually” (Stokes 2002, p. 14).
~ Suzanne Stokes
Stok...
“Just as ‘visual imagery clearly forcefully reinforces
the basic message’ (Knupfer 1993, p.149), so
colour, form and line ...
“Literacy is not simply understanding the
grammatical rules of language. Instead, ‘it
refers to a connection between the
r...
Media Literacy
Media literacy is defined as being “a repertoire of
competences that enable people to analyze,
evaluate and create message...
“Media literacy is the ability to create
personal meaning from the verbal and
visual symbols we take in every day
through ...
Educators that use visual literacy to
communicate and build relationships
between the student’s life experiences
and learn...
Using contemporary ways of incorporating the
students’ present life experiences into their
everyday education will help th...
Art, media literacy and
visual literacy are all
speaking the same
language but in different
ways to the viewer. The
messag...
Museum
Education
Norman Rockwell Image: 7/5/2010
http://www.gse.harvard.edu/academics/masters/aie/images/news/rockwell_0
0...
Museum education is “an inquiry-
based method of discussing visual art
that is common in museums and is
highly recommended...
Abigail Housen and The
Visual Thinking Strategies
Abigail Housen is a cognitive
psychologist, who developed five
stages of...
The Visual Thinking Strategies
Alongside Housen’s five stages, the curriculum for
The Visual Thinking Strategies was devel...
“Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) is
a research-based teaching method
that improves critical thinking and
language skills ...
The Visual Thinking Strategies that
Housen developed encourage the
learner to connect to artwork, build
confidence in thei...
In terms of relating media literacy to
the Visual Thinking Strategies, if you
review the definition of media literacy,
you...
…the Visual Thinking Strategies
improve critical thinking and
language skills through discussions
of visual images, encour...
Artsonia
One way that I build confidence in my students
is giving them the opportunity to exhibit their
artwork online. Ar...
The Salvador Dali
Museum in St.
Petersburg, Florida
has a museum
education program
that is exhibiting
media literacy,
visu...
The Museum Curator of Education
has developed a program named
The Junior Docent Program that
give students the opportunity...
In conclusion, art education within
all subjects where the media is
used or visual images are shown
for the students to an...
Media literacy addresses cultural
differences in the classroom, enables
ways for all students to be involved
in class disc...
References:
Hobbs, R. “Expanding the Concepts of Literacy” Published as “Expanding the
Concepts of Literacy,” in Robert Ku...
Stokes, S. (2002). Visual Literacy in Teaching and Learning: A Literature
Perspective. Retrieved February 8, 2010, from:
h...
Museum Education
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Museum Education

  1. 1. The Positive Impact of Visual Literacy and Museum Education Concepts Integrated Through Art Into Your Curriculum and Into the Classroom Cassia Kite EME5207Sum2010 University of Florida
  2. 2. To get your students to become experts on a subject, become confident public speakers, educators and advocates with expertise on their chosen subjects while incorporating art into their lessons may not sound easy, so I would like to share with you some of my recent findings.
  3. 3. ~Cassia Kite This presentation is based on my research of visual and media literacy and how incorporating the use of visual materials into your lessons can positively influence the education of our youth today. Museum education is one particular area I will discuss in reference to providing an example as to how you as an educator may consider incorporating a more inquiry-based teaching method into your classroom. I will also provide information as to why I feel media literacy is important to education.
  4. 4. Art in my lessons?! You may be asking yourself… What does art have to do with my curriculum? I don’t have a degree to teach art? You want me to teach one more thing within my already ‘too full’ lesson plans? My answer to all of these questions is YES!!! …and this is why…
  5. 5. Visual Literacy
  6. 6. “Visual literacy is the ability to decode visual symbols into meaning…to articulate to others your perception of what the image communicates and listen to others’ responses; to create visual statements” (Hobbs 1996, pgs 4-5). ~R. Hobbs Hobbs, R. “Expanding the Concepts of Literacy” Published as “Expanding the Concepts of Literacy,” in Robert Kubey (ed), Media Literacy in the Information Age. New York: Transaction Press, 1996. Retrieved, 5/14/2006 1:54:19 PM from: http://interact.uoregan.edu/MediaLit/mlr/readings/articles/hobbs/expanding.html
  7. 7. “The most important aspect here for educators is to present material in a way which encourages sufficient retention of information to facilitate satisfactory learning in a culture that over recent decades has changed considerably” (Sankey 2002, p. 2). ~M.D. Sankey Sankey, M.D. 2002, Considering visual literacy when designing instruction. The Journal of Instructional Science and Technology, 5(2).
  8. 8. “Students need to learn visually and teachers need to learn to teach visually” (Stokes 2002, p. 14). ~ Suzanne Stokes Stokes, S. (2002). Visual Literacy in Teaching and Learning: A Literature Perspective. Retrieved February 8, 2010, from: http://online.education.ufl.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=46637
  9. 9. “Just as ‘visual imagery clearly forcefully reinforces the basic message’ (Knupfer 1993, p.149), so colour, form and line will ensure attention to perception and the engagement of the ‘visual brain’, which in turn resonates with remembered experience and results in linguistic representation. Therefore the image will allow for a ‘sustained and adaptive learning environment necessary to increase learning potential’ (Heath 2000, p.123)” (Sankey 2002, p. 6). ~M.D. Sankey Sankey, M.D. 2002, Considering visual literacy when designing instruction. The Journal of Instructional Science and Technology, 5(2).
  10. 10. “Literacy is not simply understanding the grammatical rules of language. Instead, ‘it refers to a connection between the recognition, production and retrieval of what is constituted as information on the one hand, and its use or deployment as a communication practice on the other’ (Schirato & Yell 1996, p.208)” (Hobbs 1996, p. 7). Hobbs, R. “Expanding the Concepts of Literacy” Published as “Expanding the Concepts of Literacy,” in Robert Kubey (ed), Media Literacy in the Information Age. New York: Transaction Press, 1996. Retrieved, 5/14/2006 1:54:19 PM from: http://interact.uoregan.edu/MediaLit/mlr/readings/articles/hobbs/expanding.html
  11. 11. Media Literacy
  12. 12. Media literacy is defined as being “a repertoire of competences that enable people to analyze, evaluate and create messages in a wide variety of media modes, genres and forms. Education for media literacy often uses an inquiry-based pedagogic model that encourages people to ask questions about what they watch, hear, and read. Media literacy education provides tools to help people critically analyze messages, offers opportunities for learners to broaden their experience of media, and helps them develop creative skills in making their own media messages” (Wikipedia, Media Literacy).
  13. 13. “Media literacy is the ability to create personal meaning from the verbal and visual symbols we take in every day through television, radio, computers, newspapers and magazines, and, of course, advertising. It’s the ability to choose and select, the ability to challenge and question, the ability to be conscious about what’s going on around us (45)”(Pace 2007, pg. 2).
  14. 14. Educators that use visual literacy to communicate and build relationships between the student’s life experiences and learning in the classroom, will be able to engage and communicate with their students so that the students will understand and retain more from learning while gaining the self- confidence they need to reach the highest level of their learning experience.
  15. 15. Using contemporary ways of incorporating the students’ present life experiences into their everyday education will help them understand the influence that visual and social media has on the way they look at the world. “Art is essentially a communication. Art speaks in the language of its media; it uses techniques that are designed to inspire responses” (Way 2006, Chapter 2, pg. 5). Way, C. 2006. Focus On Photography: A Curriculum Guide. The International School of Photography: Chapter 2 LINK, The Language of Photography; Chapter 3 LINK,Visual Literacy.
  16. 16. Art, media literacy and visual literacy are all speaking the same language but in different ways to the viewer. The messages are of many, but the ways are through the eyes, the ears and the hands.
  17. 17. Museum Education Norman Rockwell Image: 7/5/2010 http://www.gse.harvard.edu/academics/masters/aie/images/news/rockwell_0 00.gif
  18. 18. Museum education is “an inquiry- based method of discussing visual art that is common in museums and is highly recommended for classroom discussions as well. To work with this method, educators must be attuned to the group’s level and advance at its pace” (Hobbs 1996, p.9). Hobbs, R. “Expanding the Concepts of Literacy” Published as “Expanding the Concepts of Literacy,” in Robert Kubey (ed), Media Literacy in the Information Age. New York: Transaction Press, 1996. Retrieved, 5/14/2006 1:54:19 PM from: http://interact.uoregan.edu/MediaLit/mlr/readings/articles/hobbs/expanding.html
  19. 19. Abigail Housen and The Visual Thinking Strategies Abigail Housen is a cognitive psychologist, who developed five stages of Aesthetic Development. These five stages of development are found in the curriculum for the Visual Thinking Strategies.
  20. 20. The Visual Thinking Strategies Alongside Housen’s five stages, the curriculum for The Visual Thinking Strategies was developed and the following is a list of suggestions that were found to be influential in both museum education and classroom settings: accessibility, captivation, expressive content, narrative, diversity, realism, media, subjects, sequences, series/themes, things to avoid, specific considerations for younger viewers and for viewers with some experience (Yenawine 2009, pgs. 3-9). Yenawine, P. (2009). Jumpstart Visual Literacy: Thoughts on Image Selection. New York, NY Visual Understanding in Education. www. visualthinkingstrategies.org
  21. 21. “Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) is a research-based teaching method that improves critical thinking and language skills through discussions of visual images. VTS encourages participation and self-confidence, especially among students who struggle. VTS is easy to learn and offers a proven strategy for educators to meet current learning objectives” ( http://www.vtshome.org/).
  22. 22. The Visual Thinking Strategies that Housen developed encourage the learner to connect to artwork, build confidence in their ability to communicate their understanding of a work of art, to be active in class and group discussions, to develop thinking, communication and writing skills and to get the learner to transfer these skills to other parts of their educational experience (VUE, www.vue,org).
  23. 23. In terms of relating media literacy to the Visual Thinking Strategies, if you review the definition of media literacy, you see that just as medial literacy provides tools to help people critically analyze messages, offers opportunities for learners to broaden their experience of media, and helps them develop creative skills in making their own media messages…
  24. 24. …the Visual Thinking Strategies improve critical thinking and language skills through discussions of visual images, encourages participation and self-confidence in the learner, and to develop thinking, communication and writing skills and to get the learner to transfer these skills to other parts of their educational experience.
  25. 25. Artsonia One way that I build confidence in my students is giving them the opportunity to exhibit their artwork online. Artsonia is known as being the largest online children’s art gallery and students can not only view their work, but family and friends can leave comments and purchase the image to be reproduced on items such as keychains, t-shirts and coffee mugs in support of the school art program. My school’s Artsonia site is found when you search: Belleair Elementary School, Clearwater, FL
  26. 26. The Salvador Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida has a museum education program that is exhibiting media literacy, visual literacy and the Visual Thinking Strategies in collaboration with one another. Dali Philippe Halsman. Dali Double Moustache. Salvador Dalí.: Uploaded on November 23, 2009 by RaúlVillalón www.flickr.com/photos/raulvillalon/4127870395/
  27. 27. The Museum Curator of Education has developed a program named The Junior Docent Program that give students the opportunity to explore museum education. Please click on this link to see Peter Tush, Curator of Education at the Dali Museum, narrate this video featuring the Junior Docent Summer Camp at the Dali.
  28. 28. In conclusion, art education within all subjects where the media is used or visual images are shown for the students to analyze and interpret creates an education that harbors what is going on in the world today and how the students can learn from their personal experiences.
  29. 29. Media literacy addresses cultural differences in the classroom, enables ways for all students to be involved in class discussions, gives the students encouragement to explore connections between images and text and how they relate to their life experiences and can help to develop multiliteracies that are needed to make sense of multimodal instructional materials (Pace 2007, pgs. 2-3).
  30. 30. References: Hobbs, R. “Expanding the Concepts of Literacy” Published as “Expanding the Concepts of Literacy,” in Robert Kubey (ed), Media Literacy in the Information Age. New York: Transaction Press, 1996. Retrieved, 5/14/2006 1:54:19 PM from:http://interact.uoregan.edu/MediaLit/mlr/readings/articles/hobbs/expand ing.html Dali Philippe Halsman. Dali Double Moustache. Salvador Dalí.: Uploaded on November 23, 2009 by RaúlVillalón www.flickr.com/photos/raulvillalon/4127870395/ Norman Rockwell Image: 7/5/2010 http://www.gse.harvard.edu/academics/masters/aie/images/news/rockwell_00 0.gif Pace, B. (2007). “A Glimpse of Media Literacy Education” UF Reserves. Sankey, M.D. 2002, Considering visual literacy when designing instruction. The Journal of Instructional Science and Technology, 5(2).
  31. 31. Stokes, S. (2002). Visual Literacy in Teaching and Learning: A Literature Perspective. Retrieved February 8, 2010, from: http://online.education.ufl.edu/mod/resource/view.php?id=46637 VUE, www.vue,org Way, C. 2006. Focus On Photography: A Curriculum Guide. The International School of Photography: Chapter 2 LINK, The Language of Photography; Chapter 3 LINK,Visual Literacy. Wikipedia, Media Literacy Yenawine, P. (2009). Jumpstart Visual Literacy: Thoughts on Image Selection. New York, NY Visual Understanding in Education. www.visualthinkingstrategies.org You Tube: Junior Docent Program: http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=pwEJlqEzsCg

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