Dementia of alzheimer's2

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  • For centuries not much was known about people that suffered severe loss of memory, confusion and difficulty understanding.It wasn’t until 1901, that a 51 year old female patient of Dr. Alois Alzheimer died after several years of severe memory loss and other brain related difficulties. After her death Dr. Alzheimer performed her autopsy and discovered identifiable abnormalities in her brain cells. He presented his case at a meeting and he called it “Alzheimer’s Disease” This degenerative brain disorder of cells surrounded with plaque and twisted bands of fibers, when found in an autopsy, mean a definite diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. In the eighteenth century the word ‘Dementia’ had a clinical and a legal usage referring to states of psychological incompetence regardless of age and later it was viewed as a irreversible disorder.
  • Dementia of Alzheimer’s- This type of Dementia is the most common form. It is a Neurological Disease(Relating to the Nervous System) that is characterized by loss of mental ability that can serve enough to interfere with normal activities.
  • Memory ImpairmentHesitantDisoriented about thingsUnable to plan thingsHe was incontinent of stool in clothing (went to the bathroom in his clothes)m
  • Scientist are not sure what exactly causes itToxic reactions to alcohol and drugs Nutritional deficiencies Infections that affect the brain or an illness to the brainHead injury
  • In order for us to diagnose his disorder we had to use the DSM. In our diagnostic criteria it said that the patient had to:
  • Our patients Ed is 68 years old and he has been evaluated for the past nine years by the Veterans Hospital.He has memory problems and have been increasing over time. Ed’s mood also started to change from an outgoing and happy person to someone who avoided conversation. Ed has no family history of any cognitive or psychiatric disorders and he has always been in good general health.
  • Our patients Ed is 68 years old and he has been evaluated for the past nine years by the Veterans Hospital.He has memory problems and have been increasing over time. Ed’s mood also started to change from an outgoing and happy person to someone who avoided conversation. Ed has no family history of any cognitive or psychiatric disorders and he has always been in good general health.
  • Numerous books, clinical studies and articles are written about Alzheimer’s Disease. All of which look for ways to discover causes and effective treatment, and to provide guidance to Alzheimer patient care givers. These range from drug treatment and non-drug treatment procedures, ways to cope, discovering causes , and ultimately finding a cure or a means of prevention.
  • Ronald ReaganSugar Ray RobinsonNorman Rockwell
  • There is no cure for this yet but there are medications you can take to help slow down the process.
  • Dementia of alzheimer's2

    1. 1. Madi Sottos and Mallory SpencerDEMENTIA OF ALZHEIMERS
    2. 2. First Diagnostic
    3. 3. Dementia of Alzheimer’s Dementia of Alzheimer’s- This type of Dementia is the most common form. It is a Neurological Disease(Relating to the Nervous System) that is characterized by loss of mental ability that can serve enough to interfere with normal activities.
    4. 4. SymptomsDifficulty performing familiar tasksMemory lossProblems using languageDisorientationLoss of good judgmentProblems with abstract thinkingMisplacing thingsRapid mood swingsPersonality changesLoss of initiative and loss of interest
    5. 5. Known CausesScientist are not sure what exactly causes itToxic reactions to alcohol and drugsNutritional deficienciesInfections that affect the brain or an illness to the brainHead injury
    6. 6. Using the DSMA.1) Have memory impairment2) Or one or more of these disturbances: A)Aphasia(Language disturbance) B) Apraxia(Impaired ability to carry out motor activities) C) Agnosia( Failure to recognize or identify objects) D) Disturbance in executive functioning(Planning, organizing,
    7. 7. Using the DSMB) The cognitive deficits in Part A each causesignificant impairment in social or occupationalfunctioning.C) The course is a gradual onset and continuingcognitive decline.
    8. 8. Using the DSMD) The cognitive deficits in Part A cannot be dueto any of the following:1) Other central nervous system conditions that cause deficits(Parkinson’s Disease, Huntington’s disease, brain tumor, etc.)2) Systemic conditions that are known to cause Dementia(Vitamin deficiencies, Hypothyroidism, etc.)3) Substance-induced conditions
    9. 9. Using the DSME) The deficits do not occur exclusively duringthe course of a delirium.F) The disturbance is not better accounted for byanother Axis I disorder(Major depressivedisorder, Schizophrenia)
    10. 10. Overview of Case StudyPatient is 68 years oldEvaluated for nine yearsGradual loss of memoryFrequent mood changesNo history of cognitive or psychiatric disordersGeneral health good
    11. 11. Characteristics of EdChanges in moodStay away from others and interactionPacedTurning the heater to 500” (crazy)ThreateningHad troubles staying focused
    12. 12. Overview continuedSymptomsstarted toget better Wife • Pacing noticed • Would lock himself in bedroom subtle • Became physical changes
    13. 13. Those More SusceptibleWoman are 2x more likely to get itAge- 65 and older have a greater chance of getting itObesityHigh blood pressureDiabetes
    14. 14. Articles/Studies/BooksGenetic Linkage Study – Duke UniversityAlly- From the NotebookInto the AbyssAway from HerThe Savages
    15. 15. Famous Peoplewith Dementia of Alzheimers Ronald Reagan Sugar Ray Robinson Norman Rockwell
    16. 16. TreatmentsAcetylcholinesterase inhibitors Namenda (memantine)• ARICEPT• EXELON PATCH• EXELON• RAZADYNE
    17. 17. Prognosis for People with Alzheimer’s DiseaseUnfortunately, there is currently no cureAverage life expectancy is 8 to 10 yearsHighly dependent on persons age and other medical problemsPatients generally die of medical complications, i.e. pneumonia or thefluAlzheimer’s is fatal

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