Linda Carraway


M2N5. Students will represent and interpret quantities and relationships using
mathematical expressions i...
Activity:

As you read the story for each character have, the children make predictions about the
next question that Eddie...
Assessment



Put the correct symbol into the blank   (< or > )

   1. 12 ____ 24

   2. 10_____6

   3. 20_____22

   4. ...
Math lit more or less
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Math lit more or less

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Math lit more or less

  1. 1. Linda Carraway M2N5. Students will represent and interpret quantities and relationships using mathematical expressions including equality and inequality signs (=, >, <, ≠). The standard I found to relate to the book was 2nd grade. I feel this book could be used for 3rd through 5th grade class. You can use relate it to mental math computations. Summary In More or Less, the math concept is comparing numbers, an important part of understanding the concepts of “greater than” and “less than.” It also demonstrates the skill of making logical guesses. This is a story about a kid named Eddie who has a booth at the school fair, guessing people’s ages. Rather than making a random guess Eddie asks questions to make and educated guess. If he guesses in three questions or less Eddie wins. If he answers with four questions or less you get a prize but if it takes more than five questions Eddie gets dunked!
  2. 2. Activity: As you read the story for each character have, the children make predictions about the next question that Eddie will ask before you read on. Stop again after Eddie figures out the correct answer and discuss how the questions helped him arrive at the correct answer. Then tell the children you are thinking of a number between 15 and 25, for example. As the child makes guesses, indicate whether each guess is more or less than the correct answer. Encourage the children to try to find the number in three guesses. Then you can call on different children to come up with different numbers to guess. Put the children in groups of five. Make twelve cards, each with a number and the “greater than” or “less than” sign (for example <10, >15), and twelve cards with only a number. Mix up each set of cards in two separate stacks and turn them facedown. The first player turns up two cards, one from each stack. If the player can arrange them to make a true number sentence (such as 14< 30), he or she keeps them and goes again. If not, the cards are put back facedown and the next player takes a turn.
  3. 3. Assessment Put the correct symbol into the blank (< or > ) 1. 12 ____ 24 2. 10_____6 3. 20_____22 4. 4_______7 5. 12______15 6. 25______30 7. 14______9 8. 11______12 9. 9______2 10. 16_____21

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