Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Product Design in Agile Environments: Making it Work at ProductCamp Pittsburgh

416 views

Published on

Can Product Design work in Agile environments? Yes! Balancing people and process can be complicated, and in this talk, Carol will provide you guidance to make it work. You can inform good design with strong user experience (UX) research and support continuous releases in a fast-paced environment. We'll look at ways to achieve a flexible approach that meets the needs of these seemingly conflicting efforts. Participants will come away with the tools they need to successfully integrate design thinking methods, in an Agile environment, one sprint at a time.
Selected for presentation at ProductCamp Pittsburgh in September 2018 at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU).

Published in: Design
  • Discover a WEIRD trick I use to make over $3500 per month taking paid surveys online. read more... ●●● http://ishbv.com/surveys6/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Discover a WEIRD trick I use to make over $3500 per month taking paid surveys online. read more... ♥♥♥ https://tinyurl.com/make2793amonth
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • I went from getting $3 surveys to $500 surveys every day!! learn more... ♥♥♥ https://tinyurl.com/make2793amonth
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Product Design in Agile Environments: Making it Work at ProductCamp Pittsburgh

  1. 1. Product Design in Agile Environments: Making it Work Carol Smith @carologic ProductCamp Pittsburgh @PGHPCAMP September 22, 2018 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License except where noted otherwise.
  2. 2. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Everything is Designed
  3. 3. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Working with Agile 1. Partner with team 2. Best practices at smaller scale 3. Clear focus on specific users (not specific customers) and providing quick value
  4. 4. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic We Come from Different Places By Jeff Patton as interpreted by Jim Laing – Source: http://www.agileproductdesign.com/blog/user_experience_relevance.html
  5. 5. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Agile • Agile is a philosophy, not a specific set of tools – Principles are not mandates – UX was not deliberately excluded • Iterative software development methods – Scrum, Kanban, XP, etc. – Not “Waterfall”
  6. 6. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Agile UX: The Good • Most important features are done first • Working together – not “over the wall” • Keep up with technology and environmental changes • Enables iteration of requirements • Less “design drift” and less wasted design
  7. 7. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Agile UX: The Good (continued) • Issues get fixed • “Done” can include design or be “Dev ready” • Satisfying to see designs in real use • Learn from actual product use • User data has effect on current release
  8. 8. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic How can I get my Agile team onboard with Design?
  9. 9. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic AGILE Design stays just in front of the Agile ‘train’ so the train arrives at the right station.
  10. 10. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Engage with the team • They’re not going to “stop the train” for you • Work to make UX processes fit • Build trust by providing value of work • Attend daily standups/scrums
  11. 11. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Designers are part of the team • Participate in Agile ceremonies with the team • Planning/grooming, review, retro, demo • Estimating work • Take turns with Agile roles • Design doing QA of design work
  12. 12. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Squads include UX folk • Researchers, interaction designers, visual designers on squads • Larger products – Many squads – Focus on user interactions – May consult other teams as needed (e.g. review API flow)
  13. 13. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Participate in Retrospectives • Encourage retrospectives • Information provided enough/too much? • Questions still open? • Still confusing/frustrating? • More effectively communicate user needs? Image:http://intland.com/blog/project-management-en/tips-and-tricks-to-make-the-most-of-your-retrospectives/
  14. 14. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Just Ahead of the Train • Solve hard problems 1-2 iterations ahead (at most) – Research is further ahead – building right thing? • Regular usability testing (iteration-aligned) – Test whatever is ready that day – Plus UXR of existing issues and potential future work • Usability test before dev builds – saves arguments
  15. 15. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Welcome the Team to your World • Invite team to observe tests of features they wrote – Seeing someone struggle is strongly motivating • Engage Eng in helping to figure out solutions • Credit Eng when features they wrote work well
  16. 16. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Customers and Lean UX
  17. 17. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Customer Feedback – in traditional Agile • Client focused (what was proposed) vs. user focused (actual goals and needs) • Fails to find most learnability and usability issues • Misses opportunity to inform future design • Misses opportunity to gain better user insight with prototypes, observation, etc.
  18. 18. UX brings the end-user into Agile and expands the meaning of “Customer” to extend to the end-user
  19. 19. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Agile train has gone and left the user alone in the station….. Waiting …….
  20. 20. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic The Bridge to Nowhere is a concrete road bridge spanning the Mangapurua Stream in Whanganui National Park, North Island, New Zealand. It has no roads leading to it. “The biggest waste of all is building something no one wants.” - Eric Ries Eric Ries @ericries via @MelBugai on Twitter at LeanStartupMI in 2011
  21. 21. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Requirements • Questions change as you learn more • Pointless to do ALL requirements gathering up front • Works better iteratively • Get prototypes/early designs to those that will use it • Don't know what we don't know
  22. 22. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Make it Quick! • Get to 80% confidence - good enough • Continued learning – User/UX Research – Usability testing – Customer visits
  23. 23. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Parallel-Track Workflow a.k.a. Staggered Sprints
  24. 24. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Scaling Agile at Spotify via Slideshare of Vlad Mysla http://www.slideshare.net/vmysla/scrum-at-spotify?qid=2345c3ad-7e68-4383-9673-9e715ff47a75&v=default&b=&from_search=14 Squads, Tribes, Chapters and Guilds
  25. 25. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Parallel Tracks – Introduced at Autodesk in 2001 Dev track: Focus is on production code Interaction Designer track: Focus is on learning via user contact - both user experience research and interaction design “Adapting Usability Investigations for Agile User-Centered Design” by Desirée Sy. Journal of Usability Studies, Volume 2, Issue 3 https://uxpa.org/sites/default/files/agile-ucd_0.pdf
  26. 26. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic 2018: 3 Types of Work Track Tasks Goal Sprint Timing Learning Fast UX Research. Validation with prototypes/usability testing. Strategic discovery through ethnography. Research, prepare and validate 2+ sprints ahead 🌧 🌧 Research sprinkles down - Informs work 🌧 🌧 Problem Solving Interaction design of detailed communication pieces (e.g. wireframes) Create solution ideas 1-2 sprints ahead (no more) Development Support Visual design and interaction design support. Translate solution to code. Ship software at velocity With Dev Carol Smith and Thyra Rauch, UXPA 2018
  27. 27. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Two was hard enough. Why 3? • It can’t all be done at once • Talk through issues with team • Realize what works and what doesn’t • Work to teams’ strengths – Focus on solving right problems for users – Not sticking to strict guidelines
  28. 28. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Iteration 1: Development Support Track • Underlying architecture work • Critical features with minimal user interface design required Development Support: Ship Software Iteration 1 Implement high dev cost low UI cost features Adapted from “Adapting Usability Investigations for Agile User-Centered Design” by Desirée Sy. Journal of Usability Studies, Volume 2, Issue 3 http://www.uxpajournal.org/
  29. 29. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Iteration 1: Problem Solving Track • Design language, style guide • IA work (if basic knowledge of user needs) • Prototypes for future studies Development Support: Ship Software Problem Solving: Interaction Design Iteration 1 Groundwork for Design Implement high dev cost low UI cost features Adapted from “Adapting Usability Investigations for Agile User-Centered Design” by Desirée Sy. Journal of Usability Studies, Volume 2, Issue 3 http://www.uxpajournal.org/
  30. 30. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Iteration 1: Learning Track • UX Research to understand user needs (open questions) • Begin to plan usability testing and other studies Development Support: Ship Software Problem Solving: Interaction Design Learning: Research, prepare, validate Iteration 1 Gather user information for iterations 2-5 Implement high dev cost low UI cost features Groundwork for Design
  31. 31. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Iteration 1: Learning Track Development Support: Ship Software Problem Solving: Interaction Design Learning: Research, prepare, validate Iteration 1 Gather user information for iterations 2-5 Implement high dev cost low UI cost features Groundwork for Design Research sprinkles down ideas so that designs can continue to grow 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧 🌧
  32. 32. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Iteration 1: Learning Track • Learning informs all future work as appropriate Development Iteration 1 Problem Solving Learning Gather user information for iterations 2-5 Groundwork for Design Implement high dev cost low UI cost features
  33. 33. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Iteration 2: Development Support • Make verified interaction design a reality Development Iteration 1 Iteration 2 Problem Solving Learning Gather user information for iterations 2-5 Groundwork for Design Implement designs Implement high dev cost low UI cost features
  34. 34. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Iteration 2: Problem Solving • Work on next problems to solve. • Create prototype for usability testing. Iteration 2 Learning Development Problem Solving Iteration 1 Gather user information for iterations 2-5 Groundwork for Design Implement designs Implement high dev cost low UI cost features Design for Iteration 3
  35. 35. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Iteration 2: Learning • Continue research • Set up study for next iteration Development Problem Solving Learning Iteration 1 Iteration 2 Gather user information for iterations 2-5 Groundwork for Design Implement designs Implement high dev cost low UI cost features Design for Iteration 3 Gather user info and plan studies
  36. 36. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Iteration 3: Development • Continue implementing new features. • Technical debt, etc. as needed. Iteration 3 Development Problem Solving Learning Iteration 1 Iteration 2 Gather user information for iterations 2-5 Groundwork for Design Implement designs Implement high dev cost low UI cost features Gather user info and plan studies Implement designs Design for Iteration 3
  37. 37. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Iteration 3: Problem Solving • Integrate research findings. • Work on next problems to solve. Iteration 3 Development Problem Solving Learning Iteration 1 Iteration 2 Gather user information for iterations 2-5 Groundwork for Design Implement designs Implement high dev cost low UI cost features Implement designs Gather user info and plan studies Design for Iteration 3 Design for Iteration 4
  38. 38. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Iteration 3: Learning • Run usability study on prototype • Field studies for detailed information needed for upcoming iterations Iteration 3 Development Problem Solving Learning Iteration 1 Iteration 2 Gather user information for iterations 2-5 Groundwork for Design Implement designs Implement high dev cost low UI cost features Gather user info and plan studies Implement designs Design for Iteration 3 Design for Iteration 4 Run usability study and UXR (4-7)
  39. 39. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Research made Agile • How do you fit Research in? • Consumer Interviews - Usually 2 sprints – Sprint 1: Plan, recruit, start interviews (assumes some pre-work done) – Sprint 2: Complete interviews, analyze, synthesize, report
  40. 40. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic And so on… • Constant communication between tracks is essential for success • These are not just hand-offs Iteration 4 Development Problem Solving Learning Iteration 1 Iteration 2 Iteration 3 Gather user information for iterations 2-5 Groundwork for Design Implement designs Implement high dev cost low UI cost features Gather user info and plan studies Implement designs Design for Iteration 3 Design for Iteration 4 Run usability study and UXR (4-7)
  41. 41. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Dual Track Development is not Duel Track Dual Track Development is not Duel Track, May 10, 2017 By Jeff Patton http://jpattonassociates.com/dual-track-development/
  42. 42. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Constant Communication • Between all tracks is essential for success • Not just hand-offs • All work will not move to development. • Learning efforts must be picked strategically and constantly reviewed for priority alignment with team. • All at once – 3 tracks, not 3 teams
  43. 43. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic During Each Iteration • Be present with developers day to day • Are they building what you expect? • Get their feedback on your designs in progress © Copyright 2014 Desirée Sy & John Schrag. All rights
  44. 44. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Look Back • Validate the work done in previous iteration © Copyright 2014 Desirée Sy & John Schrag. All rights
  45. 45. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Look Ahead • Design [problem solve] for next iteration (n+1) • Research [learn] for future iterations (n+2, n+3…) © Copyright 2014 Desirée Sy & John Schrag. All rights
  46. 46. Focus
  47. 47. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Who will frequently, actively use your product? What do they need to do?
  48. 48. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Designing for Everyone is Impossible
  49. 49. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Who are the Primary users? • What are their goals? • How many are there? • Common complaints/biggest issues? • Most important/frequent tasks?
  50. 50. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Same Job Title, May Differ in… UserExperience Frequency of use Priority of tasks Jobs to be Done Motivations and attitude Expectations
  51. 51. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Case Study • Creating a site for University students • Think about the student you are designing for – What kind of program? – How old are they? – What else?
  52. 52. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Which Student? Rick Connie http://www.flickr.com/photos/mrjkbh/ via http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en http://www.flickr.com/photos/caharley72/ (Christopher Alison Photography) via http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/
  53. 53. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Include PWD in Research • People with disabilities – “We are all only temporarily able-bodied. Accessibility is good for us all.” – Not “disabled” or “handicapped” – Get to spirit of the law (Section 508, WCAG 2.0) • Disability – any condition that impedes the completion of daily tasks using traditional methods (Wikipedia) -@mollydotcom at #stirtrek 2011 via @carologic
  54. 54. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic True Statements • All interfaces have usability problems • Limited resources to fix • More problems than resources • Less serious problems distract • Intense focus on fixing most serious problems first Rocket Surgery Made Easy: The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Finding and Fixing Usability Problems. By Steve Krug
  55. 55. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Usability Testing is… • Representative users • Doing real tasks • Being observed • Using prototypes or live products http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/raphaelquinet/513351385/sizes/l/in/photostream/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/raphaelquinet/
  56. 56. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Tweak, Don’t Redesign • Small iterative changes – Make it better now – Don’t break something else • Take something away – Reduce distractions – Don’t add – question it Rocket Surgery Made Easy: The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Finding and Fixing Usability Problems. By Steve Krug
  57. 57. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Products are better… 1. Partner with team 2. Best practices at smaller scale 3. Clear focus on specific users – provide quick value
  58. 58. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Share What You Learn
  59. 59. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Contact Carol LinkedIn – CarolJSmith Twitter - @Carologic Slideshare – carologic SpeakerRate - CarolJSmith
  60. 60. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Recommended Readings 6 4
  61. 61. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic • Adapting Usability Investigations for Agile User-Centered Design by Desirée Sy • Journal of Usability Studies, Volume 2, Issue 3 (the most-cited paper in JUS) • https://uxpa.org/sites/default/files/agile-ucd_0.pdf
  62. 62. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic Recommended Sites • Usability.gov – https://www.usability.gov/ • W3C Web Accessibility Initiative – http://www.w3.org/WAI/ • Accessibility Standards in US (Section 508) – https://www.access-board.gov/ • Jakob Nielsen – http://www.useit.com • UXPA – User Experience Professionals Association – http://uxpa.org/ • Information Architecture Institute – http://iainstitute.org/
  63. 63. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic References • Albert, Bill, Tom Tullis, and Donna Tedesco. Beyond the Usability Lab. • Barnum, Carol M. (Jan. 2003). What’s in a Number? STC Usability SIG Newsletter, Usability Interface. http://www.stcsig.org/usability/newsletter/0301-number.html Retrieved: 20080323 • Beyer, Hugh. User-Centered Agile Methods (Synthesis Lectures on Human-Centered Informatics) • Cato, John. User-Centered Web Design. Addison Wesley Longman; 2001. • Dini, Dino. (March 2008). Wikipedia: Design. 2005 Game Design and Technology Workshop, Liverpool JM University. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design Retrieved on 2008-03-23. Retrieved: 20080323 • Faulkner, Christine. The Essence of Human-Computer Interaction. Prentice Hall PTR; 1997. • Gale, S. A Collaborative Approach to Developing Style Guides. Conference proceedings on Human factors in Computing Systems April 13 - 18, 1996, Vancouver Canada. ACM Press, (pp. 362-367). • Gaffney, Gerry. (2000) What is Card Sorting? Usability Techniques Series, Information & Design. http://www.infodesign.com.au/usabilityresources/design/cardsorting.asp
  64. 64. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic References • Galitz, W. O. (2002). The essential guide to user interface design: An introduction to GUI design principles and techniques (Second Edition). Wiley: New York, NY. • Gothelf , Jeff. http://blog.usabilla.com/5-effective-ways-for-usability-testing-to-play-nice-with-agile/ • Grudin, J. 1989. The case against user interface consistency. Commun. ACM 32, 10 (Oct. 1989), 1164-1173. • Hackos, JoAnn T., PhD and Redish, Janice C. User and Task Analysis for Interface Design. Wiley; 1998. • Henry, Shawn Lawton. Just Ask: Integrating Accessibility Throughout Design. • Henry, S.L. and Grossnickle, M. Accessibility in the User-Centered Design Process. Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Inc; Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 2004. http://uiaccess.com/accessucd/personas.html • Henry, S.L. and Martinson, M. Evaluating for Accessibility, Usability Testing in Diverse Situations. Tutorial, 2003 UPA Conference. • Kuniavsky, Mike. Observing the User Experience: a Practitioner's Guide to User Research. Morgan Kaufmann, 2003. • Krug, Steve. Rocket Surgery Made Easy: The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Finding and Fixing Usability Problems.
  65. 65. Product Design in Agile Environments / @carologic References • Lewis, Clayton and Rieman, John. (1993, 1994) Task-Centered User Interface Design A Practical Introduction. http://hcibib.org/tcuid/chap-4.html • Mandel, Theo. The Elements of User Interface Design. Wiley; 1997. • Neisser, Ulric. (1967) Cognitive Psychology • Nielsen, Jakob and Robert L. Mack. Usability Inspection Methods. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1994. • Powell, Thomas A. The Complete Reference: Web Design. Osborne/McGraw-Hill; 2000. • Ratcliffe, Lindsay and Marc McNeill. Agile Experience Design: A Digital Designer's Guide to Agile, Lean, and Continuous. • Rubin, Jeffrey and Dana Chisnell. Handbook of Usability Testing: How to Plan, Design, and Conduct Effective Tests. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. • Schaffer, Eric. Institutionalization of Usability: A Step by Step Guide. Human Factors International, 2004. • Slatin, John M. and Sharron Rush Maximum Accessibility: Making Your Web Site More Usable for Everyone. Addison- Wesley Pub Co., 2002. • W3C Web Accessibility Initiative - http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/accessibility

×