The universal tapestry

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The universal tapestry

  1. 1. The Universal Tapestry
  2. 2. Synchronicity implies wholeness and meaningful relationships between causallyunconnected events Or at least from our limited perception that is how itappears eighty5nine . I am so intrigued by the vastness of the Universe. Iget lost in the powerful images that come to us through the HubbleTelescope as it speeds through time and space far beyond our reach.
  3. 3. Science has been rediscovering the view of the world as an unbroken fabric inwhich seemingly separate events do not occur in isolation, but form piecesinterwoven into a common tapestry. Wholeness as an idea is emerging as amajor theme of our cultural. South African philosopher and states man JanSmuts articulated this view in his book Holism and Evolution back in 1926.He told us that the cosmos was formed of wholes, each interlacing withothers to form larger, interconnected tapestries. He explains from hisviewpoint that these structures are not static, but evolve toward increasinglyinclusive complex, and even creative forms. He called this picture of theuniverse of interwoven and evolving wholes "holism" after the Greek halomeaning whole.
  4. 4. Biologist Rupert Sheldrakes theory of morphic fields continues this conversation inmodern terms. Morphic fields are a network of resonance that form webs of mutualinfluence beyond the usual limitations of space and time. I am fascinated by histheories. There is so much more to life than any of us understand or know. Thatthrills me. I am curious about the nature of our true reality and environment.Anumber of scientists have studied animals and their ability to learn or know taskswithout contact with the trained animals. One famous example of this remote"shared learning" occurred in Britain, where milkmen for over one hundred yearshave left bottles of milk undisturbed at the doors of homes in the early hours ofdawn. But in 1921 this all changed. Rupert Sheldrake discusses the behavior of asmall bird called the blue tit in the town of Southampton, England in his book ThePresence of the Past. A small number of these birds learned how to open bottlesof milk. There were even reports of blue tits following delivery trucks and breakinginto bottles while the drivers made deliveries. By 1937, eleven species of birds hadbegun this activity, and it spread to eighty-nine different cities in England. Then thejump occurred.
  5. 5. Strangely enough, milk bottles were not used in Holland during the years ofWorld War II, and were only reintroduced in 1947. None of the blue tits alivethen could have ever seen a milk bottle, and as soon as the milk bottlereappeared the blue tits began to attack them. Certain facts point toSheldrakes theory of morphic resonance in the spread of this behavior. Bluetits are birds that do not usually travel far from their breeding place; but thehabit of opening the milk bottles appeared at a number of locations far fromthe previous cities. Sheldrake estimated that the habit must have beenrediscovered independently at least eighty-nine times in the British Islesalone. Also as this behavior began to be practiced by more numbers ofbirds, it spread with increasing speed, suggesting a quantum leap asnumbers increased.
  6. 6. Strangely enough, milk bottles were not used in Holland during the years ofWorld War II, and were only reintroduced in 1947. None of the blue tits alivethen could have ever seen a milk bottle, and as soon as the milk bottlereappeared the blue tits began to attack them. Certain facts point toSheldrakes theory of morphic resonance in the spread of this behavior. Bluetits are birds that do not usually travel far from their breeding place; but thehabit of opening the milk bottles appeared at a number of locations far fromthe previous cities. Sheldrake estimated that the habit must have beenrediscovered independently at least eighty-nine times in the British Islesalone. Also as this behavior began to be practiced by more numbers ofbirds, it spread with increasing speed, suggesting a quantum leap asnumbers increased.

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