Early Release – December 9, 2010
 
<ul><li>The 2011 FCAT Reading Test for 9thand 10thgrade students will be based on the 2007 NGSSS.  </li></ul><ul><li>The 2...
<ul><li>The measure of how closely a set of standards represents the content and cognitive demand necessary for students t...
Subject Area Language Arts Grades 9-10 Strand Reading Process Standard “ The student uses multiple strategies  to develop ...
Grade Vocabulary Reading Application Literary  Analysis Fiction/Nonfiction Informational Text/ Research Process 9-10 15–25...
Teach Only What is Assessed
 
Instructional Tools Ensure Discussion And Active Learning!
see    gaze   glimpse  peek  spot   notice   glare   stare  peep  glance witness  observe distinguish
Formal       Positive  Negative           Informal
Other Ways To Say. . . Word Analysis mean best describes relate to the information phrase best describes convey the meanin...
What do the two characters have in common? What is the most important lesson  she learns from the article? Important skill...
 
<ul><li>Author’s Purpose and Perspective </li></ul>Let’s look at these… Perspective – Point of View…  With which statement...
<ul><li>Persuasive Techniques </li></ul><ul><li>Testimonial </li></ul><ul><li>Citing Authority </li></ul><ul><li>Citing St...
<ul><li>Persuasive writing seeks to convince readers that the writer’s views are correct.  </li></ul><ul><li>Newspaper edi...
<ul><li>An  argument  is a reasoned discussion of an issue that presents a particular point of view or position.  </li></u...
How does the author’s perspective affect the meaning of the article? Explain how the author uses information to persuade r...
 
Other Ways To Say…. Main Idea Relevant Details Conclusions Inferences Coming Soon! summary  lesson retell  moral portion  ...
Based upon Rachel Carson’s view on endangered natural resources, how would the author react to the BP oil spill? The pelic...
Cause & Effect Other ways to say... cause   might happen if  results factor   influence reason(s)  decide particular actio...
flashback or foreshadowing What are the text structures In narrative & informational texts? Text Structure Text Features T...
Knowing how the author structured the text improves comprehension! Text Structure and Organizational Patterns  Other ways ...
<ul><li>The more things change,  </li></ul><ul><li>the more they stay the same… </li></ul>Other ways to say… Compare Contr...
 
Text Features Other ways to say… subtitles caption photograph help the reader understand conclude caption be most appropri...
Poetry Historical Fiction Editorials Speeches  Memoirs Diaries Fiction  Myths Short Stories
<ul><li>Theme  </li></ul><ul><li>Setting </li></ul><ul><li>Plot </li></ul><ul><li>Characterization </li></ul><ul><li>(prot...
 
Plot Development Other ways to say… MAIN problem resolution  solved resolved  lead to indicates  events plans  face (verb)...
Understanding how the character is developed by the writer helps the reader understand the events of a text. <ul><li>CHARA...
Mood:  The feeling or atmosphere the writer creates for the reader… Imagery -  Language that appeals to one or more of the...
<ul><li>Cover to Cover </li></ul><ul><li>Look at the cover.  </li></ul><ul><li>Write down what you see. </li></ul><ul><li>...
 
<ul><li>Rainsford, a famous big game hunter, falls overboard  off South America and is unable to catch up with the yacht. ...
<ul><li>Write down what you see. </li></ul><ul><li>Write down emotion words. </li></ul><ul><li>Write a sentence using one ...
The student will  identify  and  interpret  the author’s use of figurative language and  determine  how it impacts meaning!
<ul><li>Shuffle-shlump.  Shuffle-shlump.  Shuffle-shlump, shlumped bleary-eyed Oliver out of bed, down the hall, and into ...
 
 
Instructional Tools for Text Features Text Features Other ways to say… illustrations section show describe titled
Reporting Category 3 Reporting Category 4 What elements of Seabiscuit's dramatic finish are captured by this photograph?  ...
Other Ways To Say … supports argument greatest benefit conclusion evidence reasons behind most valid reliable sound depend...
Question Task Cards <ul><li>HIGH SCHOOL QUESTION TASK CARDS </li></ul><ul><li>VALIDITY & RELIABILITY OF INFORMATION </li><...
Apply Identify Identify What is the greatest benefit of van Roosmalen’s research? According to the information, what is th...
What is the issue?
<ul><li>Synthesize Information </li></ul><ul><li>Author’s Purpose & Perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze and Evaluate Inf...
 
<ul><li>All educator-related materials  http://fcat.fldoe.org/fcatpub2.asp </li></ul><ul><li>FCAT 2.0 Test Design Summary ...
 
<ul><li>3  things you learned or was clarified for you today </li></ul><ul><li>2  things you are interested in learning mo...
<ul><li>Implement a reading activity using one of the strategies discussed in today’s workshop. </li></ul><ul><li>Send 1 s...
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High School Reading Standards

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  • Excellent! I would love to have the documents embedded in your ppt. If you would like to share my email is elizabeth.levy@polk-fl.net. Thanks!
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  • Highlights of the components of school grading: 50% of a school’s grade will be based on the FCAT-related factors in S.1008.34(3)(a) The remaining factors include: Graduation rate of at-risk students who scored at Level 2 or lower on the grade 8 FCAT Reading and Mathematics examinations; The postsecondary readiness of the students as measured by the SAT, ACT, or the CPT; Performance and participation of students in Advanced Placement (AP) courses, International Baccalaureate (IB) courses, dual enrollment courses, Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) courses and the achievement of industry certification (IC) in a career and professional academy; The performance of a school’s students on statewide standardized end-of-course assessments approved by the Dept. of Education; The annual growth or decline in these components.
  • Senate Bill 4 – passing score will be at level 3, 300 will be reset April 2011 still 300 points 11 th and 12 th graders will continue to take old test 10 th graders if retakers will take 2.0 – 300 points 14,000 retakers at district level Multiple-choice items only. 2010 field test items were written to measure 2007 standards. To the extent possible, 2011 tests will use items from the field test that are the most closely aligned with the draft 2009 standards and Common Core. Mostly non-copyrighted texts, including public domain materials (e.g., The Bill of Rights, Twain, O’ Henry, etc). More cognitive rigor.
  • Read the slide and connect benchmark discussion and student performance to the idea that the FCAT 2.0 is more RIGOROUS. Students will be expected to perform at a higher level to meet proficiency.
  • The two letters in the first position of the code identify the Subject Area (e.g., LA for Language Arts). The number in the second position (first number) represents the Grade Level . The number in the third position (second number) represents the Strand , or category of knowledge, to which the benchmark belongs. The Standards were revised in an effort to provide a depth of understanding to what teachers should teach and what students should be able to do The Standards were revised in an effort to provide a depth of understanding to what teachers should teach and what students should be able to do.
  • FCAT 2.0 Reading Tests Grades 3 – 10 More cognitive rigor. Note: Level of rigor increases because more items MAY come from the informational text category.
  • Do NOT restrict the curriculum to just what is tested. Discuss some of the unintended outcomes of only teaching what is tested: Formulaic writing Narrowed curriculum Less exposure to broader literacy concepts. STRESS the importance of teaching ALL the standards in order to prepare students for advanced reading tasks. Remember that a passing score of 300 on the FCAT equates to an average reader. Teachers should be striving to prepare a well-rounded student for strenuous real-world reading tasks.
  • Discuss the importance of vocabulary instruction and how it should be taught through their curriculum. Best way to improve vocabulary is through reading . PUSH independent reading and classroom libraries.
  • Discuss the addition of 1.6.7 and 6.11 tested benchmarks. Discuss why the teaching of root words, prefixes and suffixes is important to vocabulary development. Should teach the most commonly taught root words, prefixes and suffixes. There is NO LIST, but tell participants there are many resources available. Check in published curriculum materials (i.e., McDougal Littell materials and Language reading programs have many activities). Refer Participant to the rest of the strands. Have them look for spiraling, what changes, was has increased rigor and highlight what and where it is tested – FCAT, FAIR or BOTH Commonalities -Salient features Vocabulary is tested on FAIR on Comp section, MAZE and a little in word analysis… Refer to packet for graphic organizers
  • Walk through different vocabulary strategies. Ask what other strategies can be used to teach benchmark. What other resources are available? Becks’ “Brining Words to Life” and District’s “Wild About Words”
  • How can we sort these words so students can remember the appropriate situation to use them?
  • Use the words from the previous slide to fill out the word array. Have participants draw word array on their paper and place the words appropriately. Discuss and share.
  • Explain why and how task cards were developed. Question stems were identified from previously released FCAT assessments…. Discuss how question task cards should be used as an instructional tool in the classroom. Review and discuss a few types of the question stems.
  • This is the biggest category and a variety of items are from this category because there are several benchmarks covered.
  • Walk through and discuss each instructional resource. Ask what other strategies can be used to teach benchmark.
  • Author’s purpose content focus has added benchmarks to increase rigor. Requires students to read text more deeply and understand author’s intent, perspective and agenda. The next slides discuss focusing instruction on author bias.
  • Logical appeals use reasons, facts, and other evidence to back up the author’s position or views. Emotional appeals try to stir readers’ feelings. Writers often use words that stir up strong feelings in favor of their position. The tone of the author’s language often evokes a mood in the reader to help promote the author’s argument. Ethical appeals use a generally accepted standard of right and wrong to persuade. Students need to be taught to distinguish between persuasion and propaganda. The arguments in persuasion are fair. The arguments in propaganda are unfair. Propaganda is persuasion taken to the extreme. Its purpose is to stir the emotions so strongly that emotions outweigh reason.
  • Walk through each type of persuasive techniques and provide some examples of a few: Testimonial – famous people claim that something is good or advertises or promotes a product, even though they are not experts – and may be getting paid to endorse an idea. EXAMPLE: A pro football player claims a particular deodorant is best. Citing Authority – an author may quote an expert person to lend credibility to his argument. Citing Statistics – Author may list statistics to lend importance to his argument. Bandwagon – Persuades people to do something so they won’t be left out. EXAMPLE: Everybody’s going to the game Friday night. Glittering Generalities – Uses words that have favorable meanings to make product sound better. EXAMPLE: Snack food is described as “wholesome and nutritious”. OR “Many people believe….” (How many? Who are these people?) Name calling – words are used to have unfavorable meaning to describe a person or idea.
  • Direct participants to their materials packet for reporting category 2. Using the persuasive techniques charts, read the article “The media’s Katrina malpractice” in order to identify examples of the author’s use of persuasive and biased rhetoric.
  • Walk through instructional resources. Prediction has been added to increase level of rigor. Prediction questions will require the reader to “step outside the text” in order to apply the information.
  • Prediction questions will be content focused.
  • Walk through the instructional resources.
  • Walk through instructional resources – explain the importance in both reading and writing. temporal means chronological, of time or sequential Narratives by nature have a sequential order, They follow a plot line (problem/solution) However some authors begin with the end and tell the story as a flashback. We need to draw our students attention to this and ask, How do you know? What words does the author use to tell you this?”
  • Walk through instructional resources.
  • STRESS that comparison may be made across texts, between different types of text (poetry and biographies) as well as within text (compare nutritional differences between apples and oranges).
  • Review and discuss a few types of the question stems. Ask what other strategies can be used to teach benchmark.
  • Refer back to the types of passages on FCAT Clarify the difference between fiction and non-fiction Poems, fables, and plays can be expected to make up only a small portion of the texts used on FCAT Reading Mostly non-copyrighted texts, including public domain materials (e.g., The Bill of Rights, Twain, O’Henry, etc.). The distinction between literary nonfiction and information is very significant now.. It helps you teach the difference between 221 and 611 (text Features). Functional materials are new to FCAT. Previously they were tested on SAT only Brief discussion on public domain.
  • Stress that rigor increases by grade level. For example in benchmark 2.15 - the subgroups of hyperbole, symbolism, allusion and imagery are taught in 9-10, while satire, parody and allegory are taught in 11-12.
  • Walk through and discuss each instructional resource. Ask what other strategies can be used to teach benchmark. Review and discuss a few stems.
  • Walk through and discuss each instructional resource. Ask what other strategies can be used to teach benchmark. Tone, irony, mood, imagery, alliteration, onomatopoeia, allusion, satire, common idioms, mythological and literary allusions, symbolism and figurative language will be tested. Students will be asked to explain how they impact meaning in a variety of texts.
  • The purpose of this activity to emphasize mood and imagery in passages. Guide the participants through the Cover to Cover strategy in preparation for them to practice the strategy on another piece. Cover to cover is both the front cover and the back cover… You’re noting details and building vocabulary… A man walking in the mist; a tree, a shadowy area…)… Add inferences- Fear, anxiety, suspense, mystery (you are drawing conclusions here) Write a sentence using these words (you’ve made a prediction)… We’re moving into mood, preloading possible vocabulary and most certainly words that can be used in writing about this, responding to the text, making meaning from what you see…
  • Have participants find the terrifying events in the story – fly in as they are found… NOTING THIS HELPS SET THE MOOD and how this focus is continuous- throughout the piece – supported throughout the piece… Next page of LB book!
  • Participants will now practice the Cover to Cover strategy using Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Pit and the Pendulum” The participants will have a summary of the story in their packet for reference. Cover to cover is both the front cover and the back cover… You’re noting details and building vocabulary… A terrified man tied to a table, a monk with a torch, a huge pendulum, a dark shadowy pit…)… Add inferences- Fear, anxiety, death, murder (you are drawing conclusions here) Write a sentence using these words (you’ve made a prediction)… We’re moving into mood, preloading possible vocabulary and most certainly words that can be used in writing about this, responding to the text, making meaning from what you see…
  • macabre – ma·ca·bre - /məˈkɑbrə, -ˈkɑb, -ˈkɑbər/ [muh-kah-bruh, -kahb, -kah-ber] Also, ma·ca·ber. – adjective 1. gruesome and horrifying; ghastly; horrible. 2. of, pertaining to, dealing with, or representing death, esp. its grimmer or uglier aspect. 3. of or suggestive of the allegorical dance of death. Synonyms - cadaverous, deathly, dreadful , frightening , frightful, ghastly , ghostly , ghoulish, grim , grisly, gruesome , hideous , horrible , horrid , lurid , morbid , offensive , scary , spookish, spooky , terrible , unearthly , weird Origin: 1400–50; &lt; F; cf. late ME Macabrees daunce  &lt; MF danse  ( de ) Macabré,  of uncert. orig.; perh. to be identified with ML chorēa Machabaeōrum  a representation of the deaths of Judas Maccabaeus and his brothers, but evidence is lacking. OR….from Old French danse macabre  dance of death, probably from macabé  relating to the Maccabees, who were associated with death because of the doctrines and prayers for the dead in II Macc. (12:43--46) People or things: gothic art, sinister criminals, menacing monsters, ominous events, scythe, drugs, threatening or silent robed and hooded jailers, Black Plague, Spanish Inquisition, fanatical heretics Feelings: terror, doom, alarmed, creepy, nasty, scary, eerie, deathlike, repellant, shocking, nightmarish
  • Walk through and discuss each instructional resource Ask what other strategies can be used to teach the benchmark.
  • Walk through and discuss examples of figurative language. Ask what instructional resources can be used to teach benchmark.
  • Discuss ways to expose students to more of this text Discuss the addition of fuctional test: web sites, how-to-manuals, brochures, etc.
  • Walk through quickly
  • Walk through and discuss each instructional resource. Ask what other strategies can be used to teach the benchmark. IMPORTANT to note that text features aid the reader’s understanding –we must help students to understand this. Explain why author use text features Text Feature: (glossary, headings, charts, graphs, diagrams, illustrations, captions, maps, titles, subtitles, legends, keys) Where I found it: (Page/ Location) What it Tells Me: (Interpret Meaning) How it Helps Me: (Purpose)
  • Moving to category 3 to 4… Use The Most Dangerous Game to illustrate Text Features 2.2.1 Highlight differences between how the features work within literary &amp; informational text
  • Walk through and discuss each instructional resource. Ask what other strategies can be used to teach the benchmark. The text should present information in order to aid the student determination of validity Express a relationship between 2 ideas and text features if possible Reflect ideas that can be analyzed and evaluated
  • Review and discuss a few stems
  • Refer the participants to the reading in their materials packet. Ask participants: Preview the article “Marc van Roosmalen Fights for Biodiversity”. What is the issue? ( how do you know?) Look at the title – there is a fight going on? 2. Identify the text structure. Set a purpose for reading, then read the article. What is Roosmalen researching? Who will benefit? 4. Complete the content frame by locating supporting details from the article.
  • 1 task card per group
  • The table lists examples of literary and informational texts that may be represented on FCAT Reading. Poems, fables, and plays can be expected to make up only a small portion of the texts used on FCAT Reading Mostly non-copyrighted texts, including public domain materials (e.g., The Bill of Rights, Twain, O’Henry, etc.). The distinction between literary nonfiction and information is very significant now.. It helps you teach the difference between 221 and 611 (text Features). Functional materials are new to FCAT. Previously they were tested on SAT only
  • Proposed reading passages are reviewed by Florida educators for quality and grade-level appropriateness. The table shows the number of minutes allowed for the 2011 regular test takers. With the exception of FCAT Writing, and the FCAT Reading and Mathematics Retakes, which must be taken in one day, all tests are administered in two sessions.
  • Use this to close session and review the importance of increasing the rigor and higher-order reasoning in LA/Reading classes.
  • High School Reading Standards

    1. 1. Early Release – December 9, 2010
    2. 3. <ul><li>The 2011 FCAT Reading Test for 9thand 10thgrade students will be based on the 2007 NGSSS. </li></ul><ul><li>The 2011 FCAT will include Performance Task Items for 9thgrade. </li></ul><ul><li>The 2011 FCAT will NOT include Performance Task Items for 10thgrade. </li></ul><ul><li>The 2011 FCAT Reading Test for 11thand 12thgrade re-takers will be based on the 2007 NGSSS. </li></ul><ul><li>The 2011 FCAT Reading tested content clusters will remain the same: Words and Phrases, Main Idea/Plot/Purpose, Cause and Effect/Comparisons, and Reference and Research. </li></ul>
    3. 4. <ul><li>The measure of how closely a set of standards represents the content and cognitive demand necessary for students to succeed ( without remediation ). </li></ul>
    4. 5. Subject Area Language Arts Grades 9-10 Strand Reading Process Standard “ The student uses multiple strategies to develop grade appropriate vocabulary.” Benchmark “ The student will use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words.” LA.910.1.6. 3
    5. 6. Grade Vocabulary Reading Application Literary Analysis Fiction/Nonfiction Informational Text/ Research Process 9-10 15–25% 20-30% 20-30% 25-35%
    6. 7. Teach Only What is Assessed
    7. 8.
    8. 10. Instructional Tools Ensure Discussion And Active Learning!
    9. 11. see gaze glimpse peek spot notice glare stare peep glance witness observe distinguish
    10. 12. Formal       Positive Negative           Informal
    11. 13. Other Ways To Say. . . Word Analysis mean best describes relate to the information phrase best describes convey the meaning imply best restates phrase reveals same meaning word reveals origin of root
    12. 14. What do the two characters have in common? What is the most important lesson she learns from the article? Important skills that apply across genres.
    13. 16. <ul><li>Author’s Purpose and Perspective </li></ul>Let’s look at these… Perspective – Point of View… With which statement would the author most likely agree? Which books would the author of most likely read in order to write this article/story? Purpose – Reason for or intent in Writing… Other Ways To Say. . . Perspective mean most likely most important agree statement author thinks in order
    14. 17. <ul><li>Persuasive Techniques </li></ul><ul><li>Testimonial </li></ul><ul><li>Citing Authority </li></ul><ul><li>Citing Statistics </li></ul><ul><li>Bandwagon </li></ul><ul><li>Glittering Generalities </li></ul><ul><li>Name Calling </li></ul><ul><li>Argument - Appeal </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional </li></ul><ul><li>Logical </li></ul><ul><li>Ethical </li></ul>
    15. 18. <ul><li>Persuasive writing seeks to convince readers that the writer’s views are correct. </li></ul><ul><li>Newspaper editorials, promotional pamphlets, speeches and letters to the editor are some examples of persuasive writing. </li></ul>
    16. 19. <ul><li>An argument is a reasoned discussion of an issue that presents a particular point of view or position. </li></ul><ul><li>The position is for or against something. </li></ul><ul><li>When authors make an argument, they back up their line of reasoning with facts, expert opinions, examples, and statistics in order to persuade their audience to buy into or agree with their stand. </li></ul>
    17. 20. How does the author’s perspective affect the meaning of the article? Explain how the author uses information to persuade readers to that ____. Media Criticized For Biased Hometown Sports Reporting Global Warming Bias Creating controversy where science finds consensus
    18. 22. Other Ways To Say…. Main Idea Relevant Details Conclusions Inferences Coming Soon! summary lesson retell moral portion passage good title essential message primary topic central idea most important contribute to the idea relevant details support Idea which what when where conclusions imply infer might happen if most likely take summary statement summarize prediction predict expect
    19. 23. Based upon Rachel Carson’s view on endangered natural resources, how would the author react to the BP oil spill? The pelican’s recovery is largely due to the ban of the pesticide DDT in 1972. This was done after former Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Rachel Carson published Silent Spring . She alerted the nation to the dangers of pesticide use.
    20. 24. Cause & Effect Other ways to say... cause might happen if results factor influence reason(s) decide particular action because Doc, what caused this to happen to me?
    21. 25. flashback or foreshadowing What are the text structures In narrative & informational texts? Text Structure Text Features The temporal and spatial arrangement of elements in a written, oral, or visual text. For example, the text structure of a narrative film might involve moving back and forth among different time periods recounting events: or the text structure of an argumentative essay might involve a linear arrangement of definitions, arguments, evidence, counterarguments, and rebuttal. The common forms of text structure or organizational patterns found in written text include compare/contrast , cause/effect , chronological order , and argument/support . Design elements that include the organized structure of a text and help make the key ideas and supporting information understandable. Text features include headings, text boxes, subheadings, boldface type, italic type, bulleted or numbered lists, sidebars, and graphic aids, such as charts, tables, timelines, illustrations and photographs.
    22. 26. Knowing how the author structured the text improves comprehension! Text Structure and Organizational Patterns Other ways to say… main organizational structure organize information to illustrate help visitors find information additional paragraph connection between connect the ideas develop the text different from other sections
    23. 27. <ul><li>The more things change, </li></ul><ul><li>the more they stay the same… </li></ul>Other ways to say… Compare Contrast alike similar similarities both common compare different difference(s) change before/after beginning end
    24. 29. Text Features Other ways to say… subtitles caption photograph help the reader understand conclude caption be most appropriate chart map diagram sub-heading illustration graph bold-print words best supported
    25. 30. Poetry Historical Fiction Editorials Speeches Memoirs Diaries Fiction Myths Short Stories
    26. 31. <ul><li>Theme </li></ul><ul><li>Setting </li></ul><ul><li>Plot </li></ul><ul><li>Characterization </li></ul><ul><li>(protagonist/antagonist) </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict (internal or external) </li></ul><ul><li>Figurative language </li></ul><ul><li>Theme </li></ul><ul><li>Point of view </li></ul><ul><li>Descriptive </li></ul><ul><li>language </li></ul><ul><li>Tone </li></ul><ul><li>Mood </li></ul><ul><li>Allusion </li></ul><ul><li>Satire </li></ul>
    27. 33. Plot Development Other ways to say… MAIN problem resolution solved resolved lead to indicates events plans face (verb) CHARACTER & PLOT DEVELOPMENT/ POINT OF VIEW/ SETTING/ CONFLICT RESOLUTION/ TONE (LA.910.2.1.5, LA.910.2.1.7) <ul><li>PLOT DEVELOPMENT </li></ul><ul><li>How do ______’s comments contribute to the development of the story/article? </li></ul><ul><li>What events lead to the resolution? </li></ul><ul><li>CONFLICT </li></ul><ul><li>What is the main conflict in the essay? </li></ul><ul><li>When is the central conflict between ____ and _____ introduced in the story/poem? </li></ul><ul><li>RESOLUTION </li></ul><ul><li>What in the passage indicates that the conflict is resolved? </li></ul><ul><li>THEME </li></ul><ul><li>Which statement best describes ’s approach to life? </li></ul><ul><li>Which sentence from the passage mostly expresses its theme? </li></ul><ul><li>Which line from the poem clearly reveals its theme? </li></ul><ul><li>How do the changes in the narrator’s feelings toward ___contribute to the theme? </li></ul><ul><li>SETTING </li></ul><ul><li>How does the setting add to the feeling that ______? </li></ul>
    28. 34. Understanding how the character is developed by the writer helps the reader understand the events of a text. <ul><li>CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT </li></ul><ul><li>How does ­­­­­_____'s character change from the beginning to the end of ___________? </li></ul><ul><li>What word best describes the character? </li></ul><ul><li>What pair of words best describes _______? </li></ul><ul><li>How do the character’s responsibilities affect how he/she reacts? </li></ul><ul><li>What phrase best describes the narrator’s _____? </li></ul><ul><li>Which statement from the essay illustrates the characteristic the author appreciates most about _______? </li></ul><ul><li>How does ___ change ____’s opinion about _____? </li></ul><ul><li>CHARACTER POINT OF VIEW </li></ul><ul><li>How do ____’s comments contribute to the development of the passage/poem? </li></ul><ul><li>What is _____’s opinion of _____? </li></ul>Character Development/Point of View Other ways to say… describe character bother feels change attitude opinion
    29. 35. Mood: The feeling or atmosphere the writer creates for the reader… Imagery - Language that appeals to one or more of the five senses. It consists of descriptive words and phrases that recreate sensory experiences that help the reader imagine exactly what is being described. connotation, details, imagery, figurative language, foreshadowing, setting and rhythm help establish a mood. Watch for the words the author uses to create the mood of the selection… sorrowful joyful anxious shocked peaceful spiritual Watch for the words the author uses to create the mood of the selection… sorrowful joyful anxious Watch for the words the author uses to create the mood of the selection… sorrowful joyful anxious shocked peaceful spiritual
    30. 36. <ul><li>Cover to Cover </li></ul><ul><li>Look at the cover. </li></ul><ul><li>Write down what you see. </li></ul><ul><li>Write down emotion words. </li></ul><ul><li>Write a sentence using one of the sentence starters: </li></ul><ul><li>I think this represents. . . </li></ul><ul><li>The idea I am getting is. . . </li></ul>The Most Dangerous Game by Richard Connell … A good writer creates a mood that is evident throughout the piece and not just at the beginning…
    31. 38. <ul><li>Rainsford, a famous big game hunter, falls overboard off South America and is unable to catch up with the yacht. </li></ul><ul><li>Rainsford swims toward Ship-Trap Island reputed by sailors to be a Godforsaken place. </li></ul><ul><li>Rainsford follows footsteps to Zaroff’s chateau, knocks and is greeted by a giant who is pointing a pistol. </li></ul><ul><li>Ivan the Tartar is a huge deaf mute who is very dangerous. </li></ul><ul><li>Rainsford finds jungle weeds and moss tramped down and stained crimson indicating a struggle between large prey. </li></ul><ul><li>General Zaroff is dangerous, threatening and a bit unpredictable. </li></ul><ul><li>The island’s owner, General Zaroff, practices the hunting of humans. </li></ul><ul><li>Rainsford finds himself the object of General Zaroff’s diabolical hunt. </li></ul>
    32. 39. <ul><li>Write down what you see. </li></ul><ul><li>Write down emotion words. </li></ul><ul><li>Write a sentence using one of the sentence starters: </li></ul><ul><li>I think this represents. . . </li></ul><ul><li>The idea I am getting is. . . </li></ul>… A good writer creates a mood that is evident throughout the piece and not just at the beginning…
    33. 40.
    34. 41. The student will identify and interpret the author’s use of figurative language and determine how it impacts meaning!
    35. 42. <ul><li>Shuffle-shlump. Shuffle-shlump. Shuffle-shlump, shlumped bleary-eyed Oliver out of bed, down the hall, and into the bathroom. </li></ul><ul><li>And two toast toasties did triple back flips onto the breakfast table. </li></ul><ul><li>Milk was spilled, spit, and sputtered. </li></ul><ul><li>Looked just like a cat’s coughed-up fur ball. </li></ul><ul><li>Oliver’s hair was out of control. Way out of control. </li></ul>onomatopoeia alliteration personification simile hyperbole <ul><li>How is the author comparing Oliver’s hair to an animal? </li></ul><ul><li>Read the sentence from the poem. </li></ul><ul><li>“ And two toast toasties did triple </li></ul><ul><li>back flips onto the breakfast </li></ul><ul><li>table.” </li></ul><ul><li>3. What characteristic applies to the toast? </li></ul>
    36. 45. Instructional Tools for Text Features Text Features Other ways to say… illustrations section show describe titled
    37. 46. Reporting Category 3 Reporting Category 4 What elements of Seabiscuit's dramatic finish are captured by this photograph? What does the photo add to your understanding of the story?
    38. 47. Other Ways To Say … supports argument greatest benefit conclusion evidence reasons behind most valid reliable sound dependable The student will organize, synthesize, analyze, and evaluate the validity (i.e., correctness or soundness) and reliability(i.e., dependability ) of information from multiple sources. The student may be asked to apply information from a text in a valid and/or reliable way. What will I use to instruct this benchmark? Look for text that: -takes a position -states a specific issue Uses scientific research or expert opinions, surveys , data or information from books. <ul><li>Editorials </li></ul><ul><li>Scientific articles </li></ul><ul><li>Current events issues </li></ul>Sources need to be reliable and credible to provide evidence!
    39. 48. Question Task Cards <ul><li>HIGH SCHOOL QUESTION TASK CARDS </li></ul><ul><li>VALIDITY & RELIABILITY OF INFORMATION </li></ul><ul><li>(L.A.910.6.2.2) </li></ul><ul><li>Which sentence from the article best illustrates the__________? </li></ul><ul><li>Which sentence form the article best explains why ___ appeals to ________ ? </li></ul><ul><li>Which statement best indicates that_________________? </li></ul><ul><li>What qualifies __________as an expert to provide information about_____________? </li></ul><ul><li>According to the information in the article, what is the most valid argument for ___________? </li></ul><ul><li>Which statement best supports the idea that_____________? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the greatest benefit of ? </li></ul><ul><li>What evidence supports _____________________________? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the best evidence that ? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the strongest evidence in support of ______ theory? </li></ul><ul><li>According to the evidence in the article, ______________? </li></ul><ul><li>What does the author use to support the points he/she makes about___________? </li></ul><ul><li>The author appears qualified to claim that________ because he______? </li></ul><ul><li>What arguments does the author use to ______________? </li></ul><ul><li>HIGH SCHOOL QUESTION TASK CARDS </li></ul><ul><li>ANALYZE & EVALUATE INFORMATION </li></ul><ul><li>(LA.910.6.2.2) </li></ul><ul><li>Based on all information given, how does each part add to the idea that ? </li></ul><ul><li>The homepage of ______ webpage would be useful for the following purposes EXCEPT __________? </li></ul><ul><li>Which aspects of _____ ’ s homepage would be most helpful in writing a research report about _______? </li></ul><ul><li>How do and suggest the central idea that ? </li></ul><ul><li>According to the information given (including the chart, graph, etc.) about __________ , which pair of ________ would _________? </li></ul><ul><li>People who read this article will learn to/that ? </li></ul><ul><li>How does the concept in article relate to the concept in the article ? Use details from and to support your answer. </li></ul><ul><li>What factors should _____consider when making decisions about____? </li></ul><ul><li>Read this sentence from the passage/article </li></ul><ul><li>“ ____________________________ ” </li></ul><ul><li>Explain how the author ’ s own experiences support this idea. </li></ul>
    40. 49. Apply Identify Identify What is the greatest benefit of van Roosmalen’s research? According to the information, what is the MOST VALID argument for biodiversity ? For what could the information in the article best be used?
    41. 50. What is the issue?
    42. 51. <ul><li>Synthesize Information </li></ul><ul><li>Author’s Purpose & Perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze and Evaluate Information </li></ul><ul><li>Compare and Contrast </li></ul><ul><li>Validity and Reliability of Information </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Pattern </li></ul><ul><li>Main Idea </li></ul><ul><li>Text Features in Informational Text </li></ul><ul><li>Vocabulary/Context Clues/Multiple Meanings </li></ul><ul><li>Cause and Effect </li></ul>Question Task Cards
    43. 52.
    44. 54. <ul><li>All educator-related materials http://fcat.fldoe.org/fcatpub2.asp </li></ul><ul><li>FCAT 2.0 Test Design Summary http://fcat.fldoe.org/pdf/designsummary.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>FCAT 2.0 Reading Content focus http://fcat.fldoe.org/fcat2 </li></ul><ul><li>FCAT 2.0 Item Specifications http://fcat.fldoe.org/fcatis01.asp </li></ul><ul><li>Reading Grades 6-8 http://fcat.fldoe.org/pdf/specifications/ReadingGrades6-8.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Reading Grades 9-10 http://fcat.fldoe.org/pdf/specifications/ReadingGrades9-10.pdf </li></ul>
    45. 56. <ul><li>3 things you learned or was clarified for you today </li></ul><ul><li>2 things you are interested in learning more about or 2 questions you still have </li></ul><ul><li>1 thing you feel is the most important thing we can do together to help our students succeed in school </li></ul>
    46. 57. <ul><li>Implement a reading activity using one of the strategies discussed in today’s workshop. </li></ul><ul><li>Send 1 student sample from the lesson to Mrs. Concepcion. </li></ul><ul><li>Reflection to blog: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategy used </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Connection to comprehension </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comments, questions, insights </li></ul></ul>

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