IPv6 Transition Considerations for ISPs

401 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

IPv6 Transition Considerations for ISPs

  1. 1. IPv6 TransitionConsiderations for ISPsCarlos  Mar)nez  carlos  @  lacnic.net  @carlosm3011  
  2. 2. Topics•  Common network architectural patterns– Core / backbone– Last mile– Border•  Transition approaches•  Transition technologies
  3. 3. Network ArchitectureCore  /  Backbone  LM  LM  LM  LM  Internet  B  B  
  4. 4. Transi)oning  to  IPv6  •  Different  aspects  – Human  /  Organiza)onal  •  Awareness  of  the  problem  •  Training  •  Organiza)onal  adequa)on  –  Sales  –  Provisioning  procedures  – Technical  •  Obtaining  your  IPv6  prefix  •  Equipment  needs  •  Network  management  
  5. 5. Ini)al  Steps  •  You  will  need  to  develop  a  plan  and  a  schedule  •  Get  familiar  with  the  “new”  protocol  – No  need  for  formal  training  (at  least  yet)  •  Know  your  network  – Have  a  clear  picture  of  what  your  network  is  running  •  How  am  I  rou)ng  traffic  ?    •  Which  transport  /  backhaul  /  last  mile  technologies  do  we  use  ?  – Assess  your  equipment  (brands,  OS  versions)  
  6. 6. Developing  a  Plan  •  Address  different  aspects  – Do  we  need  formal  training  ?  Do  we  have  in-­‐house  know-­‐how  ?    •  Consider  not  only  hard  core  engineering  but  sales  and  support  staff  as  well  – Do  we  need  equipment  and/or  so_ware  upgrades  ?  – Do  our  transit  /  peering  sessions  support  IPv6  ?  •  Most  do,  but  you  have  to  ask  for  it  
  7. 7. Phase  1:  Planning  •  (Source:  6Deploy  Training  Slides)  •  Add  IPv6  capability  requirements  to  future  tenders  –  Ensure  you  have  capability  to  deploy  •  Obtain  IPv6  address  space  from  your  ISP/NREN  (LIR)  or  from  your  RIR  if  you’re  a  ISP  –  Typically  a  /48  size  prefix  (from  the  LIR)  –  And  a  /32  size  prefix  (from  the  RIR)  •  Arrange  IPv6  training  •  Encourage  in-­‐house  experiments  by  systems  staff  –  e.g.  using  Tunnel  Broker  services  •  Review  IPv6  security  issues  –  IPv6  is  o_en  enabled  by  default  -­‐  your  users  may  be  using  IPv6  without  your  knowledge…  
  8. 8. Phase  2:  Testbed  /  Trials  •  (Source:  6Deploy  Training  Slides)  •  Deploy  IPv6  capable  router,  with  cau)ous  ACLs  applied  •  Establish  connec)vity  (probably  a  tunnel)  to  your  ISP  •  Set  up  an  internal  link  with  host(s),  on  a  /64  –  Can  be  isolated  from  regular  IPv4  network  (e.g.  a  dual-­‐stack  DMZ  running  IPv4  and  IPv6  together)  •  Enable  IPv6  on  the  host  systems,  add  DNS  entries  if  appropriate  •  And  in  parallel  –  Survey  systems  and  applica)ons  for  IPv6  capabili)es    –  Formulate  an  IPv6  site  addressing  plan  –  Document  IPv6  policies  (e.g.  address  assignment  methods)  
  9. 9. Phase  3:  Produc)on  Rollout  •  (Source  6Deploy  Training  Slides)  •  Plan  ini)al  deployment  areas,  e.g.  your  exis)ng  IPv4  DMZ  or  WLAN  may  be  good  first  steps  –  Prudent  to  enable  IPv6  on  the  wire  first,  then  services  •  Enable  external  IPv6  connec)vity  and  ACLs/filters  •  Enable  IPv6  rou)ng  ‘on  the  wire’  on  selected  internal  links  •  Deploy  IPv6  support  in  management/monitoring  tools  •  Then  enable  the  services  and  adver)se  via  DNS:  –  Enable  IPv6  in  selected  services  (e.g.  web,  SMTP)  –  Add  IPv6  addresses  to  DNS,  enable  IPv6  DNS  transport  •  Remember  IPv6  security:  –  e.g.  include  IPv6  transport  in  all  penetra)on  tests  
  10. 10. Transi)on  Approaches  •  Dual-­‐Stack  – Servers  and  routers  speak  both  protocols  •  “Island”  Interconnec)on  (tunneling)  – IPv6  “islands”  interconnected  using  tunnels  •  Can  be  the  other  way  around,  too  •  Transla)on  methods  – Protocol  transla)on  (rewri)ng  IP  headers)  – TCP  relays  /  Web  Proxies  
  11. 11. Dual-­‐Stack  •  We  say  a  device  is  “dual-­‐stacked”  when  its  so_ware  runs  both  network  protocols  Applica)on  Layer  TCP  /  UDP  IPv4   IPv6  
  12. 12. Dual-­‐Stack  •  How  does  the  device  “know”  which  path  to  use  ?  The  key  is  in  the  DNS:  – Use  appropriate  A  /  AAAA  records  to  signal  clients  which  path  to  use  in  order  to  get  to  a  given  service  •  Both  paths  can  be  present  -­‐>  “Happy  Eyeballs”  •  Issues  – Hosts  with  broken  IPv6  connec)vity  – Performance  /  failover  
  13. 13. Transi)oning  the  Core  •  Usually  the  easiest  part  •  Devices  – Chances  are  your  core  equipment  already  supports  IPv6  •  Issues  – Numbering  plan  •  Now  is  the  )me  for  obtaining  your  IPv6  prefix  !  – Plan  your  rou)ng  protocol  •  iBGP  /  OSPF  v2  /  OSPF  v3  gotchas  – Traffic  monitoring  •  Nemlow  
  14. 14. IPv6  Numbering  Plans  •  Numbering  plans  for  IPv6  are  based  on  a  different  mindset  •  Remember  – One  subnet  /  VLAN  gets  a  /64    •  No  need  to  manage  scarcity  anymore  – Host  count  per  subnet  (as  we  did  in  IPv4)  is  now  meaningless  – Subnet  count  is  what  maoers  •  Allow  for  growth  
  15. 15. Transi)oning  the  Border  •  Devices  – Mostly  same  as  the  core  •  Transit  /  Peering  – You  need  to  ask  (some)mes  forcefully)  for  IPv6  transit  •  The  good  news  is  that  most  Tier  1  &  Tier  2  carriers  do  support  IPv6  •  BGP  issues  – One  session  or  two  ?    •  Two  sessions  seems  to  be  the  norm    
  16. 16. Transi)oning  the  Border  •  BGP  issues:  – One  session  or  two  ?    •  BGP  can  transport  NLRI  data  for  IPv4  and  IPv6  regardless  of  the  session’s  protocol  –  It  impacts  nex-­‐hop  calcula)ons,  but  it’s  easily  solvable  – ACLs  •  Other  issues:  – Traffic  monitoring  •  SNMP  /  NetFlow  – ACLs  •  Mar)ans  /  bogons  
  17. 17. Transi)oning  the  Last  Mile  •  Different  access  scenarios  – Datacenter    •  Including  hos)ng  /  coloca)on  services  – WAN  users  •  Corporate  •  Residen)al  – Last  mile  technologies  •  DSL  •  Wireless  /  Mobile  •  FTTH  /  PON  
  18. 18. Transi)oning  the  Datacenter  •  Devices  –  Routers  /  switches  and  servers  usually  do  not  present  a  problem  –  Firewalls,  your  mileage  may  vary  •  Usually  support  is  good  enough  •  Odd  pimalls  here  and  there  •  Rou)ng  /  WAN:  same  as  border  /  core  •  Recommenda)on  is  to  start  by  layers,  going  from  the  outside  to  the  inside  –  See  hop://tools.iem.org/html/dra_-­‐lopez-­‐v6ops-­‐dc-­‐ipv6-­‐04      
  19. 19. Corporate  Users  •  Usually  more  sophis)cated  •  May  have  in-­‐house  technical  exper)se  •  May  even  request  IPv6!  •  Higher-­‐end  CPE,  more  likely  to  support  IPv6  •  Numbering  – Remember:  one  VLAN  ==  one  /64  – How  many  VLANs  per  customer  ?    •  /48  ~  65536  VLANs  
  20. 20. Residen)al  Customers  •  CPEs  –  Cut-­‐throat  race  to  the  booom  on  cost  –  Usually  feature-­‐limited    •  Even  for  IPv4  •  CPE  installed  base  is  definitely  a  roadblock  •  Recommenda)on  –  Add  IPv6  support  as  a  requirement  for  future  CPE  purchases  –  Deploy  alterna)ves  for  older  CPEs  •  6RD  •  Users  not  sophis)cated,  need  to  factor  in  possible  support  calls  
  21. 21. Residen)al  Customers  •  Numbering  – Remember:  one  VLAN  ==  one  /64  – How  many  VLANs  per  customer  ?    •  /48  ~  65536  VLANs  •  /56  ~  256  VLANs  •  /60  ~  16  VLANs  •  DHCP  Prefix  Delega)on  
  22. 22. Other  Networks  •  Enterprise  /  Corporate  – Usually  use  proxies  and  other  layers  of  security  devices  – Two  different  problems,  to  be  addressed  separately  •  IPv6  access  to  the  Internet  for  internal  users  •  IPv6-­‐enabling  company  services  •  University  Campus  – Usually  heavily  wireless-­‐based  
  23. 23. References  •  RFC  6180:  “Guidelines  for  transi)on  mechanism  usage  during  IPv6  deployment”  – hop://tools.iem.org/html/rfc6180    •  “IPv6  Opera)onal  Considera)ons  for  Datacenters”  – hop://tools.iem.org/html/dra_-­‐lopez-­‐v6ops-­‐dc-­‐ipv6-­‐04    
  24. 24. THANK YOU !

×