Test Your Brain Knowledge

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Part of the free online professional development opportunity, the Electronic Village Online, session "Neuroscience in Education".
http://hottopicselt.pbworks.com

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  • The brain actually learns to juggle the two lges.This myth is based on the assumption that brains have a limited learning capacity, which they reachduring language acquisition at some point. If the brain is “filled” with one language, parts of the firstlanguage must be lost, when a second language is acquired. It is possible to compare the languagecenter of the brain with a cup: if the cup is already filled with coffee, it should not be filled up withtea. If this is done, nevertheless tea will be in the cup, but less coffee, and the whole drink will bemessed up.Arguments against this myth1. There are many everyday examples to contradict this myth. Neuroscientific knowledge is notabsolutely necessary to debilitate this myth. Every-day knowledge is sufficient: According to thismyth, nobody should be able to speak several languages perfectly, because nobody’s brain has spacefor another language. Someone like Cardinal Giuseppe Mezzofanti, who was fluent in ten languages atthe age of 12 and in 40 languages at the end of his life, should therefore not exist. The same can besaid for Sir Richard Francis Burton who spoke 25 to 30 languages so well, that he was oftenconsidered to be a native speaker.2. Increased knowledge of one language can come along with increased knowledge of anotherlanguage. Studies showed that students who learnt one foreign language in school do not becomeworse in their native tongue. On the contrary, with regular lessons, it is possible for students toameliorate in both languages.
  • A.K.A. “The Mozart Effect”In 1993, a small study showed that college students who listened to Mozart and then took an IQ test got higher scores than those who didn’tThe effect wore off in 15 minutes and hasn’t been repeated Learning how to play a musical instrument has been shown to enhance cognitive skills in the long termImproves concentration, self-confidence, and coordination
  • A.K.A. “The Mozart Effect”In 1993, a small study showed that college students who listened to Mozart and then took an IQ test got higher scores than those who didn’tThe effect wore off in 15 minutes and hasn’t been repeated Learning how to play a musical instrument has been shown to enhance cognitive skills in the long termImproves concentration, self-confidence, and coordination
  • Test Your Brain Knowledge

    1. 1. Read the sentences and decideif they are correct or incorrect.
    2. 2. http://hottopicselt.pbworks.com

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