Definition of Instructional Technology

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  • Definition of Instructional Technology

    1. 1. A DEFINITION OF THE FIELD OF INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY Presented by Carla Kaiser EDIT 6100, Fall 2010Thursday, March 15, 2012
    2. 2. WHAT IS INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY?  Instructional Technology is a field of practice. It is a concept.  There is not one universally accepted definition of the term “instructional technology.”  This presentation will focus on key components of common practices followed by practitioners within the field of instructional technology.Thursday, March 15, 2012
    3. 3. THE PURPOSE OF INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY  Humans have always sought ways to improve instruction by using physical and mental representations (eg, technology) to better explain complex ideas.  The desire to enhance education with technology has existed for thousands of years.  The scholarly study of this emerged in the 20th century. It is called Instructional Technology. Source: lecture notes: Michael Orey, PhD.Thursday, March 15, 2012
    4. 4. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY  Facilitates learning.  Does not cause or control learning.  Learning is a process, as is instruction.  Immersion and authenticity are key components of effective learning.  “Learning” means different things to different people. Instructional technologist needs to understand the clients’ perspective and the learning goals.Thursday, March 15, 2012
    5. 5. FACILITATING LEARNING, IMPROVING PERFORMANCE  Appropriate human and nonhuman resources are used to solve human learning problems  Resources include media, technology, people, and ideas.  Appropriateness of resources is determined by availability, accessibility, and audience’s learning preference.Thursday, March 15, 2012
    6. 6. DESIGN  Being thoughtful and considerate of the audience, their learning preferences, and the tools and skills that are now available to them.  The design goal is to create learning products/situations where effective learning is less difficult and more fun.Thursday, March 15, 2012
    7. 7. DESIGN GOALS  Appealing to the audience  Accessible and convenient to the audience  Considerate of audience’s skill set and their available technology  Learning or performance improvement takes place as a result of audience’s participation in the experience created by an instructional technologist.Thursday, March 15, 2012
    8. 8. TECHNOLOGY  Not the same as innovation.  Be aware of innovation, keep an eye on the trends, and stay ahead of the audience in terms of timing and adaptation of new technology.  Don’t be afraid to stick with what works, and don’t be afraid to try new technology. Be flexible.Thursday, March 15, 2012
    9. 9. Thursday, March 15, 2012
    10. 10. MANAGING THE EXPECTATIONS  Communication is a crucial aspect of a successful instructional technology practice.  The IT practitioner communicates effectively. The client has realistic expectations about what can and cannot be achieved by the application of instructional technology.  Before the learning/instruction process begins, the IT practitioner asks questions to determine which design tactics will best serve the needs of the client and audience.  The IT practitioner manages the audience’s expectations in terms of what they are expected to be able to do or learn as a result of their participation in the learning experience developed by the instructional technologist.Thursday, March 15, 2012
    11. 11. ASSESSMENT & RESULTS  In most cases, there will be some type of assessment to prove the need for instruction, and/or to prove the effectiveness of the instruction.  Because learning is a process, and each situation is different, the “results” of an instructional technologist’s work may be difficult to measure.Thursday, March 15, 2012
    12. 12. THE PROCESS OF USING INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGYThursday, March 15, 2012
    13. 13. SOURCES Orey, Michael (2010). Introduction to Instructional Technology [Lecture and Power Point]. September 1, 2010. https://www.elc.uga.edu/webct/urw/lc5122011.tp0/cobaltMainFrame.dowebct Barbour, Michael. Orey, Michael. Foundations of Instructional Technology [Wiki]. September 2, 2010. retrieved from http://projects.coe.uga.edu/ITFoundations/index.php?title=Main_Page Images: illustrated by Carla KaiserThursday, March 15, 2012

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