WRAAA Conference 6/3/09

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Independent Living through Silver Industries and Tecvhnology

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  • Advances in healthcare have led to huge changes in the ways healthcare is deliveredThe advent of LBJ’s Medicare Program first Federal recognition of these changing demographicsDelivery system changed with technological advancesHouse calls and country doctors replaced with mega hospitals filled with specialistsChanging systems = changing costs
  • Easy Living Houses-Frank will discuss this in greater detail.SRES Designation (w/i last 10 years)
  • Marketing messages must hit the markMature market(boomer market) is a “moving target”Need to be sensitive to the changing special needsSensitive to how the Boomer market views itselfHealthiness and fitness
  • AARPInsurance ProductsCruisesAARP discountsRestaurants Special menus (large print)Special pricing at earlier hoursGrocery storesSenior discount cardsRetail EmployersPublixHome Depot
  • Third Age Suits20-30 somethings to experience what aging is likeDesign changesInfrared night vision systemsSliding steering wheelsAdjustable pedalsLarger instrument clusters
  • It’s all because of those changing demographics we saw earlierOlder patients living longer
  • Here is where industries in their infancy matured and completely new industries emerged to fill unmet needs due to these changing demographics.
  • Entire new industries created due to need SMMTechnological advancements made in devices available
  • Home healthcare industry began to really grow in 1980’s. Families were previously the caregivers. Now looking outside the family. Families busy (sandwich generation) living out of town (country) Explosive growth began in 1980’s B4 that families were the primary care providersWorking Mom’s, “sandwich generation”
  • Senior Move Management IndustryAvoid RSSStarted by “baby boomers” seeing an unmet need in the mid 1990’s.Our goal is to ease the physical and emotional aspects of a later life move, while delivering of our services with compassion and respect. National Association of Senior Move Managers (NASMM)founded in 2002.Oversee all aspects of the project (move).Help with sorting and organizingDetermine what will fit in the new home.Arrange for disposal of unwanted items.Schedule and coordinate with moving companySupply all packing material and packFully unpack and resettle the new homeBegan in late 90’sNow NASMM has 600+ members
  • Support available by professionals for daily financial choresAs we age these chores become more and more difficult to manageComplex information is bombarding our older adultsScams aboundSecond set of eyes
  • Equitable Use -THE DESIGN IS USEFUL AND MARKETABLE TO PEOPLE WITH DIVERSE DISABILITIES.Flexibility in Use - THE DESIGN ACCOMMODATES A WIDE RANGE OF INDIVIDUAL PREFERENCES AND VARYING FUNCTIONAL ABILITIESSimple and Intuitive Use - USE OF THE BUILDING IS EASY TO UNDERSTAND, REGARDLESS OF THE USER’S EXPERIENCE, KNOWEDGE, LANGUAGE SKILLS OR CURRENT CONCENTRATION LEVEL.Perceptible Information - THE DESIGN COMMUNICATES NECESSARY INFORMATION EFFECTIVELY TO THE USER, REGARDLESS OF AMBIENT CONDITIONS OR THE USER’S VARYING INTELLECTUAL OR SENSORY ABILITIES.Tolerance for Error - THE DESIGN MINIMIZES HAZARDS AND ADVERSE CONSEQUENCES OF ACCIDENTAL OR UNINTENDED ACTIONS BY ALL USERSLow Physical Effort - THE DESIGN CAN BE USED EFFICIENTLY AND COMFORTABLY WITH A MINIMUM OF FATIGUE BY EVERYONE. Size and Space for Appropriate Use - SIZE AND SPACE IS PROVIDED FOR APPROACH, REACH, MANIPULATION, AND USE REGARDLESS OF USER’S BODY SIZE, POSTURE, OR FUNCTIONAL ABILITIES/MOBILITY
  • One floor living is optimal!! Any extra 1st floor space that converted to a laundry room or bedroom would greatly reduce unnecessary risk.Older homes often have narrow doors and hallways. If the resident is wheelchair bound, wider doorways and archways may help in navigating the home. Eliminating excess doors and installing appropriate handrails may reduce risk as well.Increased lighting and adjustment to the lighting fixtures by utilizing dimmable switchesSmaller toggle light switches can be replaced with larger easier to operate paddle switches and located where the user can more easily turn appliances and lights (off & on).If necessary, construct a ramp/deck in the back or front yard. Make sure it’s durable, has railings on both sides at a level that is comfortable and appropriate for the user. The ramp surface should be made with a slip resistant material. (practical for older pets as well).Covered entrance ways at front and back doors will keep walking surfaces safer while exiting or entering the home.
  • WRAAA Conference 6/3/09

    1. 1. Keeping Older Adults Independent, Productive, and Connected. wraaa Expo June 3, 2009
    2. 2. James M Stevens, President Caring Transitions, Inc. Frank Kuhar, Jr., Owner Revived Housing Developers
    3. 3.  Independent living is not doing things by yourself, it’s being in control of how things are done for you. (Author Unknown)
    4. 4. Older Traditional Adults Silver Product or Service Unique Industry Needs
    5. 5.  The number of Americans age 65 + is expected to increase from 34 million in 1995 to 62 million by 2025.  More people are over 65 than are in their teens and people are over 85 than under 5 (Lamm & Lamm 2002)  12 million elders will require care by 2020 (Brubaker and Brubaker)
    6. 6.  The percentage of Americans 65 and older has risen to 12.6 percent, or 37.9 million, as of 2007, from 12.4 percent, or 35 million, in 2000. (U.S. Census Bureau.)  Americans aged 85 and older comprise the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population  The U.S. population aged 65 and older will jump nearly 80% when the baby boomer generation retires.
    7. 7.  Healthcare  Real Estate  The Media/Advertisers  Retail  Automobile  Pharmaceuticals
    8. 8.  Largest impact of all  Medicare of 1960’s  Living longer  Delivery systems have changed  Sky rocketing costs
    9. 9.  Easy Living Homes promote  “Visitability” and Aging In Place  Senior Real Estate Specialists (SRES)  Understand aging clients special needs
    10. 10.  Market is shifting  The younger generation has aged  The mature audience has arrived  A more sensitive attitude has developed  Careful of insulting images  Stereotyped “senior”
    11. 11.  “The Market” = Older Adults  Growth of AARP products and services  Restaurants  Drug Stores  Grocery stores  Many now employ seniors
    12. 12.  Empathetic Engineers  Third Age Suits  Technological Innovation  Adaptive design changes  Wider door openings  Grab bars  Knobs and buttons
    13. 13.  Senior Market accounts for 40% of all prescription drugs  New Government programs  Medicare Part D  Other prescription drug plans  CVS Free medication reviews for seniors  Drug companies sponsoring exercise and health awareness clinics
    14. 14.  The goal is to stay independent, productive, and connected to family in familiar surroundings.  Modifying the home  Providing in home services  Supportive Services and Devices
    15. 15.  Non Medical Services  Senior Move Management Services  Bill paying and financial chores  Adaptive devices
    16. 16.  Reasons for the growth of this industry  Social isolation is a common problem among the elderly  Many older adults only need help with everyday activities  IL, AL, and SNF’s are often not affordable  Most seniors prefer to age in place  Services provided  Assistance with ADL’s  Meal prep  Companionship  Housekeeping  Errands
    17. 17.  Helping families cope with life’s third most stressful event Moving = Change = Stress  Emerging industry filling a gap.  Our goal is to ease the physical and emotional aspects of a later life move, while delivering our services with compassion and respect.
    18. 18.  Help with day-to-day financial chores  Services tailored to the needs of the older adult  Bill paying  Tracking medical claims  Reconciling bank accounts  Help in navigating the “system”  Work in conjunction with other professionals
    19. 19.  Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) •Adding grab bars •Installing higher toilets •Upgrading to a curb-less shower •Widening doorways •Constructing ramps or lowering thresholds •Enhance lighting by adding more lighting with adjustable controls
    20. 20. Certified Aging-In-Place Specialist  The CAPS designation identifies remodelers that have been trained to help retirees and older adults remain in their homes safely, independently and comfortably, regardless of income or ability level, and continue to live in a familiar environment throughout their maturing years.  The Remodelers Council of the National Assoc. of Home Builders (NAHB) in collaboration with NAHB Research Center, NAHB Seniors Council and AARP created the CAPS Program.
    21. 21. Universal Design defined…  “An approach to the development of products and environments that can be used effectively by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design” ( North Carolina State University, 1997 )
    22. 22. Principles of Universal Design  Equitable Use  Flexibility in Use  Simple and Intuitive Use  Perceptible Information  Tolerance for Error  Low Physical Effort  Size and Space for Approach and use.
    23. 23. Things to Consider  Consider how the alterations will affect the re-sale value of your home  Consider the cost of the alterations versus the cost of a senior community
    24. 24. It affects us all… “It is likely that everyone of us will experience some type of physical challenge in our lifetime”. A range of needs & abilities throughout the life span  Young children ----- Older adults  People of short stature----Tall people  Thinner people ----Heavier people  People with temporary----permanent disabilities
    25. 25. Attractive, Accessible Remodeling VISITABILITY  The ability for ALL people to visit, socialize, live in a residential setting, “age in place”.  Focus on homes, not public accommodations as covered by the ADA
    26. 26. Making the Home Accessible & Safe  Adaptive Technology  Fire Alarms/Carbon Monoxide Detectors  Entrances/Exits  Kitchens  Bathrooms  Flooring  Lighting  Home Layout
    27. 27.  Automated pill dispensers (connected to monitoring services).  Alarm monitoring services that monitor movement or lack of movement. They keep an eye on water intrusion, HVACs equipment, smoke and carbon monoxide.  Intercoms with cameras give residents a way to screen solicitors at the front door.  Technology to allow adult children to monitor the homes HVACs, medical data and visually check on mom or dad through cameras and web cams.  Biometric & code operated entry door locks.  Fire suppression hoods that shut off fuel/power to stove and extinguish fire.
    28. 28. Entrances , Exits, Exterior  Residential automated door openers with remote control  Covered entrances  Attached garages, detached garages with breezeways, or heated sidewalks  Standing gardens-elevated vegetable gardens or flower beds
    29. 29.  Remote controlled exhaust hood  Pull down shelf units (Rev a shelf) –pull up shelves for lower cabinet  Pot fillers and well placed sinks  Sit-down workspaces for food prep (perfect place for 2nd sink)  Induction cook top and front mounted controls prevent burns and scalding  Elevate dishwasher to elevate back strain  Well placed outlets (front mounted)
    30. 30.  Threaded (hose ready) spigots in the shower area  Tilting mirrors  Preset water temp shower faucets  Hands free sink faucets  Tub cut-retrofit option for older bathtubs  Humidity, motion, and timer controlled exhaust fans  Universal designed bathtub.  Walk in bathtubs  Personal toilet seats/bidets
    31. 31. Examples of remodeling for accessibility
    32. 32. More examples…
    33. 33.  Reduce or eliminate glossy/hard surfaces—this will help reduce slipping, sun glare and puddles  Low pile carpet with minimal padding  Minimize any elevation differences throughout  Use softer flooring options-such as linoleum and cork  Contrast-used to differentiate edges, danger, and level changes
    34. 34.  As much natural light as possible (Vitamin D).  Adjustable direct and indirect lighting.  Up down/down up miniblinds to minimize sun glare.  Night lights-soft light that guides residence from bedrooms to bathrooms safely. Stairs are also danger zones.  Motion/infrared activated lighting.  Garage door openers can initiate lights inside the home.
    35. 35. Laundry room  Elevated half shower washing station – can be used to bathe pets and water plants  Elevated front load washer & dryer with laundry carts and folding table
    36. 36.  Lever door handles and wired drawer pulls over knobs.  Pilot light switches used to indicate on/off status.  Swing away hinges.  Wider hallways and doorways.  Use easier to open windows that are well placed .  Appropriately placed shelving (kitchens, baths, adjustable closet rods).  Natural gas generators for backup emergency power.

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