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How to say numbers, prices, dimensions, dates and times for tourism

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Learn how to say numbers in English to tell a price, a date, a time, or describe a monument. With translations in French!

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How to say numbers, prices, dimensions, dates and times for tourism

  1. 1. Why learn numbers? 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 1
  2. 2. When do you use numbers in tourism? 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 2
  3. 3. To tell the time! 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 3
  4. 4. To tell the date! 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 4
  5. 5. To tell the price! 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 5
  6. 6. To talk about distances! 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 6
  7. 7. To describe monuments and natural features! 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 7
  8. 8. Telling the time Numbers 1,2,3 Telling the price Talking about distances Telling the date Describing a natural feature Describing a monument 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 8
  9. 9. Words on numbers! • Number = figure • Digit (0-9) • Odd numbers: 1,3,5 etc. • Even numbers: 2,4,6, etc. 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 9
  10. 10. Review the numbers from 20 to 99 (check that you are able to write and pronounce them correctly) • 20: twenty • 30: thirty (and 13: thirteen) • 40: forty (and 14: fourteen) • 50: fifty (and 15: fifteen) • 60: sixty (and 16: sixteen) • 70: seventy (and 17: seventeen) • 80: eighty (and 18: eighteen) • 90: ninety (and 19: nineteen) 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 10
  11. 11. Large numbers: hundred. • 100 – a/one hundred • 110 – a/one hundred (and) ten • 999 – nine hundred (and) ninety-nine • Notice: no ‘s’ at the end of ‘hundred’ • Notice: ‘and’ after ‘hundred’ in British English. • Read: ‘There are 5m inhabitants in this country.’ (no ‘of’ after 5 million) 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 11
  12. 12. Large numbers: thousand • 1,000 – a/one thousand • 2,345 – two thousand three hundred (and) forty-five • Notice: no ‘and’ after ‘thousand’ if there is ’hundred’ after • Notice: a comma (,) to separate groups of three digits • Notice: no ‘s’ at the end of ‘thousand’ 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 12
  13. 13. But… • Thousands of people • Hundreds of visitors • Dozens of opportunities • Millions of euros • Tens of thousands of Britons • Scores of tourists 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 13
  14. 14. Very large numbers! • 100,000 – a/one hundred thousand • 1,000,000 – a/one million • 1,000,000,000 – a/one milliard/billion • 123,456,789 – one hundred and twenty-three million four hundred and fifty-six thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 14
  15. 15. Telling the time. • Just say the numbers! Forget ‘past’ ‘to’! • Your train is leaving at 11:40 – eleven forty • The shop closes at 20:30 – twenty thirty or eight thirty pm • The park is open from 9:00 (nine) in the morning to 5:00 (five) in the afternoon. • 12:00 midday, noon, midnight. 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 15
  16. 16. Telling the date. Review the ordinal numbers. • 1st – first • 2nd – second • 3rd – third • 4th – fourth • 5th – fifth 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 16
  17. 17. Review the ordinal numbers. • 6th – sixth • 7th – seventh • 8th • eighth • 9th • ninth • 10th – tenth and then you just continue to add ‘th’ at the end of the numbers (except twenty-first etc.) 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 17
  18. 18. Telling the date. • 15 March 2017 – on the fifteenth of March two thousand and seventeen (or twenty seventeen) • 1800 – eighteen hundred • 2000 – the year two thousand • 1066 – ten sixty-six 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 18
  19. 19. Telling the date. • 1805 – eighteen ‘oh’ five • 46BC – forty-six BC (Before Christ) • 52AD – fifty-two AD (Anno Domini, after Christ) Or more exactly in Latin, Anno Domini Iesu Christi, in the year of our lord Jesus Christ. 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 19
  20. 20. Telling the price. • €45 $456 £1,234 • $7.99 – seven dollars ninety-nine (cents) • £10.99 – Ten pounds ninety-nine (pence) • And in the context of tourism, £150 pp – A hundred and fifty pounds per person • €250 pppn – Two hundred and fifty euros per person per night 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 20
  21. 21. The price in other words! • For transport, use ‘fare’: – Train/rail fare, bus fare, air fare, taxi fare • For tourist attractions, you can speak of entrance/admission fees 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 21
  22. 22. Talking about distances. • How far is Arcachon (from Bordeaux)? • Arcachon is 60 km away (from Bordeaux). • The modern art museum is just a stone’s throw away (from the hotel). • The tram stop is within walking distance of the convention center. • The Galapagos islands are 600 miles off the coast of Ecuador. • The airport is a mere twenty minute drive from the resort. • Local trains run every 20 minutes. 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 22
  23. 23. Describing the dimensions of a monument or a natural feature. • The St Andre cathedral is 407 ft long, 59 ft wide and 75 ft high in the nave and 95 ft high in the chancel (altar area, coeur). • The Garonne river is 1,800ft across/wide in Bordeaux. • At its headwaters (source of a river), the Mississippi is less than 3 feet deep. 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 23
  24. 24. Adjectives and nouns. • Long – Length • High (sometimes tall) – Height • Wide – Width (beam for a boat) • Deep – Depth 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 24
  25. 25. High or tall? • For chimneys, towers, skyscrapers, trees, people and anything else you can think whose height is purely vertical, and rises or grows high compared to others of its kind; native speakers will tend to prefer: tall. Its most common antonym is short. – Ex. The leaning tower of Pisa is only 55.86 meters tall – I am taller than my sister. – The giraffe is the tallest animal • For hills; buildings that are wide as well as tall; walls; women heels; and for objects above (without physical contact) the ground use high. Its antonym is often low. – Six-inch high heel shoes – A high-rise building – The ceiling is 4ft high • Sometimes both adjectives can be used to describe the same object and are both fully acceptable. – The world's tallest tree is hiding somewhere in California. (...) It's 369 feet high 10/15/2014 http://englishfortourism.e-monsite.com/ 25

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