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Position Training Program for
             Host
       Working Efficiently and Accurately

                  Patricia Babl...
Your Training Objectives Will
                Include:
    Orientation

           Crew expectations
      

    Positio...
Vision Statement for Host

       To deliver hospitality you can taste and

       touch by welcoming and seating guests
...
Session 1
Goal and Objective
       The Goal of your job is to welcome and seat guests with

       genuine hospitality.
...
Responsibilities of Host
    Arrive to work on time and ready for work, neat and well groomed,

    according to the stan...
Who Will I Be Working
              Closely With?
       A host is part of FOH which is called front of the

       house...
Session 1 Review
    You should be knowledgeable and confident on these topics:

          Role of a host
     
        ...
Session 2
    Guest Cue                             You May Want to Consider
     Guest in a wheel chair or assisted
    ...
Handling Guest Problems
    Listen- “I hear you…”

        Listen actively
    
        Don’t make excuses
    
       ...
Session 2 Review
You should be knowledgeable and
                                        Answer these questions:
confident...
Concluding Remarks:
       Key Things To Be Aware Of
   Good Personal Hygiene
   Being fresh and clean is what our guests ...
Key Things To Be Aware Of
               Continued
Restaurant Safety
Ensuring guest and crew member safety is everyone’s r...
Works Cited
   Walker, John. Introduction to Hospitality. Pearson
            Prentice Hall. Columbus, Ohio 2009. Pages
  ...
Assessment on the Training
             Program
        Three Components of Assessment

        Training:
       1. Task
...
Task Training
     On the Job training

           Your actually “doing” the job, able to
       
           socialize, ...
Knowledge Training

     You can use lecture for this training part to

     teach a lot of information
           Howeve...
Attitude Training

     Using workshops for attitude training

           They are useful for training employees but they...
Need Assessment
    By using this training program it should benefit the rest of the

    organization because it impleme...
Selecting Trainees and Guidelines
    When selecting the trainees the organization should pre-

    test them to see wher...
Transfer of Training Concept
    You have to make sure the training sticks by implementing

    the following training me...
Evaluation of Training Program
    Training is a powerful way of improving employee’s

    skills, knowledge, and attitud...
Continued Evaluation…
    Reaction Evaluation                               Job Behavior Evaluation
                     ...
Works Cited
       Hall, Pearson. Human Resources

           Management and Supervision. Upper
           Saddle River, ...
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Position Training Program For Hostingp H R I M 256 Class

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Sample Project from Spring 2009 Human Resource management Students.

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Position Training Program For Hostingp H R I M 256 Class

  1. 1. Position Training Program for Host Working Efficiently and Accurately Patricia Babl April 2, 2009 Professor Shearer HRIM 256 1 Babl
  2. 2. Your Training Objectives Will Include: Orientation  Crew expectations  Position Training  You are Training with a certified trainer  here Learning your job  Follow Shift/Skills Observation  Practice new skills  Feedback on your skills  30 Day Review  Meet with manager  Discuss your training experience  Feed back on your performance  2 Babl
  3. 3. Vision Statement for Host To deliver hospitality you can taste and  touch by welcoming and seating guests entering the restaurant and maintaining the cleanliness of the lobby and restrooms. Also to create delight, trust, and magic for guests. 3 Babl
  4. 4. Session 1 Goal and Objective The Goal of your job is to welcome and seat guests with  genuine hospitality. Usually, the host will take the guests’ names and ask for their table  preference if the restaurant is busy. The host maintains a book or chart, showing the sections and  tables so that they know which tables are occupied and which one’s are able to be seated. The Objective of your job, is to escort guests to the tables  conveniently, present menus, and familiarize some special sale promotions to guests. Sometimes you’ll need to remove excess covers from the table .  4 Babl
  5. 5. Responsibilities of Host Arrive to work on time and ready for work, neat and well groomed,  according to the standards Genuinely welcome and greet guests immediately, make eye contact  and smile Find ways to delight guests with personalized service and acts of  caring Own and resolve all guest requests or concerns quickly  Assist in take –out orders and service to guests  Know available tables in dining room, seat guests at best available  table. Walk at the guest pace and engage in conversation Provide accurate small and large party wait quotes  Genuinely thank guests, ask them about their meal and service, and  invite them to return Keep lobby clean and attractive for guests  Ensure tables are ready to be seated  5 Babl
  6. 6. Who Will I Be Working Closely With? A host is part of FOH which is called front of the  house. This includes anyone with guest contact from the host, server, bartender, and dinning room manager. 6 Babl
  7. 7. Session 1 Review You should be knowledgeable and confident on these topics:  Role of a host  Crewmanship in the restaurant  Answer these questions:  Your priority is to deliver a great guest experience by greeting guests, 1. _________ guests and managing the ___________ to keep the dining room full. 2. Our guests expect the restaurant to: 1. Be sparkling __________ 2. Serve the ___________ food 3. Have the ____________ crew 3. Friendly includes the way you treat guests and ________. Talking to guests is one way to make them feel special and let them know that  taking care of people is our passion. List five statements you could say to a guest (or a group of guests) that would prompt a casual conversation. 1. ___________________________ 2.______________________________ 3. ___________________________ 4._______________________________ 5. ___________________________ 7 Babl
  8. 8. Session 2 Guest Cue You May Want to Consider Guest in a wheel chair or assisted  A table in an area where it is easy  by a seeing eye dog to remove a chair to make room for the wheelchair or dog Guest having difficulty walking A table close to the entrance   Guest with an oxygen tank A table away from the smoking   section A quiet area of the restaurant Guest wearing a business suit   A table rather than a booth Larger guest   Might need to find the telephone Guests looking around   restroom, menu, etc. 8 Babl
  9. 9. Handling Guest Problems Listen- “I hear you…”  Listen actively  Don’t make excuses  Don’t assign blame  Don’t be defensive  Apologize- “I apologize…”  Take ownership  Apologize that their experience isn’t what they expected  Explain that you’ll get a manager  Get Your Manager Involved- “Let me get the manager to help…”  Thank the guest for bringing it to your attention  Get your manager  9 Babl
  10. 10. Session 2 Review You should be knowledgeable and Answer these questions: confident on these topics: Connecting with guests in the 1. As guests are leaving, always ask how  their meals was and _____________. lobby When guests have concerns, you should 2. Seating guests, talking with  listen, _____________, and get a them on the way to their table manager to help solve the problem. Accommodating special needs  when seating Now demonstrate the ability to  Keeping lobby and dining room  seat guests clean Greet and connect with guests in the lobby  Handling guest problems  Walk at the guest pace and have a friendly  conversation Identify tables that are ready to be sat  Identify tables that are dirty  10 Babl
  11. 11. Concluding Remarks: Key Things To Be Aware Of Good Personal Hygiene Being fresh and clean is what our guests expect. That includes following our sanitation standards. Taking the self-responsibility to practice good personal hygiene, double check that food is cooked to proper temperature and all work surfaces are clean, will help keep everything fresh and clean. Use deodorant, keep fingernails short and clean, maintain clean teeth, hands, hair  and body Do not touch cooked or ready to eat foods with your bare hands-always use gloves  Wear a clean apron  Do not wipe your hands on your apron  Eat, drink, and smoke only in designated areas  Follow these procedures to wash your hands:  Use a designated hand sink  Wet hands with warm water  Use soap to build up a good lather  Wash both hands thoroughly, up to the elbows, for twenty seconds  Clean underneath fingernails and between fingers  Rinse and dry with paper towel  Always wash your hands after you eat, drink or smoke  Double wash your hands after using the restroom  11 Babl
  12. 12. Key Things To Be Aware Of Continued Restaurant Safety Ensuring guest and crew member safety is everyone’s responsibility. If you see an unsafe condition, fix it and report it to a manager immediately. Situations to look for during your shift:   Nails or splinters sticking out from walls or doors  Unlocked chemical storage areas  Wet floors  Blocked emergency exits  Debris on floor  Hokey's, tray jacks or high chairs in walkways  Chipped/cracked glassware or dishware 12 Babl
  13. 13. Works Cited Walker, John. Introduction to Hospitality. Pearson Prentice Hall. Columbus, Ohio 2009. Pages 238-239. Hall, Pearson. Human Resources Management and Supervision. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation 2007. Pages 160- 165, 178-186 13 Babl
  14. 14. Assessment on the Training Program Three Components of Assessment  Training: 1. Task 2. Knowledge 3. Attitudes 14 Patricia Babl
  15. 15. Task Training On the Job training  Your actually “doing” the job, able to  socialize, and have interaction with workers However, it really matters who is training you as you  follow them around on the job Using technology  With this type of training it is difficult  because there is no insight or processing for the trainee 15 Patricia Babl
  16. 16. Knowledge Training You can use lecture for this training part to  teach a lot of information However, there is no interaction and this is usually timed.  The trainee will get distracted easily and you don’t know if they are actually learning the material. Additionally, using technology to lecture without  paying a lot. However, you are not able to get a response back from  trainee when they have questions or suggestions. 16 Patricia Babl
  17. 17. Attitude Training Using workshops for attitude training  They are useful for training employees but they are  not real life scenarios. You might not get real responses. Using technology for attitude training  You can elaborate on diversity, motivation, personal  health, and age discrimination. However, you really can’t obtain feedback from the trainee this  way. 17 Patricia Babl
  18. 18. Need Assessment By using this training program it should benefit the rest of the  organization because it implements and combines all the training methods into one. For starters, it assures that you will be trained professionally and with a certified trainer, and not all organizations do this. Secondly, it has a thorough break down of what you’ll learn, otherwise known as the objectives. This is key to help trainees understand clearly what they will be taught. When conducting the needs assessment for this it would be great to  have questionnaires, job performance measurements to motivate the trainee, skills test, and performance documents to assure that the trainee is actually learning from the program. This would be great for the trainee because in McClelland's Needs- Achievement Theory they have a need for achievement, power, and affiliation. And if you don’t properly train them and invite them warmly into the company, this could potentially have a bad impact on the company as a whole. 18 Babl
  19. 19. Selecting Trainees and Guidelines When selecting the trainees the organization should pre-  test them to see where their strengths and weaknesses are and go from there. Then again after the training program evaluates them to see the success of the training program so you know they learned the job position. Choose the best set of training methods based on what knowledge that they need to learn and how they learn. To have a good training session the organization needs to motivate the trainee, provide active participation, provide opportunities to practice, allow feedback, and provide means for reinforcement. For effective learning to take place feedback is essential and critical for both learning and motivation. 19 Babl
  20. 20. Transfer of Training Concept You have to make sure the training sticks by implementing  the following training methods: Prepare- prepare the trainee to be motivated to pay attention and learn the  material. Organize your documents so that it is easy to convey the learning objectives, and to introduce the trainee to the content. Present- present the new information at a level that the trainee is able to  understand and learn. Show the tasks, explain what you are doing, and give tips for the job. Provide pictures and diagrams to help the trainee remember what you taught them better. Allow plenty of time for questions and feedback to assure that they are learning and understand the material. Use a variety of real-world circumstance to help them better understand the task. Practice-Show the trainee what you are talking about. Give them a chance  to practice as you observe and advise. Then you are able to immediately communicate what they are doing right or wrong. Perform- Allow the trainee to perform the new skill with on the job training.  Observe and follow up on the task to assure that they are doing it right. After a period of time test them to make sure the training program is a success. You’ll be able to tell if the training program was a waste or worth 20 your time and money. Babl
  21. 21. Evaluation of Training Program Training is a powerful way of improving employee’s  skills, knowledge, and attitudes. It offers many benefits such as improving skills and productivity. Implementing a good training program can really pay off your investments. There are Four Levels of Evaluation that can be applied to  training programs to assure success: Reaction Level Learning Level Job behavior level Organizational impact level 21 Babl
  22. 22. Continued Evaluation… Reaction Evaluation Job Behavior Evaluation   Collect comments from the trainees to The main idea is to change how the job   determine how they felt and if the is actually performed, not just giving training program worked well. This will knowledge to the trainees. It collects provide the organization on whether information from the trainees and they need to make improvements or supervisors showing how well the adjustments. You can use plenty of learning was actually transferred to the things to get this information but a job application. good one is to use a post-training Organizational Impact  reaction form to provide this insight. Evaluation Learning Evaluation  Assesses overall impact of the other  This will gather data about what the  three on the organization as a whole. It trainees have learned. Practice and interview supervisors about performance, the last two of the four costs, benefits, and productivity Ps method, satisfy this level of improvements. Depending on these evaluation. This is accomplished evaluations the organization will be able usually by impartial testing or expert to see if everything went well or if assessment, but can be provided in changes need to be made to the training the form of a written test. or post training. 22 Babl
  23. 23. Works Cited Hall, Pearson. Human Resources  Management and Supervision. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation 2007. Pages 107-199. Shearer, Jeremy. Class Notes. March 26,  2009. 23 Babl

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