Caribbean Studies African retention

2,489 views

Published on

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,489
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Caribbean Studies African retention

  1. 1. AFRICAN RETENTION  Among the main proponents of the African retention school is Melville Herskovits. His main argument is that the slavery did not totally destroy the African culture and that in fact African culture has survived in various forms in the Caribbean to the point were certain cultural phenomenon must be seen in the light of African cultural retention.  Herskovits admits that although not erased, African cultural forms were changed and some lost, however he contends that the African cultural forms are still evident in parts of our cultural lives. He concentrated his work on the examination of the Caribbean family forms.  He contends that African cultural forms survived in three main ways. Firstly through what he called Survivals- cultural forms that closely resemble the original African forms. For example, the practice of burying the umbilical chord of a child and planting a fruit tree over it. Secondly, African retention can be seen in Syncretisms which is the practice of identifying elements in the new culture with parallel components of the old. An example is the practice of identifying Catholic saints with African deities. Finally it survives through what he termed Reinterpretations. This is seen where African culture is reinterpreted to suite the new environment. The cultural practice no longer necessarily looks like traditional retention on the surface but on closer examination, what appears to be a unique West Indian construct is in its essence African retention. An example of this is the reinterpretations of African polygamy as progressive monogamy. He argues that these three forms of survival can be seen as a continuum moving from behaviour that closely resembles African culture (survival) to activities which may not on the surface look like African retention. When reduced to its essence, it obviously becomes an activity influenced by our African past (reinterpretations).  http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/pages/history/story0059.htm

×