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“America” 1700-1763
Settling a New Land –
Becoming a New People
Addresses Indicators 4-2.3, 4-2.4, 4-2.7
Addresses USHC-1 ...
Explorers and Settlers came for
different reasons…
•

•

•

Spanish claimed southern region, rich in minerals.
Their aim w...
America in 1700 looked like this…
•
•

•

There were approximately 250,000
people living in the new land.
People were scat...
Gradually the picture changed…
•

•
•

Settlements and towns were along rivers
for travel, transport, food, safety, and
wa...
John Lawson, Explorer and Author
•
•

John Lawson explored Carolina in 1700 and
wrote a book about his travels.
He praised...
Becoming American…

•

•

When the English settlers arrived in the
new land they considered themselves
as Englishmen but t...
Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)
was a great American leader,
printer, scientist, and writer.
In 1732, he began publishing ...
George Washington
1732-1799
George Washington served
his country during the
fighting in the French and
Indian War. Here he...
Thomas Jefferson
1743-1826
Thomas Jefferson was a
farmer, an inventor, and a
statesman, but he is most
famous as the autho...
But in the early 1700s, these men
knew nothing of what the new land
would become. Something about
living in the rich and i...
The New England Colonies – New
Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island,
Massachusetts (including Maine)
•
•
•

Soil was thin ...
New England Colonies - Social and
Religious Issues
•

•

•

Settled by people seeking
religious freedom, New
England retai...
Governing in New England…
•

•
•

•
•

New England was not governed by a royal
governor, judge, army, or parliament. In th...
The Middle Colonies – New York,
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware
•
•
•

Warmer climate and more fertile soil
made this a...
The Middle Colonies - Social and
Religious Issues

William Penn and others came to the Middle Colonies
seeking religious f...
Governing in the Middle Colonies…
•

•

•

For the most part, the Middle Colonies were not
founded originally by the Engli...
The Southern Colonies – Maryland,
Virginia, North Carolina, South
Carolina, and Georgia
•
•
•

Long growing season, warm c...
The Southern Colonies – Social and
Religious Issues
Circuit riders like Francis Asbury
and John Wesley spread
Methodism in...
Governing in the Southern Colonies…
•

•

Taking their cue from the House of Burgesses,
the Southern Colonies had limited ...
Depending on each other…
•
•
•
•

People in the colonies were usually
friendly and neighborly to each other.
They learned ...
Labor was shared by all...
•
•
•
•
•

Women shared quilting, making syrup,
and preserving foods for the winter.
Men helped...
Religion and Social Behavior…
•
•

•
•

Church was the center of life for settlers.
In Puritan areas the religious ideas w...
The Rich New Land Invited Settlers…
•

•
•
•

French, Spanish, English, Dutch, Germans,
Swedes, and others from Europe all...
French and English settlers fought
alongside their Native American
allies in a bloody conflict over land
The French and Indian War…
•

•

The French and English were almost
always at war and the mid 1750s were no
different. The...
The French and Indian War helped
settlers to become “Americans”…
•
•

Still in 1754 there were many people who
felt themse...
New Leaders began to develop on
the fields of battle…
Daniel Boone fought in the
French and Indian War
along with a man na...
Horatio Gates, a young
officer in the French
and Indian War would
make a name later.

George Washington, a
captain in the ...
Daniel Morgan, a young
wagoner from Virginia, was
at the battle where General
Braddock was killed. He
urged the British to...
General Braddock expected the French and Indians
to fight a pitched battle as the English did. They
would not! Here Braddo...
Braddock’s troops were ambushed trying to drive the French
from Fort Duquesne. Braddock was mortally wounded. George
Washi...
In one battle on one day during the
French and Indian War, colonial
leaders learned not to fight in the
traditional Europe...
Proclamation Act of 1763
The Proclamation Act
was designed to cut
down on expenses for
the British by keeping
settlers fro...
Results of the French and Indian War
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

British territorial claims expanded in America.
British debt grew in a...
Britain’s Parliament felt that the French
and Indian War had been fought to
protect the American colonists…
so the
Colonis...
After peace was declared in 1763,
the taxation began…
•
•

•

It seemed only fair that the colonists should
share in the e...
“America” – 1700-1763
Created by Carol Poole
November 2006
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America 1700 1763

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America 1700 1763

  1. 1. “America” 1700-1763 Settling a New Land – Becoming a New People Addresses Indicators 4-2.3, 4-2.4, 4-2.7 Addresses USHC-1 and USHC-2.1
  2. 2. Explorers and Settlers came for different reasons… • • • Spanish claimed southern region, rich in minerals. Their aim was to get in, get rich, and get out. The Spanish converted the local people to Catholicism. French explorers became fur traders when the water route to the East was not found. They lived in remote areas of Canada trapping and trading. English came looking for a better life. They wanted the right to own some land, a chance to advance their social position and be free, and the right to worship as they chose.
  3. 3. America in 1700 looked like this… • • • There were approximately 250,000 people living in the new land. People were scattered along the coast from Massachusetts down to the Carolinas, usually near the coast. The vast majority of the people lived in rural areas as farmers.
  4. 4. Gradually the picture changed… • • • Settlements and towns were along rivers for travel, transport, food, safety, and water. In 1700, about 5% of the people lived in towns while 95% lived in rural areas. As more people began to arrive they had to move inland to claim land on which to build their homes. Sometimes they came into conflict with the local nations.
  5. 5. John Lawson, Explorer and Author • • John Lawson explored Carolina in 1700 and wrote a book about his travels. He praised the Indians and complained that “We make way for a Christian colony through a Field of Blood.” John Lawson – captured and killed by the Tuscarora
  6. 6. Becoming American… • • When the English settlers arrived in the new land they considered themselves as Englishmen but the longer they stayed, the more that changed. By about 1740, men who would become famous revolutionaries in American history were coming into their own.
  7. 7. Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790) was a great American leader, printer, scientist, and writer. In 1732, he began publishing a magazine called Poor Richard's Almanack. Poor Richard was a make-believe person who gave advice about common sense and honesty. Later in his career Franklin would emerge as a driving force to lead the movement for independence. He also served as ambassador to France, gaining their help in winning the war.
  8. 8. George Washington 1732-1799 George Washington served his country during the fighting in the French and Indian War. Here he is pictured at that time. Washington would go on to serve in the Virginia legislature, the Continental Congress, the Commander of the Continental Army, and the first president of the United States.
  9. 9. Thomas Jefferson 1743-1826 Thomas Jefferson was a farmer, an inventor, and a statesman, but he is most famous as the author of the Declaration of Independence. He also served as the Third President of the new United States and during his time he commissioned the Lewis and Clark Expedition to explore the huge area gained in the Louisiana Purchase.
  10. 10. But in the early 1700s, these men knew nothing of what the new land would become. Something about living in the rich and inviting country made it possible for people to dream big dreams and aspire to amazing possibilities. The different regions began to develop differently.
  11. 11. The New England Colonies – New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts (including Maine) • • • Soil was thin and rocky, not good for farming, also had a short growing season The thick woods provided timber for their own use as well as for products to sell Coastal waters were rich in fish and whales so many turned to the sea
  12. 12. New England Colonies - Social and Religious Issues • • • Settled by people seeking religious freedom, New England retained its religious heritage Puritan ways were strict and harsh - many left to find freedom of worship The government had less power in the beginning than the church. Towns were self-governing. All men participated in government
  13. 13. Governing in New England… • • • • • New England was not governed by a royal governor, judge, army, or parliament. In the beginning the Puritan church was the government This led to being very independent of England. In 1644, the general court of New England was divided into two houses, and became a modern state government - not quite a democracy, but getting close… The government wrote down a body of law and bill of rights, similar to the Bill of Rights. Each colony wrote their own constitution.
  14. 14. The Middle Colonies – New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware • • • Warmer climate and more fertile soil made this area good for growing grains Long, wide rivers made the farm land fertile – “Bread Basket of the Colonies” Rivers helped with trade, transportation, and commerce
  15. 15. The Middle Colonies - Social and Religious Issues William Penn and others came to the Middle Colonies seeking religious freedom. Penn and his fellow Quakers tried to make peace with the Native Americans and other settlers. Social and religious tolerance were found in the Middle Colonies. Towns in the middle colonies governed themselves in the beginning.
  16. 16. Governing in the Middle Colonies… • • • For the most part, the Middle Colonies were not founded originally by the English but by Dutch, Swedes, and other groups who came seeking a better life and religious freedom. All these groups had some form of limited selfgovernment with white, land-owning males taking part in the government. There was more toleration here than in Puritan New England.
  17. 17. The Southern Colonies – Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia • • • Long growing season, warm climate, rich soil - made land in the South productive Small independent farmers could produce food for families and for sale Large wealthy plantations produced cash crops but required massive amounts of slave labor to grow the crops
  18. 18. The Southern Colonies – Social and Religious Issues Circuit riders like Francis Asbury and John Wesley spread Methodism in the South. Presbyterians from Scotland and Ireland came South. Revivals and Camp Meetings made religion a very important part of the social life in the South. The wealthy in the South were like an American aristocracy. They were the social and political leaders controlling how society operated in the South.
  19. 19. Governing in the Southern Colonies… • • Taking their cue from the House of Burgesses, the Southern Colonies had limited selfgovernment through the offices of elected legislatures. The planter class usually prevailed in holding office and carrying out limited government affairs but in most cases there was a royal governor to oversee the legislatures and keep them under British control.
  20. 20. Depending on each other… • • • • People in the colonies were usually friendly and neighborly to each other. They learned this necessity from trying to survive the first attempts at settlement. People depended on each other for their very lives. Some settlements failed completely and in Jamestown there was an 80% casualty rate among the first 10,000 who came to settle.
  21. 21. Labor was shared by all... • • • • • Women shared quilting, making syrup, and preserving foods for the winter. Men helped each other clear fields of rocks and trees and build buildings. One stockman looked after everyone’s cows and other animals. Teaching and caring for the children was shared by the women. Settlers looked after each other if someone was sick or injured.
  22. 22. Religion and Social Behavior… • • • • Church was the center of life for settlers. In Puritan areas the religious ideas were very strict and harsh – “Blue Laws” were offenses that would be punishable – especially on the Sabbath. Laws were bound in a blue book. Other areas were more tolerant but religion played an important role in the settlers’ lives. In the South where people lived far apart, circuit riders carried religion to the people.
  23. 23. The Rich New Land Invited Settlers… • • • • French, Spanish, English, Dutch, Germans, Swedes, and others from Europe all came to settle in the new land. Rivalries developed between different groups. Disputes arose from time to time, especially if the rulers supported their colonies. The most notable of the disputes arose when the French tried to intrude into interior areas claimed and protected by the English.
  24. 24. French and English settlers fought alongside their Native American allies in a bloody conflict over land
  25. 25. The French and Indian War… • • The French and English were almost always at war and the mid 1750s were no different. There was a Seven Years War going on in Europe, and wherever the British and French came into contact. In America this conflict was known as the French and Indian War because the English and their Indian allies were fighting the French and their Indian allies over land in the West.
  26. 26. The French and Indian War helped settlers to become “Americans”… • • Still in 1754 there were many people who felt themselves to be loyal British subjects. They depended on the British to help defend themselves, but they also became something new and special – Americans!
  27. 27. New Leaders began to develop on the fields of battle… Daniel Boone fought in the French and Indian War along with a man named John Finley who told Boone about a pass that would take travelers through the mountains to the West. Boone did not forget John Finley. Note the wide hat to protect from the sun – not a coonskin cap as legend tells it.
  28. 28. Horatio Gates, a young officer in the French and Indian War would make a name later. George Washington, a captain in the French and Indian War learned from the mistakes and became a great leader later.
  29. 29. Daniel Morgan, a young wagoner from Virginia, was at the battle where General Braddock was killed. He urged the British to bury Bradford in the road and run wagons and troops over it so the Indians would not find the body and desecrate it. Morgan and a British officer fought over the comment and Morgan was punished by 500 lashes – he nearly died of his wounds but he lived to repay the British.
  30. 30. General Braddock expected the French and Indians to fight a pitched battle as the English did. They would not! Here Braddock lies wounded near the Monongahela River on the way to Fort Duquesne.
  31. 31. Braddock’s troops were ambushed trying to drive the French from Fort Duquesne. Braddock was mortally wounded. George Washington, a Braddock aide, supervised as Braddock was buried in the road so men and horses could cover the grave.
  32. 32. In one battle on one day during the French and Indian War, colonial leaders learned not to fight in the traditional European style – they would fight as the Indians did.
  33. 33. Proclamation Act of 1763 The Proclamation Act was designed to cut down on expenses for the British by keeping settlers from moving into the mountains – to keep peace in the Indian Territory. The Act slowed westward expansion but only for a short time.
  34. 34. Results of the French and Indian War • • • • • • • British territorial claims expanded in America. British debt grew in an expanding war. Resentment grew as Parliament saw Americans as unwilling to help pay for their own defense. Colonists unified against a common enemy. Colonial militias saw themselves as a "people's army" in contrast to the authoritarian British army. French influence in North America dwindled greatly. TAXATION! .
  35. 35. Britain’s Parliament felt that the French and Indian War had been fought to protect the American colonists… so the Colonists should help pay for the war debts.
  36. 36. After peace was declared in 1763, the taxation began… • • • It seemed only fair that the colonists should share in the expenses for their protection. They objected not so much to the taxation as to the fact that they were not directly represented in the British Parliament. One new tax after another arose until the colonists finally revolted. And there begins another story…
  37. 37. “America” – 1700-1763 Created by Carol Poole November 2006

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