Homebuilt Micro Hydro Turbine

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check out our video of testing our turbine

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Homebuilt Micro Hydro Turbine

  1. 1. MINI-HYDRO. GOING WITHTHE FLOW.Andrew Cannard, Andrew Gonzales, CandaceKaiser
  2. 2. CRITICAL QUESTIONSQuestions about rain water runoff: Is there enough runoff water to produce energy? Can we make a low cost turbine with re-purposed materials? Will this homemade turbine produce any energy?
  3. 3. BENEFITS OF OUR OUR RAINYSEASON Rainwater is an abundant natural resource in our area and can be used to produce energy. http://www.dropyourenergybill.com/archives/1546
  4. 4. BENEFITS OF OUR OUR RAINYSEASON Rainwater is an abundant natural resource in our area and can be used to produce energy. Harnessing rainwater runoff has almost no environmental impact! http://www.dropyourenergybill.com/archives/1546
  5. 5. HOW CAN WE TEST OUR TURBINE? Calculate ideal energy production from a given water source on campus (roof top).http://www.renewcanada.com http://www.renewablesfirst.co.uk
  6. 6. HOW CAN WE TEST OUR TURBINE? Calculate ideal energy production from a given water source on campus (roof top). Compare prices of commercially available turbines with our homebuilt turbine.http://www.renewcanada.com http://www.renewablesfirst.co.uk
  7. 7. HOW CAN WE TEST OUR TURBINE? Calculate ideal energy production from a given water source on campus (roof top). Compare prices of commercially available turbines with our homebuilt turbine. Measure energy production with our homebuilt turbine.http://www.renewcanada.com http://www.renewablesfirst.co.uk
  8. 8. HOW CAN WE TEST OUR TURBINE? Calculate ideal energy production from a given water source on campus (roof top). Compare prices of commercially available turbines with our homebuilt turbine. Measure energy production with our homebuilt turbine. Compare values from calculations and measurements.http://www.renewcanada.com http://www.renewablesfirst.co.uk
  9. 9. CAMPUS SUSTAINABILITY GOALS Promoting Education and Research for the Future  Laying the groundwork  Future students would have a resource as to the effectiveness of on campus micro-hydro
  10. 10. CAMPUS SUSTAINABILITY GOALS Promoting Education and Research for the Future  Laying the groundwork  Future students would have a resource as to the effectiveness of on campus micro-hydro 100% of Electricity at Evergreen is BOUGHT from renewable energy sources  While this is better then not using renewable energy sources, could that money be spent elsewhere?  Successful Micro-Hydro projects could help produce energy on campus
  11. 11. BUDGET CEC awarded us $100 on 12-19-2011 CEC awarded us $440 on 02-01-2012  With certain stipulations  Long term plan for use of the alternator  Required permission for location use.
  12. 12. REAL COSTS…Our costs. Competitors costs. 1 x Renegade 7 Magnet Wind Turbine  500W Low-Head Kaplan Hydro Permanent Magnet Alternator Turbine= $3,875.00 (7MAGPMA)  =  This Kaplan micro hydro turbine can produce power with as little as 2ft of water head level. $249.98+shipping At 10ft of head the turbine will produce 500  7 magnet PMA • 12v charging • comes w watts of power. rectifier  800 watt rating 1 x Wind Turbine PMA Mounting Bracket (MWMB)  = $59.00  Harris Pelton Turbines 4 nozzles =$1,400.00 2x4, brackets, nuts, screws, pvc  Head range: 20 to 600 feet • Flow Range: 4 to 250 GPM • Maximum 12 Volt Power: 700 Watts pipes, , alligator clips and • Maximum 24 Volt Power: 1400 Watts • miscellaneous = $40.00 Maximum 48 Volt Power: 2500 Watts (with additional fan) Turbine wheel = free from bike shop
  13. 13. JUMPING THROUGH HOOPS Challenges  Delays with grant approval process
  14. 14. JUMPING THROUGH HOOPS Challenges  Delays with grant approval process  Finding and ordering appropriate alternator
  15. 15. JUMPING THROUGH HOOPS Challenges  Delays with grant approval process  Finding and ordering appropriate alternator  Cant successfully design frame until the purchase of the main parts
  16. 16. JUMPING THROUGH HOOPS Challenges  Delays with grant approval process  Finding and ordering appropriate alternator  Cant successfully design frame until the purchase of the main parts  Faulty used bicycle parts
  17. 17. JUMPING THROUGH HOOPS Challenges  Delays with grant approval process  Finding and ordering appropriate alternator  Cant successfully design frame until the purchase of the main parts  Faulty used bicycle parts  Lack of rainfall during testing
  18. 18. PREDICTIONS FOR MINI-MICROHYDRO SYSTEM FROM RAINWATERRUNOFF
  19. 19. RoughSketch of    our system               Wheel 1/Bicycle   Wheel:   Outer diameter = 31 inches or 78 cm Wheel 2/Sprocket: Inner diameter = 3.5 inches or 8.9 cm  Wheel 3/Alternator: Diameter = 7 inches or 17cm
  20. 20. RoughSketch                       
  21. 21. OLYMPIA RAINFALL According to an article from the Staff Meteorologist from the Olympia KOMO news team, 1.54 inches in 24hours is considered an abnormally wet day. 1.54in converts to 3.9cm , which is only .9 cm higher then what was estimated in the example we used.
  22. 22. OLYMPIA RAINFALL According to an article from the Staff Meteorologist from the Olympia KOMO news team, 1.54 inches in 24hours is considered an abnormally wet day. 1.54in converts to 3.9cm , which is only .9 cm higher then what was estimated in the example we used. This indicates that our predictions for power output are probably on the high end of things for most days in Olympia.
  23. 23. OUR MEASUREMENTS our Control Data from Predictions from our control. • Volts • (v1) 15 seconds  3 gallon bucket=25lbs 0.36 Volts 25lbs=11.33kg •  (v2) 13 seconds  25lbs/14sec 0.44 Volts  8ft height=2.43m  = 11.33kg/14sec • (v3) 13 seconds 0.48 Volts  =0.095kg/sec  0.095kg/sec(9.8m/s2 )(2.43m)=2.26watts • Amps • (a1) 0 Amps • (a2) 0 Amps • watts=(volts)(amps) • (0.36 Volts) (0Amps)=0watts • (0.44 Volts) (0Amps)=0watts
  24. 24. IMPROVEMENTS….MORE DESIGNIDEAS Smaller alternator Better gear ratio Better cup design Utilizing water catchment
  25. 25. CONCLUSIONS Micro hydro is not generally effective for energy production from individual rooftops Most components are very affordable and available as recycled or repurposed products The alternator is the only significantly expensive component A system like ours could be practical for higher volume water flows but it simply isnt cost effective for household use
  26. 26. THANK YOU TO… Clean Energy Committee for providing funding for this project The Evergreen State College Longhouse staff for allowing us to test at their facilities (even though we didn’t end up testing there)
  27. 27. BIBLIOGRAPHY http://www.mwands.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=7&products_id=482 http://www.utilityfree.com/hydro/ http://www.aurorapower.net/products/categoryid/8/list/1/level/a/productid/235.aspx http://olympia.komonews.com/content/wet-weekend-try-record-rainfall-0

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