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OUR HISTORY
Back in 1989, the concept that you could use recovered food to fight hunger was just a rebellious idea in
the ...
AMERICANS WASTE
OF THE FOOD we produce.1
40%
Each ton wasted accounts for the release of
greenhouse gases, including metha...
1 IN 7 AMERICANS
is FOOD INSECURE.
For each pound of food we waste, we are wasting
17.3 GALLONS OF WATER we used to produc...
START A
CAMPUS
KITCHEN
Across the country, student leaders are teaming up with their university
administration, community ...
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2016 Annual Report

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The Campus Kitchens Project 2016 Annual Report

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2016 Annual Report

  1. 1. OUR HISTORY Back in 1989, the concept that you could use recovered food to fight hunger was just a rebellious idea in the head of a renegade nightclub manager, Robert Egger; but he ran with that idea, and founded DC Central Kitchen, which is now widely regarded as one of the leading social enterprises in the world. In 2001, Robert and the team at DC Central Kitchen knew we needed to bring this successful idea to more communities nationwide. Instead of simply recovering wasted food and delivering it to those in need, they brought that food back to a central location and transformed it into balanced, nutritious meals. They saw that in every community there is a school, and in every school, there is a kitchen space that goes unused in the evenings and on weekends—a Campus Kitchen. That’s why at The Campus Kitchens Project, we empower students to transform their own schools into hubs for fighting food waste and bringing balanced meals to people who need them. Thanks to our innovative online tools, any interested student or school can bring this proven program to their campus. Today, The Campus Kitchens Project is the largest student movement to fight hunger and food waste in America. Each year, student volunteers recover over one million pounds of food that would have otherwise gone to waste, and turn that food into healthy, balanced meals. Those meals, made up of free food, free kitchen space, and free volunteer power, are valued at over a million dollars and are transforming communities and developing leaders for the future. That’s a sustainable solution to hunger. The nation’s leading nonprofit empowering students to create sustainable solutions to hunger and food waste. Photo from the Campus Kitchen at Troy University
  2. 2. AMERICANS WASTE OF THE FOOD we produce.1 40% Each ton wasted accounts for the release of greenhouse gases, including methane, equivalent to 2.5 TONS OF CARBON DIOXIDE.2 CO2 Building on existing assets to fight hunger today While the need in a community is often all too obvious, the existing assets that could help address those needs often go unnoticed. At each Campus Kitchen, our student leaders recover food that would have gone to waste and put university dining halls to use after hours to prepare meals for those struggling with food insecurity. In addition to creating a lean operating model, we are teaching students to see wasted resources as a sustainable solution to community issues. THE PROBLEM FOOD WASTE THE SOLUTION OUR THEORY OF CHANGE 1 1 “Wasted: How America Is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill.” Dana Gunders, Natural Resources Defense Council. NRDC Issue Paper, August 2012. 2 “Food wastage footprint: Impacts on natural resources - Summary report.” Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2013.
  3. 3. 1 IN 7 AMERICANS is FOOD INSECURE. For each pound of food we waste, we are wasting 17.3 GALLONS OF WATER we used to produce that food.4 Going beyond the meal to fight hunger tomorrow We know we can’t end hunger with food. The Campus Kitchens Project teaches students to assess the specific needs in their community, and develop programs that address the underlying root causes of food insecurity. From nutrition education classes to senior hunger outreach, from community gardens to policy events, our students deliver more than meals. Developing student leaders to end hunger in the next generation Whether they are managing volunteers in the kitchen or developing relationships with community organizations,our student volunteers are learning entrepreneurial and leadership skills that they will carry with them into future careers. Our Student Leadership Team structure ensures that students who come to volunteer have opportunities to learn and to lead. 2 3 3 “Unlocking Value Through Food Waste Reduction.” ReFED, 19 October 2016, www.refed.com/?sort=economic-value-per-ton 4 “Reducing Food Loss and Waste.” Brian Lipinski, Craig Hanson, James Lomax, Lisa Kitinoja, Richard Waite and Tim Searchinger, World Resources Institute. Working Paper, June 2013. This food waste costs us $218 BILLION EACH YEAR.3
  4. 4. START A CAMPUS KITCHEN Across the country, student leaders are teaming up with their university administration, community nonprofits, and their dining services team to build a more sustainable approach to addressing food waste on campus. Here at The Campus Kitchens Project, we’ve figured out how to create a student-run kitchen that will keep food from going to waste, and turn it into nutritious meals for those who are struggling with food insecurity. In the process, we are developing student leaders and empowering them to create programs that open pathways between college and community. It’s student-powered hunger relief. HOW DOES ITWORK? All the tools and resources you need to launch a Campus Kitchen at your school, develop partnerships, and get you off the ground are free through our website at campuskitchens.org. By creating your own online planner, you can work as a team to track your progress toward launching your Campus Kitchen along a clear roadmap. We even offer startup grants of $5,000 to help you get up and running. WHATARE THE BENEFITS? Whether you have an existing food recovery program, or are just considering getting started, joining The Campus Kitchens Project will ensure you have the resources to make it a success for the long-term. As part of this movement, you’ll have access to trainings, conferences, and leadership experiences that will help you find success after graduation regardless of your career path. We help you partner with: UNIVERSITYADMINISTRATION – by offering annual grant opportunities and AmeriCorps members to support your program and grow your impact. COMMUNITYAGENCIES – by sharing resources on Asset-Based Community Development to help you find the right partners to effectively address food insecurity in your community. DINING SERVICES – by sharing our best practices and industry- approved food safety system. STUDENTS – by offering trainings, conferences, toolkits, online volunteer management, and membership in a national movement. Photo from the Campus Kitchen at Baylor University Placeholder

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