Production Test
Jessica Hedley
Dark World.

Tough Horror.

Bates Shower.

Meltdown.

Seaming Stitchy.

Drunken Horror Ghost.
Bates Shower is my first choice of font when designing my final pieces. I
think this font is most suited to my design plan...
This font would be appropriate if I decided to go with a “stitched theme”, for instance if I
included stitches and scars a...
Summary of Fonts
Over the course of these tests I’ve looked at several themes and font styles related to “horror” and the
...
Experimenting with different
warping effects with certain
titles to see the variation of
appropriate effects that could
lo...
I’ve experimented with several variations of colour schemes to see what looks best and
also, most importantly – what is th...
Summary of Colour Scheme
The colours I have looked at are the 2 main block colours associated with IRN-BRU’s
packaging and...
Tests
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Tests

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Tests

  1. 1. Production Test Jessica Hedley
  2. 2. Dark World. Tough Horror. Bates Shower. Meltdown. Seaming Stitchy. Drunken Horror Ghost.
  3. 3. Bates Shower is my first choice of font when designing my final pieces. I think this font is most suited to my design plan as when using the “O” character it creates a swirl effect, this would work well with the spiral effect I am going to create in the eyes of my models. Also the font is quite rough and the size of lettering alters in a blood splatter effect, this is appropriate for a horror themed product. COLOUR TEST (ORANGE+WHITE) COLOUR TEST (BLUE+WHITE) COLOUR TEST (ORANGE+BLUE) COLOUR TEST (BLUE+ORANGE) Using a large scale lettering in a heavy block colour works better with poster campaigns as it can grab attention from a distance, unlike leaflets or business cards. I’m considering using a large sized font for my tagline and title and a smaller scale text with a more classic font for longer segments of text.
  4. 4. This font would be appropriate if I decided to go with a “stitched theme”, for instance if I included stitches and scars along the jaw line of my model as if their smiles have being stitched. I’m still undecided whether to do this yet as for my particular demographic I feel it wouldn’t be appropriate.
  5. 5. Summary of Fonts Over the course of these tests I’ve looked at several themes and font styles related to “horror” and the Halloween season. The majority of the themed font I found on dafont.com was sans serif and quite bold with a blood dripping effect to fit with the horror look. I’m going to work with my portrait images of my models to enlarge their smiles and put a spiral effect into their eyes, my hopes is for this to look quite creepy and weird – relating to my tagline “It will drive you crazy.” Out of all the fonts I looked at, the one I think is most suited to my theme and overall approach to the campaign – is Bates Shower. Bates Shower is quite jagged and features a variation of letter sizing when typing a word, this creates a rough effect that looks as if the text has being handwritten. What I particularly liked about this font was when using the “O” character, it became a spiral – this will work well and look good next to the spiral eyes I will use in the imagery. The font was in the “Horror” section of dafont.com and fits the theme well. I’m am still undecided whether to use an accompanying font that is of a simpler form for long parts of text such as ingredients and description. I did experiment with other fonts before coming to my final decision. Tough Horror was a good font for my particular theme of advertising but I felt would look too harsh against my images and would be hard to work with when downsizing text as the letter is capitalized and quite large.
  6. 6. Experimenting with different warping effects with certain titles to see the variation of appropriate effects that could look well on my final designs. Creating an inverted warp gives a 3D effect, which perhaps may not work as effectively on a spherical object. Decided to use the traditional IRN-BRU colour scheme but experiment with different tones of orange and blue. Including other colours into this mix would cause too much of a clash and appear harsh to the eyes when picking up.
  7. 7. I’ve experimented with several variations of colour schemes to see what looks best and also, most importantly – what is the easiest to read and understand. I’ve decided the most suitable font colour for all block backgrounds is white. White works best with readability and more so than black, which often doesn’t work so well when producing “chilled” drinks campaigns. I will use an equal ratio of white on orange and white on blue across the packaging to alternate and break up different sections. It’ll drive you crazy. It’ll drive you crazy. It’ll drive you crazy. It’ll drive you crazy. It’ll drive you crazy. It’ll drive you crazy. This is the original IRN-BRU packaging, the logo is largely stretched to fill up the side of the can. I have tried to choose a suitable capitalized font that works well with fitting in on the side of packaging and is easy enough to understand.
  8. 8. Summary of Colour Scheme The colours I have looked at are the 2 main block colours associated with IRN-BRU’s packaging and previous campaigns. I have conducted several colour tests on the overlapping of orange and blue to see which is most comfortable for the eye and easy to read. I have realized after these tests that neither order of colours works well together and have opted for using blue and orange as a background colour and white text. White text allows easier reading against heavy, impact colours – black is a suitable duplicate by sometimes isn’t as clear against darker blues, which I recently discovered through my colour tests.

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