IRN-BRU (1)
Colour Scheme:
Traditional, recognizable IRU-BRU colours – orange and blue. Generally
used so that the advert ...
IRN-BRU (2)
Colour Scheme:
There is not colour scheme here other than black and white to fit the
idea of a rough sketched ...
IRN-BRU (3)
Colour Scheme:
A blue colour scheme has been used here demonstrating a variety
of shades of blue gradually get...
IRN-BRU ORIGINAL ENERGY DRINK
IRN-BRU comes in two forms of packaging that varies depending on the amount of product you
r...
IRN-BRU (4) Web Banner

Colour Scheme:
Orange, white and indigo are the three main colours used in the IRN_BRU logo and al...
IRN-BRU 32 ENERGY DRINK
The packaging on IRU-BRU 32 is much more sleeker and modern
compared to the original product. The ...
RELENTLESS ENERGY DRINK
Gradually gradient of colour from white to an intense yellow, often in the effect
of falling smoke...
RELENTLESS ENERGY DRINK (VIDEO AD)
Relentless’ new 2013 ad campaign features British
rapper, Professor Green and Versemerg...
RED BULL ENERGY DRINK
Red, blue and silver are the colours used as part of the Red Bull logo and
packaging. All the colour...
RED BULL ENERGY DRINK (VIDEO AD)
This series of TV advertisements began in late 2000 and
the campaign named “It Gives You ...
MONSTER ENERGY DRINK
There isn’t really a distinctive colour scheme for the Monster energy other than each
individual flav...
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Irn bru ads

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Irn bru ads

  1. 1. IRN-BRU (1) Colour Scheme: Traditional, recognizable IRU-BRU colours – orange and blue. Generally used so that the advert can be related and recognized to the product instantly, similar to a trademark or a logo. Bright, unusual colour pair used to bring attention and draw the eye, which works more effectively than using contemporary colours that work in harmony such as whites and reds. A large proportion of the advert is taken up by the heavy colour orange and the font has been filled in with an indigo blue. Orange has been used to symbolize the flavor of the drink compared to CocaCola or Red Bull that do not have a distinctive flavor. Imagery: The images are strictly grayscale in every ad and are in correspondence with the tagline. They are in no relation to the product itself which is what really makes public question the advert and read on. A small picture of the IRN-BRU packaging sits central on the bottom of the add – this is used for recognition of the brand and logo. It does not give much indication to what the product is or it’s relation to the advertisement in terms of promotion. The image and text work together based on a pun or an innuendo that again, relates to questioning the advert. Font: A serif, hand-written style font has been used in this series of adds. This could be in relation to the target demographic of teenagers and young adults e.g. 14-24. A more classic, contemporary font would have been used for a more structured advertisement based on a stricter campaign such as politics or news. Context: The phrases and taglines used in these ads are based initially on sexualinnuendos associated with the promotion of the drink. It’s difficult to describe the reasoning for using this type of wording in promotional advertising other than to work on a humorous mind set. Often you can expect this advert to be controversial and inappropriate for certain demographics, despite the advert only been inappropriate based on the first understanding of the text, rather than the innuendo itself. For example “laid” relating to an egg being laid rather than first assumption of the phrase relating to sex.
  2. 2. IRN-BRU (2) Colour Scheme: There is not colour scheme here other than black and white to fit the idea of a rough sketched advertisement. There has been no shading or emboss effect added to make the advert stand out other than the rainbow banner where the tagline sits. There is no initial reasoning for this other than the decision of how the company have decided to approach the promotion. Imagery: The images here are sketched in quite a rough manor but enough so that they are recognizable and fit in with the theme which is significantly based on 1960’s advertising style. The sketches are quite childishly illustrated which initially fits in with the humorous approach than IRNBRU went for, for this set of adds. The drawings are quite inappropriate and feature a bad situation with a funny clause which is the promotion of the drink “It’s a happy time!”. For example, being attacked by bears – relating the drink to making the situation positive. Font: The font used here is serif and is a traditional default font found in Microsoft Word software. This again is representative of the simplicity of the advert and is really based on how people digest the message pursued by the ad. This ad never went to print because of it’s heavy controversial attitude to what is perceived as “happy”. The font is all in caps and an exclamation mark has been added to give an enthusiastic and also in this case a sarcastic remark on the events happening in the image. Context: The context used in this advert is significantly based on relating in a humorous approach to the target demographic, again which is more likely teenagers and young adults. It is built on sarcasm and the pun of “happy” situations been resolved by the drink. “It’s a happy time!” been aligned in a rainbow adds to the childish effect given by the ad, it relates to 60’s styling of advertising products but in a more modernist way in terms of the situations it has chosen to use as it’s marketing approach.
  3. 3. IRN-BRU (3) Colour Scheme: A blue colour scheme has been used here demonstrating a variety of shades of blue gradually getting darker to highlight the important aspects of the add. The use of orange has been significantly dropped to advertisement the “sugar free” statement on the new packaging. A white backdrop has been used to draw all attention of the product and its packaging, only on segment of orange has been used for the “sugar free” statement that keeps in the indication of what the flavour of the drink is. Imagery: As I previously stated, the approach to this advertisement is to focus all attention of the product and it’s new packaging. There is no other source of imagery but the product’s size stands against an equal ratio of text that work in balance across the page. The image has been taken by photograph and embossed/refined to stand out against the page. The logo is consistent so that, despite the lack of the statement orange – the product is still recognizable to the public with it’s signature logo. Font: The font used here is all in caps and stands strong in a strict, equal alignment that creates a square shape on the page. Certain sections of font have been enhanced and made larger than the rest to exaggerate the context and emphasize the promotion of the product. The font has been overlapped but not jumbled with the image and resembles the font used in the IRN-BRU logo, no other source of font has been used other than, that used on the product itself. There is a consistent flow that allows easy reading and not too much text that the viewer gets bored and leaves the advert. This would typically be seen as a billboard poster or on buses and bus stops, as it’s significant size works well with drawing attention. Context: Similar to all of IRN-BRU’s campaigns, they are based on humor and sarcasm that is not traditionally associated with promotion advertising. Using phrases such as “totally obvious” relates to the opinion and pun regarding the new name of the IRN-BRU product. It signifies the lack of imagination and in the naming of the product, although there is little else the product could be renamed to other than “sugar free”. It really associates again with simplicity and little effort or discretion used in promotion IRN-BRU, as it is a trademark, well recognized brand that needs little description of persuasion used to purchase the product. Overall, similar to the purpose of the drink, the impact and flare of the advertisement has been withdrawn. Whether this shows IRN-BRU’s discretion to purchase original IRN-BRU is unclear but compared to other examples of ad’s designed by IRN-BRU, this is one of the simpler ones.
  4. 4. IRN-BRU ORIGINAL ENERGY DRINK IRN-BRU comes in two forms of packaging that varies depending on the amount of product you require. Larger bottles only tend to have the packaging slip and the rest of the bottle remains clear so as not the overly stretch the logo and design. IRN-BRU’s original packaging is based on stimulation through sporting activities which is why alongside the rim of the can/bottle it includes silhouettes of sporting men doing activities. This is representative of the overall purpose of the product and an indication to its target demographic. The orange colouring is used to symbolize the flavour of the drink and there is little written context to describe the overall flavour of IRN-BRU. The blue has been chosen as a paired colour that would not usually be seen next orange so that the product stands out on a shelf next to its rival brands. The font used here is similar to that of Impact and Ariel Bold that are commonly found in persuasive forms of text or discretion of “shouting”. The bold font works well with stressing the intensity and energy of the drink, it was originally a Scottish carbonated soft drink.
  5. 5. IRN-BRU (4) Web Banner Colour Scheme: Orange, white and indigo are the three main colours used in the IRN_BRU logo and all it’s merchandise and the majority of it’s marketing. They are what makes the product well known and individual across the series of energy and sweet drinks. For it’s website and other forms of media, using the signature colours and vital to show and promote the product in a way that is representative of the brand. Orange signifies the flavor and overall taste of the drink, which is what makes it stand as a statement amongst other products, very similar to Fanta that uses an orange colour scheme to represent its taste. Blue is put into the mix to stand out, for instance used as buttons for a website or to highlight text. Blue isn’t usually paired with orange in terms of colour arrangement which is what makes IRN-BRU’s products so bold. Imagery: There are really no images used here in this web banner other than two of IRN-BRU’s main products, the original and sugar free. This is used as an obvious purpose of what the product is before initially looking further into the website. The current tagline for IRU-BRU’s marketing is “IRN-BRU gets you through.”, this has also been added alongside the imagery to show the relationship between media and the marketing campaign. Twitter, Facebook and mail icons have been added above as hyperlink buttons and over the majority of the banner is based on the index of navigating through the website. Font: The font is all in capital letters, similar to IRN-BRU’s logo and the majority of it’s marketing context. Using bold, striking font is useful with really been enthusiastic and excited about a product. It’s a very forceful design of font that jumps out on the page compared to smaller more composed, classic font that is using on less contemporary websites. The font is aligned in the mimic of buttons that would be used to navigated through the website and there isn’t very much jumbling, which allows an easy read. Context: On this particular form of media there is no real context, buttons allow navigation to features such as the products, their previous campaigns and also a gallery of previous ads that aired and ads that failed to. This has been added for people that are interested or have seen advertisements in print or on television. Often it can be used to feed peoples curiosity as previously IRN-BRU has been know for it’s controversial adverts that have a humorous affect on the majority but cause dilemmas within the media for it’s approach to promoting.
  6. 6. IRN-BRU 32 ENERGY DRINK The packaging on IRU-BRU 32 is much more sleeker and modern compared to the original product. The style of the can is now long and according to the figures “bigger” than the previous model, whether this means there is more product is unclear. The sleeker, skinnier can has many similarities to the form of Red Bull energy drink. There isn’t as much orange as is previously used in the colour scheme of the new IRN-BRU 32 packaging, whether this is to focus all initial attention on the “32”. Orange is representational of the orange flavoring that IRN-BRU is famous for. The main colour here is the blue colouring that works well with symbolizing a cool drink, or to be “served chilled”. The font used here is all in caps and aligned in different ways gradually down the can. “New Bigger Can” has been warped to fit round the can in a diagonal manor. The title of the product is on a side angle to fill up additional space and the colouring of the text has been changed to a metallic silver, this is a new additional feature of promoting the product. Embossed text allows the title to stand out, this goes the same for “32” which is significantly large and has been layered with an outer glow so that it gives a three-dimensional effect. “32” stands for the fact that the new product has 32 ingredients in it.
  7. 7. RELENTLESS ENERGY DRINK Gradually gradient of colour from white to an intense yellow, often in the effect of falling smoke. Each colour represents the flavor of the drink, e.g. yellow – lemon ice. The gradual change of colour gives a modern look with various aspects of interchanging colours with the black design. Relentless was originally created by the manufactures at Coca-Cola and thus a originally and striking logo was created for them that would be recognizable within the energy drinks industry and make Relentless it’s own individual brand. The term “relentless” is associated with not being placated or appeased or moved by entreaty. It can be further defined as a state that is unyielding in severity or strictness. The term can also be used to describe a person who never ceases or does not quit. This can be related to purpose of the product which is to give energy and strive a person to carry on, relating to the the term “energy drink” meets in correspondence with the definition of the name. The font used is a very serif type of font which allows the letters to flow into each other through the form of vine-like flicks coming out from the ends of the lettering. Typography like this is often seen in the alternative scene and uses as a form of tattoo script, it is a very striking font that relates well to the term of “never ending” that relates to Relentless.
  8. 8. RELENTLESS ENERGY DRINK (VIDEO AD) Relentless’ new 2013 ad campaign features British rapper, Professor Green and Versemerge singer, Sierra Kusterbeck. The ad was filmed in various locations around London in a documentary styling, following the artists through their day to day lives. One particular cut scene features Professor Green walking across the top of parked vehicles while the horns screech enraged. This caused questioning and controversy as to weather the add promoting crime and vandalism but graffiti been shown in the backdrop. The ad itself was called “No Half Measures” and features the song, Avalon – from Professor Green’s new album. Overall, the demographic for the add particularly targets the alternative music and rock scene which features crowd surfing, heavy music, tattoos etc. that are stereotypically associated with alternative. Quite, dark monotone colours are used and brief cut scenes are shown of people drinking Relentless to promote the brand and product. At the final cut scene of the advert it shows the tagline “No half measures” and the final Relentless logo.
  9. 9. RED BULL ENERGY DRINK Red, blue and silver are the colours used as part of the Red Bull logo and packaging. All the colours work in correspondence and harmony with each other which allows the product to flow smoothly and also stand out as a trademark again other products which makes it unique to its own branding. Red is used to fit in with the name of the drink, “Red Bull” and blue works well with the instruction to served chilled. Blue and white work as good colours to represent cold and a chilled drink. Red Bull’s slogan is “It gives you wings.”. The product was originally created for a demographic of young men that take part in extreme sports such BMX bike riding, motocross, windsurfing and many other extreme sports. This as a result is why Red Bull is the head sponsor for multiple forms of extreme sporting events worldwide. Ingredients are listed in a circular alignment around the the bottom of the can rather than in a direct list, it also gives a brief describe as to the purpose of the drink for first drinkers.
  10. 10. RED BULL ENERGY DRINK (VIDEO AD) This series of TV advertisements began in late 2000 and the campaign named “It Gives You Wings.” Red Bull released a series of cartoon based adverts relating to historic moments in time and incorporating Red Bull into those historic moments in time. The adverts are quite simple moving sketches that work in quite a rough pattern of movement. Similar to old style movie sketches found in Disney etc. The adverts caused quite a lot of controversy throughout it’s time on screen, a total of 76 comments came in due to the formation of the Titanic based advert. Saying that it was a “misrepresentation of events” and “insulting” to the cause. There is little colour used here other than watercolour like shading and texture added to bring
  11. 11. MONSTER ENERGY DRINK There isn’t really a distinctive colour scheme for the Monster energy other than each individual flavour has a different coloured “M” and title. The dark, distressed looking appeal of Monster fits the original demographic of been for young men and people that take part in extreme sports. Monster is all a big sponsor of alternative music and sport events worldwide, and is sold and promoted on site. Originally Monster energy’s logo was apparently taken from the Hebrew alphabet meaning “666” which is associated in religious and physiological terms with the devil and Satanic readings. This has not been yet confirmed to be true but still the coincidence of relating the brand name to the religious meaning of the symbol stands strong. The main focal point of the Monster can packaging is the logo, this is so it is recognizable umongst other brands on supermarket shelves. It is also apparent as to what type of drink it is which is priority when creating an energy boosting drink. Using a dark looking themed packaging works well with the term “monster” and how the brand want to be approached. The “M” has been designed in a way that looks like claws have been dragged down the packaging to reveal the colouring that represents the flavour of the drink.

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