What is Your Classroom Management Profile? <ul><li>Answer these 12 questions to learn more about your classroom management...
Scoring Your Quiz <ul><li>Add your responses to statements 1, 3, and 9. This is your score for the  authoritarian style . ...
Authoritarian Style <ul><li>The authoritarian teacher places firm limits and controls on the students . Students will ofte...
Authoritative Style <ul><li>The authoritative teacher places limits and controls on the students but simultaneously encour...
Laissez-Faire Style <ul><li>The laissez-faire teacher places few demand or controls on the students . &quot;Do your own th...
Indifferent Style <ul><li>The indifferent teacher is not very involved in the classroom . This teacher places few demands,...
Classroom Management: Strategies, Techniques,  and, oh yes, Pitfalls CAJE 32 Roland Roth Director of Education and Program...
Effective Teaching… the First Day <ul><li>Rivka Shalom is fresh out of college, clueless but excited over being a new teac...
Planning, Scripting, Ready <ul><li>Melissa began the first day of her first year of teaching with a plan. She scripted the...
Planning, Scripting, Ready, cont. <ul><li>Arriving and leaving class:   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>teach procedure for arriving...
Planning, Scripting, Ready, cont. <ul><li>Teachers things and students things:   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>some things are onl...
Overview/Objectives <ul><li>Classroom Management is requires planning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Before the First Day </li></ul...
Before the First Day <ul><li>A LIST OF THINGS TO DO </li></ul><ul><li>BEFORE SCHOOL STARTS </li></ul><ul><li>ROOM ENVIRONM...
Before the First Day, cont. <ul><li>SUPPLIES </li></ul><ul><li>Writing, drawing, and construction paper  </li></ul><ul><li...
Before the First Day, cont. <ul><li>FIND OUT ABOUT </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fire drills  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tornado d...
Before the First Day, cont. <ul><li>GETTING ORGANIZED </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Brainstorm class expectations  </li></ul></ul>...
Before the First Day, cont. <ul><li>THINK ABOUT PROCEDURES FOR... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Book distribution  </li></ul></ul>...
Classroom Setup <ul><li>It is typical for classrooms to be set up in rows, or lately, in groups of 3-4 tables (which allow...
Classroom Setup, cont. <ul><li>In groups, the opposite is true.  Students are over stimulated --by the peers that are now ...
General Rules for Promoting Effective Classroom Management <ul><li>Thirteen steps teachers can take at the beginning of th...
Important Strategies <ul><li>Once students are settled in the classroom, you'll want to continue with some of these teache...
Calming Routines <ul><li>Many teachers have found that the best way to start the school day is to  greet each student pers...
General Guidelines for Good Classroom Management Practice <ul><li>There are many different practices that are used for goo...
Classroom Management, cont. <ul><li>Maintaining good order in classrooms is one of the most difficult tasks facing young i...
Classroom Management, cont. <ul><li>Many disruptive behaviors in the classroom can be alleviated before they become seriou...
Solid Organizational Practices (SOP) <ul><li>The following set of organizational practices should help to  establish effec...
SOP: Get Off to a Good Start <ul><li>The first “honeymoon” encounter between the teacher and the students is when they for...
SOP: Learning School Policies <ul><li>Prior to meeting the class for the first time, the teacher should  become familiar w...
SOP: Establishing Rules <ul><li>Establish a set of classroom rules to guide the behavior of students at once.  Discuss the...
SOP: Overplanning Lessons <ul><li>“ Overplan” the lessons for the first week or two.  It is important for the teacher to i...
SOP: Learning Names <ul><li>Devise a seating arrangement whereby students' names are quickly learned.  Calling a student b...
SOP: Be Firm and Consistent <ul><li>A teacher can be firm yet still be supportive and friendly with students . A firm teac...
Teacher Survival Kits… <ul><li>Place all items in a brown lunch bag along with this handout:  </li></ul><ul><li>1. When it...
… Student Welcome Bags <ul><li>The  cotton ball  is to remind you that this room is full of kind words and warm feelings. ...
Ideas for  Middle School  Teachers <ul><li>In order to teach, you must have control over your classroom . This does not me...
Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>In order to have discipline there will be consequences for bad decisions.  This does...
Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>In order to be the authority figure in a classroom,  there is an imaginary line that...
Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>A teacher cannot always be fair, but should strive to  fairly apply the rules .  </l...
Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>If you discipline in anger, your judgment can be in error.  Learn to be calm in the ...
Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>It is important to act, not react. Give students choices --for example: 1. You may l...
Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>If the emotional and/or physical well being of a student is at risk, then the offend...
Back to the Beginning… <ul><li>At the end of her first year as a teacher, Melissa writes:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ My firs...
In the End <ul><li>If you do not plan, the students will plan for you.  </li></ul><ul><li>The effective teacher organizes ...
Suggested Title <ul><li>Positive Discipline: A Teacher's A-Z Guide, Revised 2nd Edition: Hundreds of Solutions for Every P...
Recommended Websites <ul><li>www.nea.org/classmanagement </li></ul><ul><li>www.teachers.net </li></ul><ul><li>www.classroo...
A Prayer for Our Teachers <ul><li>Kaddish DeRabbanan </li></ul><ul><li>(music & lyrics by Debbie Friedman) </li></ul><ul><...
<ul><li>Thank you for coming to this session on Classroom Management </li></ul><ul><li>To get a copy of this slide show (a...
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Classroom Management: Tools and Pitfalls from Real Hebrew School Classroom Experiences

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Roland Roth

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Classroom Management: Tools and Pitfalls from Real Hebrew School Classroom Experiences

  1. 1. What is Your Classroom Management Profile? <ul><li>Answer these 12 questions to learn more about your classroom management profile. The steps are simple: Read each statement carefully. Write your response, from the scale below, on a sheet of paper. Respond to each statement based upon either actual or imagined classroom experience. Then, follow the scoring instructions below. It couldn't be easier! </li></ul><ul><li>= Strongly Disagree </li></ul><ul><li>= Disagree </li></ul><ul><li>= Neutral </li></ul><ul><li>= Agree </li></ul><ul><li>= Strongly Agree </li></ul><ul><li>(1) If a student is disruptive during class, I assign him/her to detention, without further discussion. </li></ul><ul><li>(2) I don't want to impose any rules on my students. </li></ul><ul><li>(3) The classroom must be quiet in order for students to learn. </li></ul><ul><li>(4) I am concerned about both what my students learn and how they learn. </li></ul><ul><li>(5) If a student turns in a late homework assignment, it is not my problem. </li></ul><ul><li>(6) I don't want to reprimand a student because it might hurt his/her feelings. </li></ul><ul><li>(7) Class preparation isn't worth the effort. </li></ul><ul><li>(8) I always try to explain the reasons behind my rules and decisions. </li></ul><ul><li>(9) I will not accept excuses from a student who is tardy. </li></ul><ul><li>(10) The emotional well-being of my students is more important than classroom control. </li></ul><ul><li>(11) My students understand that they can interrupt my lecture if they have a relevant question. </li></ul><ul><li>(12) If a student requests a hall pass, I always honor the request. </li></ul>
  2. 2. Scoring Your Quiz <ul><li>Add your responses to statements 1, 3, and 9. This is your score for the authoritarian style . </li></ul><ul><li>Statements 4, 8 and 11 refer to the authoritative style . </li></ul><ul><li>Statements 6, 10, and 12 refer to the laissez-faire style . </li></ul><ul><li>Statements 2, 5, and 7 refer to the indifferent style . </li></ul><ul><li>The result is your classroom management profile. Your score for each management style can range from 3 to 15. A high score indicates a strong preference for that particular style. After you have scored your quiz, and determined your profile, read the descriptions of each management style. You may see a little bit of yourself in each one. </li></ul><ul><li>As you gain teaching experience, you may find that your preferred style(s) will change. Over time, your profile may become more diverse or more focused. Also, it may be suitable to rely upon a specific style when addressing a particular situation or subject. Perhaps the successful teacher is one who can evaluate a situation and then apply the appropriate style. Finally, remember that the intent of this exercise is to inform you and arouse your curiosity regarding classroom management styles. </li></ul><ul><li>The classroom management styles are adaptations of the parenting styles discussed in Adolescence , by John T. Santrock. They were adapted by Kris Bosworth, Kevin McCracken, Paul Haakenson, Marsha Ritter Jones, Anne Grey, Laura Versaci, Julie James, and Ronen Hammer. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Authoritarian Style <ul><li>The authoritarian teacher places firm limits and controls on the students . Students will often have assigned seats for the entire term. The desks are usually in straight rows and there are no deviations. Students must be in their seats at the beginning of class and they frequently remain there throughout the period. This teacher rarely gives hall passes or recognizes excused absences. Often, it is quiet. Students know they should not interrupt the teacher. Since verbal exchange and discussion are discouraged, the authoritarian's students do not have the opportunity to learn and/or practice communication skills. </li></ul><ul><li>This teacher prefers vigorous discipline and expects swift obedience. Failure to obey the teacher usually results in detention or a trip to the principal's office. In this classroom, students need to follow directions and not ask why. </li></ul><ul><li>At the extreme, the authoritarian teacher gives no indication that heshe cares for the students. Mr. Doe is a good example of an authoritarian teacher. His students receive praise and encouragement infrequently, if at all. Also, he makes no effort to organize activities such as field trips. He feels that these special events only distract the students from learning. After all, Mr. Doe believes that students need only listen to his lecture to gain the necessary knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Students in this class are likely to be reluctant to initiate activity, since they may feel powerless. Mr. Doe tells the students what to do and when to do it. He makes all classroom decisions. Therefore, his style does little to increase achievement motivation or encourage the setting of personal goals. </li></ul><ul><li>One Middle-school pupil reacts to this teaching style: “I don't really care for this teacher. He is really strict and doesn't seem to want to give his students a fair chance. He seems unfair, although that's just his way of getting his point across.” </li></ul>
  4. 4. Authoritative Style <ul><li>The authoritative teacher places limits and controls on the students but simultaneously encourages independence . This teacher often explains the reasons behind the rules and decisions. If a student is disruptive, the teacher offers a polite, but firm, reprimand. This teacher sometimes metes out discipline, but only after careful consideration of the circumstances. </li></ul><ul><li>The authoritative teacher is also open to considerable verbal interaction, including critical debates. The students know that they can interrupt the teacher if they have a relevant question or comment. This environment offers the students the opportunity to learn and practice communication skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Ms. Smith exemplifies the authoritative teaching style. She exhibits a warm and nurturing attitude toward the students and expresses genuine interest and affection. Her classroom abounds with praise and encouragement. She often writes comments on homework and offers positive remarks to students. This authoritative teacher encourages self-reliant and socially competent behavior and fosters higher achievement motivation. Often, she will guide the students through a project, rather than lead them. </li></ul><ul><li>A student reacts to this style: “I like this teacher. She is fair and understands that students can't be perfect. She is the kind of teacher you can talk to without being put down or feeling embarrassed.” </li></ul>
  5. 5. Laissez-Faire Style <ul><li>The laissez-faire teacher places few demand or controls on the students . &quot;Do your own thing&quot; describes this classroom. This teacher accepts the student's impulses and actions and is less likely to monitor their behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Mr. Jones uses a laissez-faire style. He strives to not hurt the student's feelings and has difficulty saying no to a student or enforcing rules. If a student disrupts the class, Mr. Jones may assume that he is not giving that student enough attention. When a student interrupts a lecture, Mr. Jones accepts the interruption with the belief that the student must surely have something valuable to add. When he does offer discipline, it is likely to be inconsistent. </li></ul><ul><li>Mr. Jones is very involved with his students and cares for them very much. He is more concerned with the students' emotional well-being than he is with classroom control. He sometimes bases classroom decisions on his students feelings rather than on their academic concerns. </li></ul><ul><li>Mr. Jones wants to be the students' friend. He may even encourage contact outside the classroom. He has a difficult time establishing boundaries between his professional life and his personal life. </li></ul><ul><li>However, this overindulgent style is associated with students lack of social competence and self-control. It is difficult for students to learn socially acceptable behavior when the teacher is so permissive. With few demands placed upon them, these students frequently have lower motivation to achieve. </li></ul><ul><li>Regardless, students often like this teacher. A Middle School student says: </li></ul><ul><li>This is a pretty popular teacher. You don't have to be serious throughout the class. But sometimes things get out of control and we learn nothing at all. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Indifferent Style <ul><li>The indifferent teacher is not very involved in the classroom . This teacher places few demands, if any, on the students and appears generally uninterested. The indifferent teacher just doesn't want to impose on the students. As such, he/she often feels that class preparation is not worth the effort. Things like field trips and special projects are out of the question. This teacher simply won't take the necessary preparation time. Sometimes, he/she will use the same materials, year after year. </li></ul><ul><li>Also, classroom discipline is lacking. This teacher may lack the skills, confidence, or courage to discipline students. </li></ul><ul><li>The students sense and reflect the teacher's indifferent attitude. Accordingly, very little learning occurs. Everyone is just &quot;going through the motions&quot; and killing time. In this aloof environment, the students have very few opportunities to observe or practice communication skills. With few demands placed on them and very little discipline, students have low achievement motivation and lack self-control. </li></ul><ul><li>According to one student, “This teacher can't control the class and we never learn anything in there. There is hardly ever homework and people rarely bring their books.” </li></ul><ul><li>Mrs. Johnson is a good example of an indifferent teacher. She uses the same lesson plans every year, never bothering to update them. For her, each day is the same. She lectures for the first twenty minutes of class. Sometimes she will show a film or a slideshow. When she does, it becomes a substitute for her lecture, not a supplement. If there is any time left (and there always is) she allows students to study quietly and to talk softly. As long as they don't bother her, she doesn't mind what they do. As far as she is concerned, the students are responsible for their own education. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Classroom Management: Strategies, Techniques, and, oh yes, Pitfalls CAJE 32 Roland Roth Director of Education and Programming Congregation Beth Shalom, Wilmington, DE [email_address]
  8. 8. Effective Teaching… the First Day <ul><li>Rivka Shalom is fresh out of college, clueless but excited over being a new teacher. With 17 boxes of activities she can't wait to make learning fun. So she starts the first day of school with her most favorite fun activity and then spends the rest of the school year chasing after the class. </li></ul><ul><li>Melissa Bat-Sheva scripted her first day of school. She is like a coach who scripts the first 25 plays of a game. A teacher would not &quot;wing it&quot; in a classroom any more than a coach would &quot;wing it&quot; on a football field or a pilot would wing it on a flight from Baltimore to Kansas City! The successful and effective teacher goes in with a plan and modifies that plan if conditions change. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Planning, Scripting, Ready <ul><li>Melissa began the first day of her first year of teaching with a plan. She scripted the first day of school as follows: </li></ul><ul><li>Greet each student at the door: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>hand each child a classroom rules sheet (goes in notebook) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>direct them toward their assigned seat (alphabetical) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>tell child to read and follow the instructions written on the board </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>have instructions written on board for them to start on </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>finish greeting the last to arrive in class </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Welcome students to class and introduce myself: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>my name </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>talk about family (husband, kids) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>where I'm from and where I live </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>tell them why I wanted to teach </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Planning, Scripting, Ready, cont. <ul><li>Arriving and leaving class: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>teach procedure for arriving in class </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>teach procedure for dismissal from class </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Explain rules and daily procedures: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>refer to the rules that are posted at front </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>explain discipline plan and refer to poster </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>go over procedures and refer to poster </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>talk about &quot;We missed you&quot; chart </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Respecting the classroom and the art supplies: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>refer to classroom rules and procedures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>teach them to be responsible for the art supplies and room; teach procedures </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Planning, Scripting, Ready, cont. <ul><li>Teachers things and students things: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>some things are only for me </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>other things are for you to use as you need it </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Explain thematic lessons and such: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>will be going along with what regular teacher is teaching </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Art centers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>everyone will get a chance to go to all the centers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>art centers board will have names (numbers) that tell us who does what that day </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Notebooks: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>this is so that the child can record their grades and keep track of them for themselves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>to store vocabulary words (Hebrew, etc.) for future use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>to write a weekly journal entry about what they liked most about the week’s lesson </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Overview/Objectives <ul><li>Classroom Management is requires planning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Before the First Day </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Classroom Setup </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>General Rules for Promoting Effective Classroom Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>General Guidelines for Good Classroom Management Practice </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Before the First Day <ul><li>A LIST OF THINGS TO DO </li></ul><ul><li>BEFORE SCHOOL STARTS </li></ul><ul><li>ROOM ENVIRONMENT </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decide on a theme for your classroom </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prepare/purchase bulletin board materials </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decide where to post notices/materials </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make a classroom welcome sign </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Set up learning centers, display tables, and student work areas </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Before the First Day, cont. <ul><li>SUPPLIES </li></ul><ul><li>Writing, drawing, and construction paper </li></ul><ul><li>Pencils/Pens </li></ul><ul><li>Crayons </li></ul><ul><li>Paste/glue </li></ul><ul><li>Stapler/staples </li></ul><ul><li>Paper clips </li></ul><ul><li>Rubber bands </li></ul><ul><li>Straight and safety pins </li></ul><ul><li>Transparent tape </li></ul><ul><li>Manila folders </li></ul><ul><li>Marking pens </li></ul><ul><li>Rulers </li></ul><ul><li>Art supplies </li></ul><ul><li>Grade book </li></ul><ul><li>Lesson plan book </li></ul><ul><li>Attendance materials </li></ul><ul><li>Textbooks/workbooks </li></ul><ul><li>Boxes for keeping units </li></ul>
  15. 15. Before the First Day, cont. <ul><li>FIND OUT ABOUT </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fire drills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tornado drills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lunch procedure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Staff handbook </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dismissal procedure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Your colleagues </li></ul></ul><ul><li>STUDENT PREP </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make student name tags </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prepare first-day materials to send home (emergency cards, school/classroom rules, bus regulations/info, letter to parents, classroom schedule) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prepare class list </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decide on your seating procedure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Check records for students with special needs </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Before the First Day, cont. <ul><li>GETTING ORGANIZED </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Brainstorm class expectations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Arrange desks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pin up bulletin boards, notices, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write lesson plans for the first week </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Duplicate materials for first week </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write daily schedule, date, and your name on the board </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prepare files for parent correspondence, school bulletins, and sub teachers </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Before the First Day, cont. <ul><li>THINK ABOUT PROCEDURES FOR... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Book distribution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Turning in work, format of work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Handing back assignments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Homework </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Grading--recording grades, extra credit, portfolios </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Housekeeping procedures--clean up, supply storage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rewards and incentives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communicating with parents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Signals for students' attention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Daily routines--beginning of day, transition times, independent and group work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Agenda use and motivators </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Classroom Setup <ul><li>It is typical for classrooms to be set up in rows, or lately, in groups of 3-4 tables (which allow for easier cooperative learning). However, there are fundamental problems for each: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In rows, studies have shown that the further back you go, the more discipline problems there are. The visual, aural and physical stimulation from the teacher is increasingly diminished as you move further back. This allows boredom to set in, and as a result, potential disruption. </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Classroom Setup, cont. <ul><li>In groups, the opposite is true. Students are over stimulated --by the peers that are now not only next to him/her, but across the table! There is now MORE to distract the student, leaving it harder for the teacher to keep the student focused on any frontal instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>An alternative is to arrange the chairs/tables into a three-sided &quot;box&quot; shape, (with an occasional second row if room demands). In this fashion, EVERY STUDENT IS IN THE FIRST ROW! The teacher can freely move around the room while talking, and therefore giving &quot;personal&quot; contact with each student. The result: greater attention and fewer discipline problems. Desks/tables can be moved into cooperative learning groups as needed usually within two-three minutes! </li></ul>
  20. 20. General Rules for Promoting Effective Classroom Management <ul><li>Thirteen steps teachers can take at the beginning of the year to promote effective classroom management are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop a set of written expectations you can live with and enforce. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be consistent . Be consistent. Be consistent. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be patient with yourself and with your students. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make parents your allies . Call early and often. Use the word &quot;concerned.&quot; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When communicating a concern, be specific and descriptive . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don't talk too much . Use the first 15 minutes of class for lectures or presentations, then get the kids working. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Break the class period into two or three different activities . Be sure each activity segues smoothly into the next. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Begin at the very beginning of each class period and end at the very end . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don't roll call . Take the roll with your seating chart while students are working. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep all students actively involved . For example, while a student does a presentation, involve the other students in evaluating it. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discipline individual students quietly and privately . Never engage in a disciplinary conversation across the room. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep your sense of perspective and your sense of humor . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Know when to ask for help . </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Important Strategies <ul><li>Once students are settled in the classroom, you'll want to continue with some of these teacher-recommended techniques for maintaining control without confrontation: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Establish eye contact. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Move around the room and increase proximity to restless students. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Send a silent signal. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Give a quiet reminder. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Re-direct a student's attention. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Begin a new activity. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Offer a choice. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use humor. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide positive reinforcement. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wait quietly until everyone is on task. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask a directed question. </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Calming Routines <ul><li>Many teachers have found that the best way to start the school day is to greet each student personally as he or she enters the classroom. They use the opportunity to establish rapport, and to deal with such minor problems as gum chewing, boisterous behavior, bad moods, or unwanted materials, quietly and discretely -- before they can erupt into public confrontations that threaten control and disrupt the class. A warm personal welcome sets the tone for the day . Offer students a choice of three greetings -- a handshake, a high five, or a hug. Their response can tell a lot about how each student is feeling that day. </li></ul>
  23. 23. General Guidelines for Good Classroom Management Practice <ul><li>There are many different practices that are used for good classroom management. </li></ul><ul><li>As with all classroom management practices, adapt what you like to your classroom taking account the age and personality of the class as a group, and of you as an educator. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Classroom Management, cont. <ul><li>Maintaining good order in classrooms is one of the most difficult tasks facing young inexperienced teachers. The task has become more difficult over the past few decades as young people's attitudes to people in authority have changed dramatically . Some of the changes have led to greater self-confidence in students. Others--such as the acceptance of violence to achieve ends, attitudes to substance abuse and an increasing lack of respect for authority--have made classroom management and life in school generally more difficult, and more demanding , on those who are charged with maintaining a positive learning environment. </li></ul>
  25. 25. Classroom Management, cont. <ul><li>Many disruptive behaviors in the classroom can be alleviated before they become serious discipline problems. Such behaviors can be reduced by the teacher's ability to employ effective organizational practices . Such practices are at the heart of the teaching process and are essential to establishing and maintaining classroom control. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Solid Organizational Practices (SOP) <ul><li>The following set of organizational practices should help to establish effective control of the classroom by the teacher: </li></ul>
  27. 27. SOP: Get Off to a Good Start <ul><li>The first “honeymoon” encounter between the teacher and the students is when they formulate their impressions of the teacher. Students sit quietly, raise their hands to respond and are generally well behaved. The teacher is easily misled into thinking that this is an ideal class and may relax their vigilance. Students within a week will begin to test the waters to see what they can &quot;get away with&quot;. It is during this period that the effective teacher will establish the expected ground-rules for classroom behavior. </li></ul>
  28. 28. SOP: Learning School Policies <ul><li>Prior to meeting the class for the first time, the teacher should become familiar with school policies concerning acceptable student behavior and disciplinary procedures. The teacher should definitely know what the school expects from both student and teacher in regard to discipline. </li></ul>
  29. 29. SOP: Establishing Rules <ul><li>Establish a set of classroom rules to guide the behavior of students at once. Discuss the rationale of these rules with the students to ensure they understand and see the need for each rule. Keep the list of rules short. The rules most often involve paying attention, respect for others, excessive noise, securing materials and completion of homework assignments. </li></ul>
  30. 30. SOP: Overplanning Lessons <ul><li>“ Overplan” the lessons for the first week or two. It is important for the teacher to impress on the students from the outset that he or she is organized and confident of their ability to get through the syllabus. </li></ul>
  31. 31. SOP: Learning Names <ul><li>Devise a seating arrangement whereby students' names are quickly learned. Calling a student by his or her name early in the year gives the student an increased sense of well being. It also gives a teacher greater control of situations. “Shmueli, stop talking and finish your work” is more effective than “Let us stop talking and finish our work”. </li></ul>
  32. 32. SOP: Be Firm and Consistent <ul><li>A teacher can be firm yet still be supportive and friendly with students . A firm teacher can provide an environment where the students feel safe and secure. Many teachers report that it is easier to begin the year in a firm manner and relax later, than to begin in a lax manner and then try to become firm. </li></ul>
  33. 33. Teacher Survival Kits… <ul><li>Place all items in a brown lunch bag along with this handout: </li></ul><ul><li>1. When it spills, wipe it ( paper towel ) </li></ul><ul><li>2. When it cries or sneezes, dry it ( tissue ) </li></ul><ul><li>3. When it bleeds bandage it ( Band-Aid ) </li></ul><ul><li>4. When it needs a hug and a kiss, give it ( candy kiss ) </li></ul><ul><li>5. When it rips, pin it ( safety pin ) </li></ul><ul><li>6. When it's sour, sweeten it ( pack of sugar ) </li></ul><ul><li>7. When it's wrong, erase it ( eraser ) </li></ul><ul><li>8. When it pounds, soothe it ( aspirin ) </li></ul><ul><li>9. When it hurts, grin and &quot;bear&quot; it ( bear sticker ) </li></ul><ul><li>10. When it's important, write it down ( note pad sheet ) </li></ul><ul><li>11. When it's a good day, chalk it up ( piece of chalk ) </li></ul><ul><li>12. When it's a bad day, ask G-d for strength and hope for a better day tomorrow ( nothing is found in the survival kit for this need - it comes only from the heart and soul of the teacher ). </li></ul><ul><li>13. When it's gossip, cut it out and dispose of it ( word gossip on a sheet of paper with cutting dashes around it ) </li></ul>
  34. 34. … Student Welcome Bags <ul><li>The cotton ball is to remind you that this room is full of kind words and warm feelings. </li></ul><ul><li>The chocolate kiss is to comfort you when you are feeling sad. </li></ul><ul><li>The tissue is to remind you to help dry someone's tears. </li></ul><ul><li>The sticker is to remind you that we all stick together and help each other. </li></ul><ul><li>The star is to remind you to shine and always try your best. </li></ul><ul><li>The gold thread is to remind you that friendship ties our hearts together. </li></ul><ul><li>The rubber band is to remind you to hug someone. </li></ul><ul><li>The penny is to remind you that you are valuable and special. </li></ul><ul><li>The toothpick is to remind you to &quot;pick out&quot; the good qualities in your classmates. </li></ul><ul><li>The bandage is to heal hurt feelings in your friends and in yourself. </li></ul><ul><li>The eraser is to remind you that we all make mistakes, and that is O.K. </li></ul><ul><li>The life saver is to remind you that you can come to me if you need someone to talk to. </li></ul>
  35. 35. Ideas for Middle School Teachers <ul><li>In order to teach, you must have control over your classroom . This does not mean you should act like a dictator. If you try to teach without establishing control, then the quality of teaching will suffer. </li></ul><ul><li>In order to have true respect, you must give it . This does not mean that you accept undesirable comments in the classroom nor does it mean that you can run a classroom without some consequences. </li></ul>
  36. 36. Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>In order to have discipline there will be consequences for bad decisions. This does not mean that consequences must be harsh to accomplish its job. Harsh consequences do not accomplish much except for breeding hatred. Consequences should fit the offense. Often the natural consequence is the best. </li></ul>
  37. 37. Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>In order to be the authority figure in a classroom, there is an imaginary line that you shouldn't cross . Does that mean you cannot be a friend to your students? No, it means that if the friendship gets in the way of education, then it has crossed the imaginary line. (For instance, others may see such conduct as playing favorites and it could undermine your relationships with them.) </li></ul>
  38. 38. Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>A teacher cannot always be fair, but should strive to fairly apply the rules . </li></ul><ul><li>A positive classroom will accomplish much more than a classroom that is filled with negativism--don't threaten your students. </li></ul>
  39. 39. Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>If you discipline in anger, your judgment can be in error. Learn to be calm in the face of problems. It will be a healthier approach for you, and your students will learn from your problem solving abilities. Don't take your students' remarks personally--students at this age may hate a teacher one day and love him/her then next. It is a sign of their age, not their overall opinion of the teacher. </li></ul>
  40. 40. Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>It is important to act, not react. Give students choices --for example: 1. You may leave the room and go to . . . . .(a pre-selected place--maybe another teacher can provide a time out corner if you don't have a time out room). 2. You may stay here and make changes in your personal choices. 3. You may stay in the room, but change your seat to an area where you agree there will be fewer problems.---When you give students choices, they have power--power to make a good choice and continue receiving instruction. </li></ul>
  41. 41. Middle School Teachers, cont. <ul><li>If the emotional and/or physical well being of a student is at risk, then the offender should be removed from the room--no choices. </li></ul><ul><li>If teachers copy the discipline style of another, it may not fit them or their classroom. Classroom control, like teaching, requires personalization--what works best for your is what you should do. </li></ul><ul><li>The above list is generalities that work. Think about using them.... Whatever you choose, keep a positive atmosphere in the classroom. </li></ul>
  42. 42. Back to the Beginning… <ul><li>At the end of her first year as a teacher, Melissa writes: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ My first day of school was a success. Each of my students had a place to sit and an art number, which they would use for the duration of the year. The overhead projector was ready with seatwork on the board and they worked quietly until I was ready to introduce myself. I let them know what I expected and that each of them would be successful. Classroom management and having a procedure for everything is a key factor in success, but I have also found that having a place for everything and everything in it's place is also very important. The longer it takes to find a paper or get out work for students who have been absent, the more distracted other students become.” </li></ul></ul>
  43. 43. In the End <ul><li>If you do not plan, the students will plan for you. </li></ul><ul><li>The effective teacher organizes and structures the classroom for his/her success, but most importantly, for the success of the students. </li></ul>
  44. 44. Suggested Title <ul><li>Positive Discipline: A Teacher's A-Z Guide, Revised 2nd Edition: Hundreds of Solutions for Every Possible Classroom Behavior Problem (Paperback) by Jane Nelsen (Prima Publishing) www.positivediscipline.com </li></ul>
  45. 45. Recommended Websites <ul><li>www.nea.org/classmanagement </li></ul><ul><li>www.teachers.net </li></ul><ul><li>www.classroommanagement.com </li></ul><ul><li>http://education.indiana.edu/cas/ </li></ul><ul><li>theteachersguide.com/classmanagment </li></ul><ul><li>www.teachervision.com </li></ul>
  46. 46. A Prayer for Our Teachers <ul><li>Kaddish DeRabbanan </li></ul><ul><li>(music & lyrics by Debbie Friedman) </li></ul><ul><li>For our Teachers and their Students </li></ul><ul><li>And the Students of the Students </li></ul><ul><li>We ask for Peace and Loving-Kindness </li></ul><ul><li>And let us say Amen. </li></ul><ul><li>And for those who study Torah </li></ul><ul><li>Here and Everywhere </li></ul><ul><li>May they be blessed, with all they need </li></ul><ul><li>And let us say Amen. </li></ul><ul><li>We ask for Peace, and Loving-Kindness, </li></ul><ul><li>And Let us say Amen. </li></ul><ul><li>We ask for Peace, and Loving-Kindness, </li></ul><ul><li>And Let us say Amen. </li></ul>
  47. 47. <ul><li>Thank you for coming to this session on Classroom Management </li></ul><ul><li>To get a copy of this slide show (and outline) email: </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] or call Roland Roth at 302-654-0154. </li></ul><ul><li>Safe Travels and see you in Vermont! </li></ul>

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