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PLAGIARISM AND CITATION BASICS <br />A QUICK GUIDE ON WHY AND HOW TO PROPERLY RESEARCH…without getting in trouble! <br />...
WHY RESEARCH? <br />We research because we want to explore interesting topics by…<br />Incorporating others’ ideas and inf...
What’s the deal with…PLAGIARISM? <br />To plagiarize means “to commit literary theft.”<br /><ul><li>“To present as new and...
WHAT IS PLAGIARISM? <br />Anytime you use a direct quote, or even change an author’s words, you are using somebody else’s ...
WHAT IS PLAGIARISM…cont. <br />Certain well-known facts do not need to be cited.<br />If your reader would probably alread...
CITATIONS<br />As you know, in order to prevent plagiarism, we must cite our sources.<br />There is a specific method of c...
CITATION SALAD! (Book source)<br />STEP 3:  CROUTONS=CITY AND STATE OF PUBLICATION <br />City: Publisher. <br />STEP 4:  V...
VOILA! Book Salad.  <br />Now you try…<br />Last name, First name. Book Title. City: 	Publisher, Year. Print. <br />
CITATION SALAD! (Web source)<br />STEP 3:  CROUTONS=PUBLISHER NAME AND DATE<br /> Name, date.<br />STEP 4:  DRESSING=MEDIU...
VOILA! Web Salad. <br />Now you try…<br />Last name, First name (author or editor). “Title 	of article.” Name of site. Pub...
TIME FOR YOU TO “CITE YOURSELF”!<br />In your groups, you will be taking on the role as an “ingredient” in a citation.<br ...
BEWARE OF CERTAIN SITES!<br />You should know by now that WIKIPEDIA and .com sites are unreliable sources.<br />Watch…<br ...
IN-TEXT CITATIONS<br />In-text citations need to be used ANYTIME you state a fact or idea that is not our own (even if it’...
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Plagiarism and Citation Basics

This is an easy lesson to use to teach middle school/high school students the basics of MLA format for research. It will show them how to properly cite book and web sources. Plagiarism is also addressed.

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Plagiarism and Citation Basics

  1. 1. PLAGIARISM AND CITATION BASICS <br />A QUICK GUIDE ON WHY AND HOW TO PROPERLY RESEARCH…without getting in trouble! <br /><br />
  2. 2. WHY RESEARCH? <br />We research because we want to explore interesting topics by…<br />Incorporating others’ ideas and information <br />Exploring our own thoughts and opinions in relation to other people’s <br />Believe it or not, you were not born an expert on your topic! Therefore, you must research and cite your sources. <br />
  3. 3. What’s the deal with…PLAGIARISM? <br />To plagiarize means “to commit literary theft.”<br /><ul><li>“To present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source.” </li></ul>You must give credit to the “owner” of the information that you use in your paper, otherwise you are STEALING! <br />
  4. 4. WHAT IS PLAGIARISM? <br />Anytime you use a direct quote, or even change an author’s words, you are using somebody else’s thoughts. <br />Simply changing the wording (paraphrasing) is not enough; you must cite your sources.<br />When in doubt, CITE! It’s better to be safe than sorry. <br />
  5. 5. WHAT IS PLAGIARISM…cont. <br />Certain well-known facts do not need to be cited.<br />If your reader would probably already know the information, you do not have to cite. <br />Ex: Walt Disney founded the Disney company and created one of the most well-known cartoon characters of all time, Mickey Mouse. (NOT PLAGIARISM)<br />Ex: Raised on a farm near Marceline, Missouri, Walt became interested in drawing at an early age, selling his first sketches to neighbors when he was only seven years old. (PLAGIARISM—IF NOT CITED) <br />
  6. 6. CITATIONS<br />As you know, in order to prevent plagiarism, we must cite our sources.<br />There is a specific method of citing sources, and certain “ingredients” are needed, in a specific order, for the citation to be correct and in MLA format. <br />
  7. 7. CITATION SALAD! (Book source)<br />STEP 3: CROUTONS=CITY AND STATE OF PUBLICATION <br />City: Publisher. <br />STEP 4: VEGGIES=YEAR OF PUBLICATION<br />Year.<br />STEP 5: DRESSING= MEDIUM (TYPE OF SOURCE)<br />Print. <br />STEP 2: LETTUCE= TITLE<br />Italics. <br />STEP 1: SALAD BOWL= AUTHOR’S NAME<br />Last, First. <br />
  8. 8. VOILA! Book Salad. <br />Now you try…<br />Last name, First name. Book Title. City: Publisher, Year. Print. <br />
  9. 9. CITATION SALAD! (Web source)<br />STEP 3: CROUTONS=PUBLISHER NAME AND DATE<br /> Name, date.<br />STEP 4: DRESSING=MEDIUM (TYPE OF SOURCE)<br />Web.<br />STEP 5: VEGGIES= DATE OF ACCESS<br />Day Mo. Year. <br />STEP 2: LETTUCE= TITLE OF ARTICLE AND SITE<br />“Title of Article.” Title of Site.<br />STEP 1: SALAD BOWL= AUTHOR/EDITOR’S NAME<br />Last, First. <br />
  10. 10. VOILA! Web Salad. <br />Now you try…<br />Last name, First name (author or editor). “Title of article.” Name of site. Publisher name or organization, date of publication. Web. Day Mo. Year (accessed). <br />Did everyone get it right? Check your partner’s work. <br />
  11. 11. TIME FOR YOU TO “CITE YOURSELF”!<br />In your groups, you will be taking on the role as an “ingredient” in a citation.<br />As a group, you will have to figure out how to arrange all of your members in the order of the citation, including all necessary punctuation! <br />Good luck! <br />
  12. 12. BEWARE OF CERTAIN SITES!<br />You should know by now that WIKIPEDIA and .com sites are unreliable sources.<br />Watch…<br />See what I mean? <br />Stick to .edu, .org, or .govsites, which come from reliable educational institutions, organizations, or the government. <br />
  13. 13. IN-TEXT CITATIONS<br />In-text citations need to be used ANYTIME you state a fact or idea that is not our own (even if it’s in your own words).<br />It should always include the first item in the citation.<br />Typically, this will be the author’s name…<br />If no name, then the title of the work. <br />If from a book or article, it should also include the page number. <br />In-text citations always go inside parentheses ( ). <br />In-text citations come at the end of the sentence, BEFORE the period. <br />

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