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Color theory

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Color theory

  1. 1. Agenda •  Warm Up: In your sketchbook please write down what colors you think you will use for each room in your apartment •  Agenda: –  Turn in final floor plans with rubric and reflection questions –  Color Theory –  Worktime: Concept Boards •  8 by 8 show workshop meeting next Thursday in Room 7
  2. 2. Unit 3: Professional Practices and Client Communication Please grab a few boxes of colored pencils for your table
  3. 3. Elements of Art Basic building blocks of art. Can’t make a work of art without at least one•  Color•  Line•  Shape•  Texture•  Form•  Space•  Value
  4. 4. Principles of Design The rules that govern how an artist organizes the elements of art in a work of art•  Balance•  Contrast•  Emphasis•  Variety•  Unity•  Proportion•  Movement
  5. 5. OPAQUE VS. TRANSPARENT/ TRANSLUCENT UNABLE TO SEE ABLE TO BE SEEN THROUGH THROUGH (EITHER PARTIALLY OR FULLY)
  6. 6. WHICH IS OPAQUE?
  7. 7. ARE THESE TRANSPARENT OR OPAQUE?
  8. 8. WHAT PART OF THIS STILL LIFE DRAWING IS TRANSPARENT?
  9. 9. HUE A pure (unmixed with black, white, gray or another color) color’s name or how it is classifiedBlue’s hue is blueRed’s hue is redGreen’s hue is green
  10. 10. CHROMA How pure a color is, meaning the amount of black, white or gray that is present in a colorHigh Chroma Colors – very intense and vivid,very little black, white or gray presentLow Chroma Colors – very dull and colors, alot of black, white or gray present
  11. 11. INTENSITY Brightness or dullness of a color (NOT lightness or darkness!)A pure hue has a high intensityWhen a hue is mixed with white, black, gray oranother color it has a lower intensity
  12. 12. INTENSITY
  13. 13. SATURATION The intensity of a specific hue. It is based on the color’s purityA highly saturated hue has a vivid, intense colorA less saturated color appears more muted andgray.
  14. 14. SATURATION
  15. 15. VALUE The brightness or darkness of a color
  16. 16. VALUE
  17. 17. COLOR SYSTEMS ADDITIVE SUBTRACTIVE
  18. 18. ADDITIVE COLOR SYSTEM•  Named for the more colors mixed together the brighter they become, adding to the brightness of the color •  Color + Color = Brighter color •  End result = White •  Primary Colors: Red, Green and Blue •  Medium: Light •  Uses: Color computer monitors, color TV’s, stage lighting, contemporary luminal art
  19. 19. SUBTRACTIVE COLOR SYSTEM•  Named for the more colors mixed together the darker they become. subtracting away the brightness of the color •  Color + Color = Black •  End result = Black •  Primary Colors – magenta, cyan, yellow •  Media: transparent materials such as Watercolors, Dyes and Acetates •  Uses: Artists, Color Photography, Full Color Printing Industry applications such as billboards, magazines, illustrations, books and advertising, computer printers
  20. 20. 12 COLOR SYSTEM COLOR WHEEL
  21. 21. PRIMARYCANNOT BE MADE BY MIXING OTHER COLORS TOGETHER
  22. 22. PRIMARY
  23. 23. SECONDARYMADE BY MIXING 2 PRIMARY COLORS TOGETHER
  24. 24. SECONDARY
  25. 25. TERTIARY (INTERMEDIATE)MADE BY MIXING A PRIMARY COLOR WITH A SECONDARY COLOR
  26. 26. TERTIARY
  27. 27. TINTS:ADDING WHITE TO A COLOR
  28. 28. TINTS:ADDING WHITE TO A COLOR
  29. 29. SHADES:ADDING BLACK TO A COLOR
  30. 30. SHADES:ADDING BLACK TO A COLOR
  31. 31. O V R Y G B
  32. 32. TONES:COLOR + ITS COMPLEMENT OR COLOR + GREY
  33. 33. MONOCHROMATICTINTS AND SHADES OF ONE (MONO) COLOR
  34. 34. MONOCHROMATICTINTS AND SHADES OF ONE (MONO) COLOR
  35. 35. MONOCHROMATIC
  36. 36. MONOCHROMATICMonochromatic color schemes look clean and elegant
  37. 37. Analogous ColorCOLORS NEXT TO ONE ANOTHER ON THE COLOR WHEEL
  38. 38. Analogous An analogous color scheme is well coordinated and calming
  39. 39. Analogous
  40. 40. Complementary ColorsACROSS FROM ONE ANOTHER ON THE COLOR WHEEL. PLACING COMPLEMENTS NEXT TOONE ANOTHER MAKE EACH APPEAR BRIGHTER
  41. 41. COMPLEMENTARYComplementary color schemes look very intense and can be overpowering in large doses
  42. 42. Split-ComplementaryCOLORS ON EITHER SIDE OF A COLOR’S COMPLEMENT
  43. 43. SPLIT- COMPLEMENTARYA split-complementary color scheme has high contrast and is very vivid and intense.
  44. 44. TriadicTHREE COLORS SPACED EQUALLY APART ON THE COLOR WHEEL
  45. 45. TRIADICTriadic color schemes are very vibrant and so it’s best to carefully balance them by letting one color dominate the other two.
  46. 46. TRIADIC
  47. 47. Tetradic or Rectangular FOUR COLORS ARRANGED INTO TWO COMPLEMENTARY PAIRS
  48. 48. TETRADIC Looks rich and warm. Tetradic color schemes works best if you let one color be dominant.  You should also pay attention to the balance between warm and cool colors in your design.
  49. 49. SQUAREFOUR COLORS EVENLY SPACED APART FROM ONE ANOTHER ON THE COLOR WHEEL
  50. 50. SQUARE Square color schemes works best if you let one color be dominant.  You should also pay attention to the balance between warm and cool colors in your design
  51. 51. WARM VS. COOL
  52. 52. WARM COLORS •  Reds; Oranges; Yellows •  reminiscent of fire •  advance (come forward) towards the viewer •  Tend to be vibrant and stimulating. Yellow-Green and Red-Violet can be considered either warm or cool.
  53. 53. WARM
  54. 54. COOL COLORS •  Blues; Greens; Violets •  reminiscent of water •  recede (go backwards) away from the viewer, •  Tend to be calming and soothing •  Yellow-Green and Red-Violet can be considered either warm or cool.
  55. 55. COOL
  56. 56. NEUTRALS •  also known as achromatic color (absence of color) •  includes grays, white, black and sometimes brown.
  57. 57. NEUTRAL Neutral schemes are calming and unified
  58. 58. EARTH TONES •  browns, tans, grays, greens, oranges, whites, and some reds •  The colors in an earth tone scheme are muted and flat in an emulation of the natural colors found in soil, moss, trees and rocks •  Many earth tones originate from clay earth pigments such as umber, ochre, and sienna
  59. 59. EARTH TONES Earth tone color schemes are warm, muted and calming
  60. 60. Color Meanings •  Red •  Red is the color of fire and blood, so it is associated with energy, war, danger, strength, power, determination as well as passion, desire, and love. •  Red is a very emotionally intense color. It enhances human metabolism, increases respiration rate, and raises blood pressure. It has very high visibility, which is why stop signs, stoplights, and fire equipment are usually painted red. In heraldry, red is used to indicate courage. It is a color found in many national flags. •  Red brings text and images to the foreground. Use it as an accent color to stimulate people to make quick decisions; it is a perfect color for Buy Now or Click Here buttons on Internet banners and websites. In advertising, red is often used to evoke erotic feelings (red lips, red nails, red-light districts, Lady in Red, etc). Red is widely used to indicate danger (high voltage signs, traffic lights). This color is also commonly associated with energy, so you can use it when promoting energy drinks, games, cars, items related to sports and high physical activity. •  Light red represents joy, sexuality, passion, sensitivity, and love. Pink signifies romance, love, and friendship. It denotes feminine qualities and passiveness. Dark red is associated with vigor, willpower, rage, anger, leadership, courage, longing, malice, and wrath. Brown suggests stability and denotes masculine qualities. Reddish-brown is associated with harvest and fall.
  61. 61. Color Meanings •  Orange •  Orange combines the energy of red and the happiness of yellow. It is associated with joy, sunshine, and the tropics. Orange represents enthusiasm, fascination, happiness, creativity, determination, attraction, success, encouragement, and stimulation. •  To the human eye, orange is a very hot color, so it gives the sensation of heat. Nevertheless, orange is not as aggressive as red. Orange increases oxygen supply to the brain, produces an invigorating effect, and stimulates mental activity. It is highly accepted among young people. As a citrus color, orange is associated with healthy food and stimulates appetite. Orange is the color of fall and harvest. In heraldry, orange is symbolic of strength and endurance. •  Orange has very high visibility, so you can use it to catch attention and highlight the most important elements of your design. Orange is very effective for promoting food products and toys. •  Dark orange can mean deceit and distrust. Red-orange corresponds to desire, sexual passion, pleasure, domination, aggression, and thirst for action. Gold evokes the feeling of prestige. The meaning of gold is illumination, wisdom, and wealth. Gold often symbolizes high quality.
  62. 62. Color Meanings •  Yellow •  Yellow is the color of sunshine. Its associated with joy, happiness, intellect, and energy. •  Yellow produces a warming effect, arouses cheerfulness, stimulates mental activity, and generates muscle energy. Yellow is often associated with food. Bright, pure yellow is an attention getter, which is the reason taxicabs are painted this color. When overused, yellow may have a disturbing effect; it is known that babies cry more in yellow rooms. Yellow is seen before other colors when placed against black; this combination is often used to issue a warning. In heraldry, yellow indicates honor and loyalty. Later the meaning of yellow was connected with cowardice. •  Use yellow to evoke pleasant, cheerful feelings. You can choose yellow to promote childrens products and items related to leisure. Yellow is very effective for attracting attention, so use it to highlight the most important elements of your design. Men usually perceive yellow as a very lighthearted, childish color, so it is not recommended to use yellow when selling prestigious, expensive products to men – nobody will buy a yellow business suit or a yellow Mercedes. Yellow is an unstable and spontaneous color, so avoid using yellow if you want to suggest stability and safety. Light yellow tends to disappear into white, so it usually needs a dark color to highlight it. Shades of yellow are visually unappealing because they loose cheerfulness and become dingy. •  Dull (dingy) yellow represents caution, decay, sickness, and jealousy. Light yellow is associated with intellect, freshness, and joy.
  63. 63. Color Meanings •  Green is the color of nature. It symbolizes growth, harmony, freshness, and fertility. Green has strong emotional correspondence with safety. Dark green is also commonly associated with money. •  Green has great healing power. It is the most restful color for the human eye; it can improve vision. Green suggests stability and endurance. Sometimes green denotes lack of experience; for example, a greenhorn is a novice. In heraldry, green indicates growth and hope. Green, as opposed to red, means safety; it is the color of free passage in road traffic. •  Use green to indicate safety when advertising drugs and medical products. Green is directly related to nature, so you can use it to promote green products. Dull, darker green is commonly associated with money, the financial world, banking, and Wall Street. •  Dark green is associated with ambition, greed, and jealousy. Yellow-green can indicate sickness, cowardice, discord, and jealousy. Aqua is associated with emotional healing and protection. Olive green is the traditional color of peace.
  64. 64. Color Meanings •  Blue is the color of the sky and sea. It is often associated with depth and stability. It symbolizes trust, loyalty, wisdom, confidence, intelligence, faith, truth, and heaven. •  Blue is considered beneficial to the mind and body. It slows human metabolism and produces a calming effect. Blue is strongly associated with tranquility and calmness. In heraldry, blue is used to symbolize piety and sincerity. •  You can use blue to promote products and services related to cleanliness (water purification filters, cleaning liquids, vodka), air and sky (airlines, airports, air conditioners), water and sea (sea voyages, mineral water). As opposed to emotionally warm colors like red, orange, and yellow; blue is linked to consciousness and intellect. Use blue to suggest precision when promoting high-tech products. •  Blue is a masculine color; according to studies, it is highly accepted among males. Dark blue is associated with depth, expertise, and stability; it is a preferred color for corporate America. •  Avoid using blue when promoting food and cooking, because blue suppresses appetite. When used together with warm colors like yellow or red, blue can create high-impact, vibrant designs; for example, blue-yellow-red is a perfect color scheme for a superhero. •  Light blue is associated with health, healing, tranquility, understanding, and softness. Dark blue represents knowledge, power, integrity, and seriousness.
  65. 65. Color Meanings •  Purple combines the stability of blue and the energy of red. Purple is associated with royalty. It symbolizes power, nobility, luxury, and ambition. It conveys wealth and extravagance. Purple is associated with wisdom, dignity, independence, creativity, mystery, and magic. •  According to surveys, almost 75 percent of pre- adolescent children prefer purple to all other colors. Purple is a very rare color in nature; some people consider it to be artificial. •  Light purple is a good choice for a feminine design. You can use bright purple when promoting childrens products. •  Light purple evokes romantic and nostalgic feelings. Dark purple evokes gloom and sad feelings. It can cause frustration.
  66. 66. Color Meanings •  White is associated with light, goodness, innocence, purity, and virginity. It is considered to be the color of perfection. •  White means safety, purity, and cleanliness. As opposed to black, white usually has a positive connotation. White can represent a successful beginning. In heraldry, white depicts faith and purity. •  In advertising, white is associated with coolness and cleanliness because its the color of snow. You can use white to suggest simplicity in high-tech products. White is an appropriate color for charitable organizations; angels are usually imagined wearing white clothes. White is associated with hospitals, doctors, and sterility, so you can use white to suggest safety when promoting medical products. White is often associated with low weight, low-fat food, and dairy products.
  67. 67. Color Meanings •  Black is associated with power, elegance, formality, death, evil, and mystery. •  Black is a mysterious color associated with fear and the unknown (black holes). It usually has a negative connotation (blacklist, black humor, black death). Black denotes strength and authority; it is considered to be a very formal, elegant, and prestigious color (black tie, black Mercedes). In heraldry, black is the symbol of grief. •  Black gives the feeling of perspective and depth, but a black background diminishes readability. A black suit or dress can make you look thinner. When designing for a gallery of art or photography, you can use a black or gray background to make the other colors stand out. Black contrasts well with bright colors. Combined with red or orange – other very powerful colors – black gives a very aggressive color scheme.
  68. 68. Color Theory and Your Apartment •  Select color schemes for the rooms you plan on creating a concept board/ scale model for •  Use the knowledge and notes you’ve gathered today, combined with the color meanings packet •  Think of what your client would want to have and how each room relates to one another
  69. 69. Concept Board Parameters •  fill paper provided •  title with your project title •  at least 3 of your own finished drawings (see specifics under step 5!) •  At least 6 pictures/photographs from internet/magazine/newspaper/etc •  color swatches for the color scheme of your apartment (either paint chips or created with drawing materials or paper) •  At least 3 textile swatches (real material or find examples; print and paste on) •  Neat, clean lettering (computer generated is better!) •  Clean, well planned layout •  Professional craftsmanship •  Easily communicates your concept to the class •  All components fit with your brief
  70. 70. Directions: Step 1 •  Browse the internet; design magazines; your design file created earlier in the year or take photographs of things that inspire you or you would like to include in your apartment
  71. 71. Directions: Step 2 •  Determine and write down what textures and materials you are planning for the apartment (note that you may have several options as you have more than 1 room! Just keep it unified!) –  Flooring – hardwoods; tile; cork; bamboo; carpet; linoleum; etc. –  Wall Coverings – wallpaper; fabric; paint; paint effects (feathering; linen-look painting; marbling) –  Furniture – upholstered; wood; plastic; glass; metals
  72. 72. Directions: Step 3 •  Determine and write down your focal points/points of emphasis –  What will be your ‘shining stars’ – pieces of your design that impress •  Focal points can be made with –  Color –  Texture –  Pattern –  Contrast –  Proportion –  Movement
  73. 73. Directions: Step 4 •  Collect materials –  From the writing you’ve completed in the previous steps, collect materials to use on your concept board –  Can’t find the material? Search the Internet or magazines for a high quality image OR create your own
  74. 74. For the rest of the day •  Work on your concept board •  You should be working on step 5 by next class •  Next class we will finish up your concept boards •  Following class: begin scale model of your floor plan
  75. 75. Directions: Step 5 •  Create your 3 original designs in pencil –  1 piece of furniture –  1 textile pattern - –  1 accessory; built-in or accent piece •  Fireplace •  Bookshelves •  Chandelier or Light Fixture •  Then complete the designs in either gouache or colored pencils •  Must be to the highest quality – a true work of art!
  76. 76. Directions: Step 6 •  Determine the layout you think is the most successful for all of the objects you’ve collected and created – SAVE ROOM FOR PROPER TITLING AND NOTES •  Think of what you want to emphasize – what is the focal point of your concept board? •  Plan out how you’ll create movement across the concept board to keep your client interested in the variety of samples, drawings and pictures you’ll have •  Play around with composition to find the best solution possible – remember that this is an ART project •  When you are satisfied, affix the objects to the concept board using either a glue stick or rubber cement – NOT WHITE GLUE!
  77. 77. Directions: Step 7 •  Make necessary annotations (notes) to help convey your complete concept •  Title with your apartment project’s title; the date and your name •  Use a professional lettering style – computer generated and printed is the best!
  78. 78. Directions: Step 8 •  Fill out the rubric and answer the reflection questions in complete sentences on the back of the rubric. •  Reflection Questions: •  Describe with 4 adjectives the design feel you are trying to convey in your concept board •  What is highly successful about your concept board? Nothing is not an answer. •  What could be changed about your concept board and how would changing this improve your concept board? Nothing is not an answer?

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