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The Anchor summer 2021 final

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Diversity in worship, faith and service.
This is the theme of the latest edition of The Anchor - the quarterly newsletter of Anglican Church of All Saints by the Lake Dorval.
Emerging from the restrictions of the pandemic, we now find ourselves embracing diverse ways of being and doing.
The past 16 months have afforded us the opportunity to reflect, regroup and reset. We now know that there are diverse ways of doing and being and they are all valid.

Diversity in worship, faith and service.
This is the theme of the latest edition of The Anchor - the quarterly newsletter of Anglican Church of All Saints by the Lake Dorval.
Emerging from the restrictions of the pandemic, we now find ourselves embracing diverse ways of being and doing.
The past 16 months have afforded us the opportunity to reflect, regroup and reset. We now know that there are diverse ways of doing and being and they are all valid.

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The Anchor summer 2021 final

  1. 1. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com THE ANCHOR Summer 2021 Anglican Church of All Saints by the Lake Reconciling, Affirming, Rejoicing In Focus Diversity in worship, faith & service • Different ways to worship – outdoors, Messy Church, Evening worship • Journeys of faith and service • Tributes to people of faith In this issue Parish noticeboard ……2 Rev.’s writings…….3 In Focus ……5 What’s happening in your parish….21 Anglicans in Canada & worldwide……24 In my opinion…..31 The last word…34
  2. 2. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com PARISH NOTICE BOARD FOR YOUR CALENDAR All in-person church services are cancelled until September 12. Read more below about our online Morning and Evening Prayer services and other activities. Stay in touch during the COVID-19 Crisis Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Anglican-Church- of-All-Saints-by-the-Lake-Dorval- 375181346541233 Morning Prayer at 10am on Sundays Zoom link will be sent in advance by email every week Church at the Park Sundays at 4:00 p.m. Cedar Heights Park Evening Prayer at 5pm, Mon-Sat: https://zoom.us/j/258384963?pwd=TTJuSm80 QVhFMmhpaS9iUFc2L0ZEdz09 Meeting id number: 258384963 or by telephone: 438 809 7799 Password: 497227 Coffee on the Lawn 9-11 AM on Tuesdays (with Thursdays as a rain date). No Messy Church in July & August PRAYER CARE June; Janie and John; Eileen; Gordona and Leonard; Brenda; Gary; June; Judy; Nancy; Clara; Dani; Marlene; Heather and Ture; Michael; Veta; Betty; Robert; Don; George; Louise; Miriam; Sylvia; Alice; Myrna; Thomas; Margaret; Susan; Andra; Shelby. A BIG shout out! A BIG shout out to our dedicated technical team – Louis, Dave, David, and Ross – who work tirelessly to make sure our services run smoothly. Do you need help? Dave Hill: 514-694-6255 David Tomsons: 514-694-3794 Ross Hamilton: 514-240-2004
  3. 3. Rev.’s writings 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 3 Dear brothers and sisters in Christ, In my last newsletter column, I wrote about how the “After Times” were in sight but the transition to the “new normal” might be rockier than we expected. And indeed, although cases have dropped back to the levels they were at in the summer of 2020, and the whole province is now in a Green Zone, the pandemic continues to impact our daily lives. Members of the congregation are in very different places as far as their feelings and risk tolerance are concerned. At the moment, our “grand re-opening” is scheduled for September 12, and we pray that nothing happens to change those plans! While the Green Zone designation still comes with restrictions, Archdeacon Robert Camara has informed us that the government intends to review and (hopefully) relax its policies again around the end of August, leading us to hope that we might be able to have a full church and sing together on that occasion. Guidelines have already been issued permitting choirs to sing again under some circumstances, so the indications are promising! The Corporation, acting on a suggestion from a wise parish member, is proposing an informal moratorium of six months from the September reopening before making any major decisions, particularly about the building. We need time to remember what it’s like to be together, and to figure out what has changed and what remains the same. We need time to adjust to the changes in our worship space (the elevator, the screens) and discern what might come next. During this time of reflection, we will use the program proposed by Primate Linda Nicholls, “Surprised by the Spirit,” to reflect on our experiences of the pandemic and share those reflections along with those of Anglicans across Canada. We will also begin the process of fundraising to pay ourselves back for the elevator project and think about how to reopen the conversation about further building modifications (including the much-longed-for kitchen renovation!). In our most recent parish meeting, at the end of May, we discussed the question of what to do with the stone font from St. Andrew’s, which was damaged and then reassembled during the elevator installation. It’s clear that neither putting it in the chapel nor moving it outside is a practical long-term solution for a number of reasons, so it will probably end up either at
  4. 4. Rev.’s writings 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 4 the back of the centre aisle or in the corner by the sacristy; no final determination has been made yet. However, the conversation revealed that there is learning to be done and conversation to be had about a number of interrelated topics: sacred space, liturgy, the relationship of both to fellowship and outreach, how to welcome people with little to no church background and accommodate people of all ages and abilities, and the whole question of what our buildings and furniture are for. Pausing major decisions until next spring will give us the chance to engage these questions without the pressure to immediately make decisions and start projects. I pray for a restful and restorative summer for all, and I look forward to seeing more of you in person soon! In Christ’s peace, Grace+
  5. 5. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 5 DIFFERENT WAYS TO WORSHIP Church outdoors Worship and fellowship for our children It was another beautiful Sunday morning. Summer was around the corner, the neighbourhood was coming alive again after a long winter indoors, and we were sitting around the computer screen, shushing three small noisy kids, and trying to hear some small bit of the scriptures from that week. My heart was definitely not feeling receptive to God, shall we say. And when Jonathan (5) said, “I wish we could be like our neighbours and not have to do church!”, that heart just broke wide open. Clearly, this wasn’t working, and what’s worse, I was unconsciously teaching my kids that “doing church” was a chore to be endured while everyone else got to have fun. Sounds familiar to anyone who has lived through this past year with kids in the house, right? After too many hours spent on Zoom over the past 16 months, we had all reached our breaking point. “Come on guys, we’re skipping church and heading to the park this morning instead,” and off we went. The kids played with the usual exuberance of 3- and 5-year-olds who needed to be outside, the baby napped in the carrier, and I listened to some of my favourite worship music while trying not to feel guilty about
  6. 6. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 6 skipping. But just as church is not just the building in which we meet, neither does it have to be sitting alone in our living room. At its core, church is people, it is community, and it is extending grace and welcome to our neighbours. In fact, some of the “churchiest” times I have experienced since becoming a parent have not been at a traditional Sunday morning service, but in a basement on weekday mornings for playgroup. Playgroups gather folks together who otherwise wouldn’t have met, bond them over the shared experience of parenting tiny humans, and provide a safe, easy place to come as you are, noise and all. Just like what church could be. So in an entirely self-serving way, I thought to myself: how can I reclaim that sense of playgroup community, be able to worship with fellow believers, and remind the kids (and myself, if I’m being totally honest) that church doesn’t have to be an obligation, but a joy? Our local park seemed like a good place to start. We love making music and singing familiar worship songs, so I brushed up on my very mediocre ukulele skills and started singing some favourites that would hopefully be accessible to our youngest friends. I pulled out our well loved storybook Bibles and invited a few young families to meet us at the park for an alternative to zoom church. And friends, let me tell you: it’s messy, noisy, chaotic - and I’m not just talking about my ukulele playing, though that certainly contributes. It’s also beautiful, and grace-filled, and a balm for my soul to be meeting with other families, singing Jesus-y songs, and letting children be children. What to expect when you come to Park Church? We spread out our blankets and sing a few songs. I read a Bible story and we talk about God. We pray. Then we break out whatever food anyone has brought, share the contents of our fridges and lives, and grow together as a community. It reminds me of one of my favourite verses: “... we were like young children among you. Just as a nursing mother cares for her children, so we cared for you. Because we loved you so much, we were delighted to share with you not only the gospel of God but our lives as well.” (1 Thess. 2: 7-8) From Paul’s writings about the earliest Christian communities, I suspect that the earliest versions of church looked very much like playdates, dinner parties, or park church. It certainly seems like the kind of thing Jesus would have enjoyed. And really, isn’t that what being a Christ-follower should be about - creating spaces where Jesus can be found, in and amidst the chaos of everyday life? - Submitted by Rebecca Lekx
  7. 7. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 7 Messy Church Another way of sharing the Message! Messy Church is a form of Church for children and adults that involves creativity, celebration and hospitality. It includes all ages, adults, and children. It’s primarily for people who don’t already belong to another form of church and for people at all stages of their faith. The aim of Messy Church is to introduce Jesus, to give an opportunity to encounter Him and to grow closer to Him. Messy Church is not a club. The whole of Messy Church is about worshipping God, having fellowship, and exploring Christian faith. It welcomes everyone, involves everyone, values everyone, and is always there for the outsider. The first Messy Church in Canada was launched in April 2007 at St. George’s, Georgetown, ON, and quickly followed by others across the country. Messy Churches are found across Canada in a wide range of denominations in urban and rural communities, all focussed on building a Christ-centred community that is welcoming and great fun!
  8. 8. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 8 Messy Church at All Saints by the Lake has a good following of very regular attendees and not- so-regular attendees. What’s really important is that Messy Church is an important way in which we live out the great commission, to spread the good news and promoting good ways of growing as a family: a nuclear family, an extended family, and a global and local church family. The photos below speak for themselves. Breaking bread together. Sharing our talents and bringing the Bible to life – Christmas pageant 2019 This is how The Good Shepherd cares for His sheep Learning about the love of God through Jesus in the world We are all God’s children – learning, creating and enjoying our time together Diverse ways of learning and expressing ourselves
  9. 9. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 9 Evening worship A safe space for fellowship and faith Why would a dozen people meet on Zoom six days of the week just before suppertime? The question was asked during the regular post-worship conversation period. The common theme in the responses of the twelve regular attendees was ‘fellowship’. The members of this group are interestingly diverse – a busy working Mom with three young children, transplanted Montrealers who now live in Ontario and B.C., members of nearby and not-so-nearby churches, a couple grieving the loss of a parent, a few others who feel the need for regular fellowship in a small group. The virtual Evening Prayer meetings were launched by Rev’d Grace at the beginning of the pandemic lockdown, when there was fear, panic, and isolation. The meetings were intended to break isolation and provide a forum for mutual support and fellowship. Although they enjoy Sunday Morning Prayer, the meetings on the evenings of the other days of the week, are a gift. For the busy Mom, it’s a place of calm, where she can get even closer to
  10. 10. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 10 God. For the couple who couldn’t get to see their elderly parents who were in a residence, the group provided much needed support to get through that difficult time. For another participant, sharing his musical talent online was a source of relief and joy, helping to break the feeling of being restricted, particularly in the early months of the pandemic. For the transplanted Montrealers, seeing familiar faces online is reassuring as they adjust to their new homes and cities under restrictive conditions. Worship is lead by a roster of regular attendees. Although worship follows a planned format, there is a period for spontaneous prayers. The printed version of the worship service is sent to participants who are unable to join via Zoom. There is always a 15-minute post-worship check- in. Conversations filled with laughter and updates on what’s happening in each other’s lives is as important to the participants, who now call themselves the “Zoomites,” the 13th tribe of Israel! They all agree that Evening Prayer is a keeper! They will continue to worship together, and welcome anyone who wants to join, even after the pandemic restrictions are lifted. Evening Prayer meetings are held on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 5pm. Please see the Church Calendar on page 2 and What’s happening in your Parish page 23 for connection details. "For me, Evening Prayer was a fixed point in a turning world throughout the pandemic. No matter how anxious, alone and upset I felt, I could always look forward to 5 o'clock, when I could take my mind off the situation and fix my eyes on God along with fellow believers whom I came to know and share some of my life with over the days and months we attended Evening Prayer over Zoom. I don't know what I would have done without it and the Zoomites to see me through the crisis." - Belva, member of St. Stephen's Lachine "On a positive note, Evening Prayer gives one the opportunity to get to know people, especially if you are a so-called newcomer. At coffee hour after a service, people tend to converse with people they know. Evening Prayer has widened the prospect of getting to know more people." - Marguerite, member of All Saints by the Lake JOURNEYS OF FAITH
  11. 11. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 11 Dion Lewis A testimony of faith, worship, & service I am a first-generation Canadian of Barbadian descent, working in the corporate travel industry for the last 20 years, and a participating churchgoer for my whole life. Music draws me in, especially making music with other people. Choral singing, as I see it, is a perfect example of how many parts and voices can come together and blend in order to produce something that is more than the individual but still dependent on the individual. Singing is an easy way to share my feelings and my faith. I use my voice to sing about all aspects of the human condition, and about God, with my whole person, while hopefully trying to raise spirits, energize people for the week, and encourage participation. I have always enjoyed participating in worship services. I was encouraged to join the Cathedral choir by friends of my parents when I was in elementary school. This was my first exposure to church life outside of my home parish and not in Sunday School! I wanted to know what else was going on upstairs. It was with the choir cohort that I went through confirmation classes. I took a summer off and was able to join the adult choir at St James the Apostle as one of the youngest members. For 2 summers I was a travelling team member and day camp counselor for Crosstalk Ministries, an Anglican-based Christian organization, that ran a weeklong program in different churches in cities and towns across Ontario and Quebec. “When we gather, we have to listen to each other and blend.” “Being quiet together is just as important as being loud together.” “I believe that we do have all that we need to be the best ambassadors for Christ in the world.” - Dion Lewis, Parish Cantor
  12. 12. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 12 “The message that we are trying to communicate is universal but not everyone will hear the same message at the same time.” I was always on the lookout for new ways of reaching out to other people. Years ago, the diocese used to sponsor a Youth synod, and that is when I got roped into the policymaking and advocating side of the faith, in the world and not just at church. Enthusiastically I was drawn into the management of the concerns discussed and brought forth at the youth synod, so I was elected to become a member of the Youth Unit. The youth unit morphed into the Youth Council. This body was responsible for giving legs to the requests and concerns of the youth from synod over the year. During my time on Youth Council and just before everyone had internet at home, we published a quarterly newsletter and made presentations at Diocesan synod. After doing 2 years on the youth council, I moved on to help manage the organization of the Youth Synod itself as the chair of that planning committee. I did that for a couple of years; then I stayed on as a Young Adult Advisor. It was like a diocesan youth convention: we had guest speakers and clergy from all over, leading workshops, discussion groups, motion writing, and then the business of synod interspersed with multiple worship times. These events were encouraging for me, because they gave me tangible proof that other people were interested in these matters and wanted our church communities to practice what was being preached. This stayed with me. Youth Synod exposed me to Diocesan Synods, which in turn exposed me to the national church organization: the General Synod. Through being a member at the national synod, I have been able to give insight and direction on new worship resources and interdenominational relationships on the Faith Worship and Ministry Committee; I then served three years on the Communications and Information Resources Committee, which advised and worked with Anglican Video, the Anglican.ca website, and the former publishing arm of the National church. From there I was appointed to the Board of Directors of the Anglican Journal for 3 years.
  13. 13. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 13 While being involved with the national church, I kept up with my music-making; I joined 2 other community choirs. I was the Chairperson and section lead for the ‘New Exodus Singers’ (NES). The motto of the NES was “Singing in a relaxed and non-competitive atmosphere”. The committee organized for that choir 2 or 3 concerts a year. I miss this group so much around Palm Sunday weekend, because every other year we used to present Stainer’s Crucifixion. The other choir was the Montreal Intercultural Choir, where I was the assistant director for a handful of years; this choir has performed for Mandela's visit to Montreal as well as in multiple music festivals around Montreal, including being on the soundtrack for Cirque de Soleil’s show “Zumanity”. Personally, my current push is to complete my four-year Education for Ministry course. I am grateful for this course because it has given me a new way of looking at the scriptures and placing them in a different context, and has given me a new way to deepen my faith but also to challenge my beliefs: always remembering that to be true to the practice of Christianity requires a day-to-day commitment. - Submitted by Dion Lewis, Parish Cantor
  14. 14. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 14 Inga Lawson - Volunteer Extraordinaire Faithful service The best way to describe how our relationship with Inga and Nova Hudson began is to let her recount the story in her own words. On Friday September 27, 2019, at a Hope for Dementia fundraiser at Whitlock in Hudson, I met Bob for the first time and the conversation went something like this: ‘’So what do you do to keep busy now that you are retired?’’ I asked Bob. ‘’Visit prisons’’ he says. After my initial shock I quickly recovered and asked, ‘’Do they take clothing?’’ ‘’No’’ he says, ‘’but the Red Roof (St Michael’s) Mission does’’. ‘’If I drive to Dorval with donations can you take it to the Mission from there?’’ “Sure’’ he says. And that is how Inga, working at Nova Boutique in Hudson, linked up with All Saints by the Lake delivering gently used men’s clothing and books to St Michael’s. A little background: Inga is a long time active member of Wyman United Church, and over the years has successfully run their Christmas Bazaar and Annual Book Sale and created and cared for their 100 year anniversary gardens. She has been a volunteer with Boutique Hudson from its beginning 16 years ago. When Inga is not filling her car with bags of clothing and books for the Mission she is an avid tennis player and curler in addition to tending her own garden or anyone else’s if they need a hand. Sounds like she would fit right in at All Saints. Since that fortunate first meeting Inga regularly makes the run from Hudson to Dorval with her vehicle packed with bags and boxes of books, timing her visits to coincide with our regular end of the month trip delivering items collected in the red barrel and the food of the month donations. The Elantra’s storage capacity is sorely tested with a jam-packed trunk, back seat piled to the roof and overflowing onto the front passenger seat. There are times when getting everything to fit seems like mission impossible but
  15. 15. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 15 Inga, the determined master packer, always prevails. During the worst of the pandemic when our church was closed, except for a brief period in late summer, Inga’s trips to Dorval continued unabated. On one occasion she came to the Mission, shoe-horned into the front seat on top of the books, and she got to see St Michael’s firsthand and meet some of the staff. Able to see how little storage space was available, Inga would call Julie at the Mission the week before each delivery to find out just what their current needs were, and custom pack each bag. During all the months when we were unable to collect clothing and food, Inga enabled us to continue to meet the needs of the needy and homeless and stay in regular contact with the Mission. There was an instance last month, the day before a scheduled delivery, when the Ile aux Tourtes Bridge was shut down indefinitely, creating gridlock on the only road left onto the island. Inga found an App with the latest update on traffic and made it to Dorval anyway. We were blessed on that day back in 2019 and are extremely grateful to have Inga as part of our outreach team, hopefully for a long time to come! - Written by Bob Morell with contributions from Inga Lawson The stockroom at St. Michael’s Mission
  16. 16. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 16 TRIBUTES TO PEOPLE OF FAITH Their legacies live on! Mervyn Shields Good afternoon everyone and thank you for being here today. I would like to say a few words on behalf of Mervyn’s grandchildren Paige, Jack, Brooke, Erin, Kurt and myself. As Prince would say, we are all gathered here today to get through this thing called life, and where there’s life there’s good times and harder times. Today, is one of those hard times for many of us: it is a day where we are finishing a chapter in Papa’s book but it doesn’t end there. He will always be with us, in our hearts, our memories and as our guardian angel. He had a long, fulfilling life and provided us with endless laughter, smiles and love. As grandkids we were very lucky to have a Papa like him. I remember when we were very little, and he would play his guitar for us and we would dance together with whatever rhythm we had at that age. I think we can all agree that the rhythm we have today came from Papa because he sure did have some sweet dance moves. There was also a chin up bar in the storage room at their house that he would help us reach just so we could all hang from it, ‘cause let’s face it, he was the strongest man in the house (sorry Dad and Uncle Norm). This last year he showed us how strong of a man he really was and let me tell you, Rocky Balboa would be very jealous. No matter the day, he always did his best to remain in bright spirits. I will forever cherish the moments I got to spend with him, whether it was having a karaoke session in the hospital and singing Bohemian Rhapsody, or having nighttime tea and Boston cream donuts; but the best of all was when he tried Rockaberry’s apple pie for the first time. That was a real GAME CHANGER. Now you might be wondering, “is all that they eat together for dessert?” Yes, it really is, because that’s who I got my sweet tooth from. Now you see, as I mentioned before, his book doesn’t end here but rather, we as grandkids and our parents are a continuation of his life because without him, we wouldn’t be here today. - Written and presented by Merv & Maureen Shields’ granddaughter Courtney at Merv’s funeral service
  17. 17. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 17 Russ Peden I remember two large hands gently grabbing my waistband, hoisting me up into the air. I am four years old, five, at the most, yet I feel like the world already belongs to me. I can’t believe how high I am and how safe I feel in Grandpa’s bear arms. Grandpa is the very definition of a big friendly giant. The “giant” part is genetic, but the friendly part is all him. Whether it be at my piano concerts, where he happily relinquished his first-row seat after the first few sighs from the other parents sitting behind, or the time we went to A&W and he got me first root beer (yes, he insisted I get the entire pint just for me. . .), he was never anything less than optimistic and cheerful. Grandpa also liked things to be simple. Every time we went over, I made a game out of asking him what his favourite meal was, because every time, he answered that it was what he was eating right then. He let my sisters and me “comb” his hair and put it up into pigtails even after Dad insisted we stop. Grandpa is really someone you can’t forget. His love for oatmeal, crosswords, and his oath to never let us put black pepper on his food (so he wouldn’t sneeze) will stay engraved in my mind forever. Then he would put me down just as gently as he had picked me up, wrapping his arms around me as I buried my face into his belly, always accompanied by a low bear growl on his part . . . almost as if he knew what I was thinking. - Written and presented by Barbara and Russ Peden’s granddaughter, Alexandra Peden
  18. 18. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 18 Norman Wilson My older brother Chris and I were fortunate. We had a wonderful dad, who loved and cared for us until his death (accelerated by COVID) on December 3rd, 2020. Born May 15th, 1927, in Chatham, Kent, England, he was the youngest of 3 brothers in a home life that was quite Victorian, by his father’s view of life. He attended the local Anglican school. He was a good student, and this continued throughout his life. He attended church through school and sang in the choir as many young English school boys do. Though singing never remained important to him, a good pub song and the little “ditties” he sang about, fishermen, wives, weather and how to be naughty, both amused and drove the family crazy some days, to his great delight. He worked hard in his life, from office boy in Shorts Bros’ aircraft in Chatham to, after the war, completing his apprenticeship with Shorts in Belfast Northern Ireland. As life would have it, he met a beautiful Irish girl named Margaret; they were soon married with 2 kids in tow. Canadair came looking for young engineers and we came to Canada. It became our beloved home even though we bounced back and forth a couple of times. We arrived with ration books in hand, not sure how things worked, confusing mum in the store when she asked “what do we do with the second chicken?” when confronted with 2 chickens in the same package. Dad had, from childhood, decided that his children would know their father and they would know he loved them. Years of play, holidays, treats and spanking the bed instead of us cemented that love in Chris and me. Life goes on, Chris and I married (maybe more than once), the family grew in-laws and the like; grandchildren Kurt, Heather and Sarah showed up, and Dad dove in, teasing, tickling and singing ditties. Dad changed jobs a couple of times and moved around because of it, most notably the 10 years in Edmonton, Alberta. But came home to Montreal to finish his career at Bombardier, who had bought Short Bros’ of Northern Ireland. His strength and loyalty saw mum through the hard years of her life as her health declined, until her death in 2008. Saddened and grieved for a time, his spirit was not to be extinguished: he found Mumsie!
  19. 19. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 19 Dorothy’s and Debbie’s mother Betty had hit it off with Dad after knowing each other within the family for 40 years. Well, nine further years of teasing, tickling, and of course singing little ditties ensued. Cruises and trips were made (within reason!); happens when you get married at 84! Joy, companionship, and love were the hallmark of those 9 years. They looked after each other in the CHSLD until the night Daddy went to sleep and woke up in his heavenly home. Love you Dad! Bill & Dorothy - Written by Bill and Dorothy Wilson Shirley Logan With great sadness we announce the passing of our beloved family matriarch, Shirley Logan, on Saturday, June 19, 2021, at the age of 91. Shirl was born on May 5, 1930 in Montreal to the late Dorothy and George Ellicott. She married Donald Logan on September 8, 1951 and for the next 70 years they raised their family, worked together at Logan's Ltd, played a mean game of bridge on the West Island, and enjoyed each and every summer at Sixteen Island Lake. The last several decades at the lake were especially meaningful to Nanny Shirl as she got to enjoy so many wonderful times with all of her nine grandchildren. Shirley is survived by her husband Don Logan and their four children; John (Alison), David (Lisa), Janet (Lance) and Robert (Lynn). She leaves her nine loving grandchildren; Rob (Rachel), Connor (Gussie), Shawn (Charlie), Terra, Katherine, Kyle, Taurance, Lily and Sadie, great-grandson George, and her life-long best friend and sister Anne Johnson. Shirley and her husband Don have been members of this church since 1954. Parishioner Anne Johnson is Shirley's sister. We will always remember Shirley’s big, engaging smile and her faithful attendance at our 10:00 a.m. service. - Adapted from The Montreal Gazette Obituaries
  20. 20. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com IN 20 Ven. Gordon Guy Our beloved Gordon Guy passed away on February 2nd, 2021. He completed 50 years of faithful service as an Anglican ordained priest, 27 of which were as the parish priest of the Parish of St. Andrew & St. Mark. Upon retirement, he continued to worship with us until his death. As a permanent memorial to Gordon, David Hollomby, Gordon’s brother-in-law, purchased a beautiful Bloodgood Japanese Maple tree, which has been planted on the grounds of All Saints Church. It can be found on the front lawn just past the Church’s main entrance. There is a plaque at the base of the tree which reads as follows: Bloodgood Japanese Maple Tree/Érable du Japon “Bloodgood” Given in loving memory of the Venerable Gordon Guy Offert à la douce mémoire du Vénérable Gordon Guy 1934 – 2021 This plaque is attached to a piece of white quartz which was provided by Bill Yeomans. Our head gardener, Campbell Taylor, has placed an attractive ring of rocks around the tree. A bench has also been installed near-by for those who would like to sit and admire the tree and surrounding garden or enjoy some quiet contemplation. A dedication ceremony will be held in August.
  21. 21. What’s happening in our parish 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 21 21 FINANCIAL REPORT As we reach the halfway point of 2021, All Saints Church has been successful in meeting its expenses while having the resources to tackle major undertakings like the elevator project. Of some concern, is the fact that identifiable giving is more than $7,000 less than for the same period last year. We continue to benefit from the federal wage subsidy program and pay no diocesan assessment. In June we paid 31% of employment expenses. We don’t know when we will resume full payments. Ways to send in your donation as you are financially able: • Interac transfer to: allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com • Mail in cheque to All Saints by the Lake, 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval QC H9S 2C7 (Please use your numbered envelopes if you have them.) • Credit card through Canada Helps, see the “Donate button” on our website: www.pramchurch.org • PAR – monthly donations from your bank account. Contact Geoff Dowd, Envelope Secretary gdowd@trafalgar.qc.ca Another Way of Giving Gift of Securities Tax rules encourage the donation of marketable securities to churches and, in fact, all registered charities. There is no federal capital gains tax to pay on securities that have appreciated. The donor still receives a tax receipt for the full market value of the donation. For more information about this option, please contact Trevor Smith at t.w.smith@sympatico.ca. - Submitted by Trevor Smith
  22. 22. What’s happening in our parish 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 22 22 FELLOWSHIP Church at the park Assuming the weather cooperates, we will continue to meet regularly at 4 on Sunday afternoons, in Cedar Park Heights Park! Please feel free to bring any musical instruments, food, sand toys, or friends! Contact Rebecca Lekx for more information. rdlekx@gmail.com Coffee on the lawn Stacey Neale has kindly volunteered to organize some simple outdoor gatherings at the church for those who would like to partake of a cup of coffee (or lemonade) and a snack, from 9-11 AM on Tuesdays (with Thursdays as a rain date). Bring a lawn chair! If you'd like to contribute goodies, please let Stacey know! (514)631-9796 s.j.neale@sympatico.ca Evening worship Join us on Mondays to Saturdays at 5pm Click here for the Zoom link Meeting ID number: 258384963 Telephone: 438 809 7799 Password: 497227 Leaders: Stacey Neale, Bob McLachlan, Marie-Claude Martz, Bill Wilson, Rev'd Grace
  23. 23. What’s happening in our parish 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 23 23 OUTREACH St. Michael’s Mission The "food of the month" for July is cold breakfast cereal of any kind and the always popular Kraft Dinner. Please drop off your donations at the church in the boxes provided. The staff and clients of St. Michael’s deeply appreciate our food donations, which make a huge difference in the lives of the homeless and the financially challenged clients. Local food banks All Saints by the Lake supports food banks for Christian Action Chrétienne and Dorval Community Aid. Non-perishable food may be dropped off during office hours. REMINDERS ✓ In-church services will resume on Sunday September 12th, 2021. ✓ Rev. Grace will be on vacation as of July 19. We wish Rev. Grace and Peter a restful, well-deserved break. ✓ Summer Office Hours: 9:30am - 3:30pm Tuesdays, Thursdays & Fridays
  24. 24. Anglicans in Canada and worldwide 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 24 DIOCESE OF MONTREAL Anti-Racism Task Force launches a webpage A new page has been installed on the Diocesan website. The page provides resources and informtion to keep you up to date on the Anti Racism Task Force of the Diocese of Montreal. Your feedback is welcome. Contact Co-Chairs: Mr. Dion Lewis, Mr. Edward Yankie Mission Statement “To educate and increase awareness in the Anglican Diocese of Montreal of the history of racism and the church’s participation and complicity in racist practices, that we may properly repent. To equip and enable members of the diocese to confront and dismantle systemic racism and white supremacy inside and outside the church. To honour Christ’s presence in every human by building bridges, and by promoting and celebrating diversity in the church and the world.” Compline with Bishop Mary & Friends is on Summer Holiday After praying together on Facebook Live for 16 months, Compline with Bishop Mary & Friends is on summer holiday! Keep praying for one another. See you again before long. Stay tuned for details regarding our return …
  25. 25. Anglicans in Canada and worldwide 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 25 DIOCESE OF MONTREAL Another option for worship Christ Church Cathedral would like to plant a Contemplative/Taizé style service on Wednesday evenings, after work, starting in the fall. We are looking for laypeople who would be interested in helping to develop/lead this offering. If you have been yearning for a quiet, gentle, non doctrinal way to pray, this may be for you. If you are interested, contact Rev. Deborah Meister deborah.meister@montrealcathedral.ca Solidarity with the First Nations The discovery of a mass grave of hundreds of children at the site of a former Roman Catholic residential school has unleashed “heart-wrenching and profound grief” within the community, the Anglican Primate of Canada, the Most Rev’d Linda Nicholls, has said. The Bishop of Montreal, Rt. Rev’d Mary Irwin Gibson posted this message on her Facebook page on July1, traditionally celebrated as Canada Day: “Not able to celebrate in red and white this year. Joining in vigil and solidarity.” Note that between 1820 and 19689 the Anglican Church of Canada ran 36 residential schools. The Church’s leadership has declared its commitment to reconciliation. Apologies were issued in 1993 and 2019 for the devastating spiritual harm caused. Archbishop Nicholls in a recent statement said, “We know there are sites at Anglican residential schools where some graves are unmarked, or where records are incomplete. We are committed to working with Indigenous communities to assist to recover whatever information is available and to join in advocating for ground searches of those burial sites.”
  26. 26. Anglicans in Canada and worldwide 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 26 ANGLICAN CHURCH IN CANADA A message from our Primate, Archbishop Linda Nicholls We recently passed the one-year anniversary of the declaration of a global pandemic. This has been a time of extraordinary upheaval in our lives and the life of our churches. It has also been a time of discovery. We discovered the pain of many losses—personal and communal. We discovered that we are more resilient and more creative than we may have previously thought. We discovered God in our midst—and we have been Surprised by the Spirit. I invite you to gather again, as you did in early 2019, in ‘Conversation Circles’ to explore your discoveries and surprises, and to listen for the voice of the Spirit in your midst. We are beginning to see hope for an end to the pandemic as vaccinations roll out across the country. We will be able to gather in person for worship and community life. What have we learned? What is God calling us to now? What have we let go and do not need to reclaim? What surprises do we need to grieve? What surprises do we need to celebrate? What will we continue to do? What new sparks are flying in your imagination for the life of our congregations? Over the next five months, I invite you to have conversations in your parish, clericus, deanery, area or committee meetings or Diocese. A resource to guide the conversations is available on this website; it will help to lead your conversations through prayer, scripture reflection and your stories. Once you’ve shared in your conversation circle, I invite you to capture your circle’s “Spark” of surprise, which will include a learning, a question and a hope. You might choose to depict your Spark through: writing; in a video; in a poem; or, through another visual, audible or written format—let the Spirit guide you. Once you’ve discerned your Spark, I ask you to share it on this website, so it can be shared with fellow Anglicans across Canada. Our entire Church needs to hear from one another, as our journey continues. Sparks will be shared through the national website and gathered into a celebration for Thanksgiving 2021! This is an opportunity to listen to the Spirit—to listen to each other—and to celebrate what God is showing us now for our future together.
  27. 27. Anglicans in Canada and worldwide 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 27 Let us pray God of wind and flame, send your life-giving Spirit upon your people: give fire to our words, strength to our witness and boldness to our proclamation of your wondrous work in Christ; who, with you and the Spirit, lives and reigns now and forever. Amen. A message to the Members of the Lytton Anglican Parishes and the Territory of the People: Dear friends, We are all in shock at the tragic news of the fire in the village of Lytton, the Lytton First Nation, and surrounding areas. We wait in hope to learn whether all are safe. We are aware that many have lost homes and businesses and are displaced into other communities. We don’t know the whole extent of the damage, but it is widespread and devastating. We are keeping the people of the Lytton village and the Nlaka’pamux people in our prayers. We are praying for Angus Muir, priest in the community, for the pastoral elders Amy Charlie, Dorothy Phillips, Ernie and Pauline Michell, Ursula Drynock, and all church members as they offer a ministry of love and compassion in a time when they deal with their own losses. We are praying for all in leadership: for Acting Chief John Haugen, for Mayor Jan Polderman, for firefighters and fire response teams, first responders, and local and provincial emergency response teams. As we come to discover the scope of this disaster and learn of practical ways support can be offered, we will continue listening for how we can provide assistance. The Territory Office is collecting financial donations for immediate needs, clearly marked “Lytton Fire.”
  28. 28. Anglicans in Canada and worldwide 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 28 In the meantime, we want to assure the members of the Nlaka’pamux Nation and the Village of Lytton that the Territory of the People walks together with all who the fire has so forcefully impacted A Prayer: O God, you are our refuge and our strength, our help in times of trouble: Have mercy on the lands and communities devastated by fires, and especially the people of the village of Lytton and Lytton First Nations. Have mercy on those who have lost homes and livelihoods. Protect those who have had to evacuate. Bless and keep safe all firefighters. And strengthen those who seek to rebuild hope that all may face the future without fear. We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ, our Saviour. Amen. May grace and peace be with all, Archbishop Lynne McNaughton Bishop Gordon Light Bishop Barbara Andrews On behalf of the: Territory Interim Steering Committee: Bishop Barbara Andrews Ms. Melissa Green The Rev. Jo Ann Hinter Bishop Gordon Light The Rev. Barbara Liotscos Archbishop Lynne McNaughton Mr. Ernie Mitchell Mrs. Margaret Mitchell The Rev. Angus Muir
  29. 29. Anglicans in Canada and worldwide 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 29 ANGLICAN CHURCH WORLDWIDE ANGLICANS JOIN OTHER FAITH LEADERS IN GLOBAL CALL FOR AN END TO “VACCINE NATIONALISM” Anglicans from around the world have added their names to an open letter written by faith leaders calling for an end to vaccine nationalism. Prominent Anglicans have added their names to a letter written by faith leaders from around the world calling for an increase in the production of Covid vaccines, and an end to vaccine nationalism. The Secretary General of the Anglican Communion, Dr Josiah Idowu-Fearon, is amongst the prominent Anglicans to sign the letter, which has also been endorsed by Dr Rowan Williams, the former Archbishop of Canterbury; Dr Thabo Makgoba, Archbishop of Cape Town; John Davies, Archbishop of Wales; John McDowell, Archbishop of Armagh; Archbishop Linda Nicholls, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada; Mark Strange, Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church; and Dr Mouneer Anis, Archbishop of Alexandria. They are amongst almost 150 religious leaders who have signed the letter. They are asking leaders at next month’s G7 meeting for a commitment to take all the necessary steps to ensure a global programme of vaccination is undertaken as “a global common good”. The letter said: “the access of people to life-saving Covid-19 vaccines cannot be dependent on people’s wealth, status, or nationality. We cannot abdicate our responsibilities to our sisters and brothers by imagining that the market can be left to resolve the crisis or pretend to ourselves that we have no obligation to others in our shared humanity. Every person is precious. We have a moral obligation to reach everyone, in every country.” The call comes as part of action from the People’s Vaccine Alliance, a coalition of organisations and activists campaigning for a “people’s vaccine” for Covid-19, which would be based on shared knowledge and freely available to everyone everywhere. Fionna Smyth, head of global advocacy and policy for the UK-based development agency Christian Aid, said: “we know that our best chance of all staying safe is to ensure Covid-19 vaccines are available for all as a global common good as soon as possible. This will only be possible with a transformation in how vaccines are produced and distributed – pharmaceutical
  30. 30. Anglicans in Canada and worldwide 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 30 corporations must allow the Covid-19 vaccines to be produced as widely as possible by sharing their knowledge free from patents. We need a People’s Vaccine, not a profit vaccine.” In an article written for British newspaper The Guardian, Rowan Williams said that the G7 must act to end “vaccine apartheid”. He said: “Future generations will look back with incredulity at our failure so far to do what is necessary for global public health in the course of this pandemic”. The religious leaders concluded their letter by saying: “this unprecedented public health crisis calls, above all, for global solidarity, for all people to stand together as brothers and sisters. The same spirit of unity and common purpose that has driven scientists to develop Covid-19 vaccines at breathtaking speed, that drives the care of those tending to the sick, must also inspire the leaders of government, civil society and the private sector to massively ramp up vaccine production so there are sufficient doses for every person in the world to be vaccinated. “As religious leaders, we join our voices to the call for vaccines that are made available to all people as a global common good – a People’s Vaccine. This is the only way to end the pandemic.” Source: Press release dated May 7, 2021, on Anglican News Services website accessed 9 July 2021
  31. 31. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 31 IN MY OPINION… LET GOD GROW YOUR FAITH. STEP OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE. 22 Then they came to Bethsaida; and some people brought a blind man to Jesus and begged Him to touch him. 23 Taking the blind man by the hand, He led him out of the village; and after spitting on his eyes and laying His hands on him, He asked him, “Do you see anything?” 24 And he looked up and said, “I see people, but [they look] like trees, walking around.” 25 Then again Jesus laid His hands on his eyes; and the man stared intently and [his sight] was [completely] restored, and he began to see everything clearly. 26 And He sent him to his home, saying, “Do not even enter the village.” Jesus heals the blind man in Bethsaida – Mark’s gospel, chapter 8 verses 22 – 26 There are three things that strike me about the blind man’s encounter with Jesus. 1. He was willing to get out of his comfort zone – his village, his familiar location – and follow Jesus to receive his healing. Jesus took the blind man out of the village. Sometimes God will take us out of our comfort zone to receive His grace in a different way. We may have the faith to receive, but the influence of other people can dilute our ability to grow in faith and trust in God.
  32. 32. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 32 Sometimes God has a special call on our lives. It means that we just have to stop following the crowd that’s following Jesus and get into our own space with Him. It may well be that the Bible study group or church service is no longer nourishing you spiritually. • It is possible that God is calling you to a new way of serving or to a higher level of spiritual awareness? It takes courage and faith to step away from conventional ways of doing things, to step away from the expected path. It is comforting to know that Jesus works with the faith that we have. 2. The blind man surrendered to Jesus’ unconventional way of healing and therefore grew his faith in God. Unlike other healing events, Jesus healed the blind man in phases. Firstly, Jesus spat on the blind man’s eyes. In ancient cultures, saliva was widely believed to have healing properties. Realizing that the blind man may have been struggling in faith, Jesus appealed to the man’s belief in human healing and to his growing faith in the supernatural healing power of God. The blind man took a first step of faith by saying what he saw – men as trees walking – which seemed bizarre, but he answered Jesus’ question honestly and kept trusting, even though he did not see exactly as he was expecting to see. • I believe that the blind man’s honesty opened the way for his complete healing. Jesus then used a simple touch to encourage the man to extend his faith fully in God. Instead of being satisfied with the partial healing, the blind man continued to trust Jesus to heal him and he ‘looked intently’ such that his vision was restored perfectly. 3. He accepted Jesus’ charge to start a new life elsewhere. When his vision was fully restored, Jesus sent the healed man to his home, not back to the village, and not tell anyone there. I suspect that going back to the village would have been a return to the past, which was not the place where the previously blind man would have flourished. When God takes us away from our comfort zone and grows our faith elsewhere, it is usually because He wants us to forge a new path and do new things. Too often when we have a life-transforming experience, there is the tendency to repeatedly recount how we got to where we are, and not focus on what we have been called to do. • The intention of any transformation is to enable and empower us to live and serve differently.
  33. 33. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 33 The blind man’s expectation was only to have Jesus touch him. He was expecting to have his sight restored so that he could live a normal life. The restoration of the blind man’s sight turned out to be a call to live a new life in a new place. Although we don’t know what eventually happened to the man with the restored sight, we would do well to learn from this miracle, that God’s blessings are not only for us, but to be used to serve Him in new ways. Being open to God’s direction, stepping out in faith, even if you feel afraid, will lead to an amazing, enriched life and ministry. - Adapted from an article published on Glorymatters blog by Camille Isaacs-Morell YOUR OPINION COUNTS! Is there a perspective or commentary on a particular topic you would like to share? Politics, spirituality, current events, health…. You name it! We would love to hear from you! Contact Camille Isaacs-Morell cisaacsmorell@videotron.ca to have your article published in the next edition of The Anchor.
  34. 34. 865 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 • (514) 631-3601 • allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 34 A note from the editor Dear friends, Summer is here! Aren’t we happy for the freedom that warmer weather gives us? As pandemic restrictions are reduced, we now can meet in greater numbers and in more spaces. The signs of renewed fellowship are all around us. Emerging from the restrictions of the pandemic, we now find ourselves embracing diverse ways of being and doing. We are now more aware of the need to be our neighbour’s keeper. We have had to make decisions for the common good. Braving the jab of a vaccination protects us and others from the horrendous Corona virus. Delving deeply into the issues that affect ‘other people,’ we’re beginning to better understand systemic racism and the injustice that religion has inflicted on our First Nations brothers and sisters. We’re also understanding more clearly that doing church is much more than the regular Sunday morning Eucharist service and coffee hour. We have found new and creative ways to fellowship. Whether by Zoom on weekday evenings, in a park or in a homeless mission. The past 16 months have afforded us the opportunity to reflect, regroup and reset. We now know that there are diverse ways of doing and being and they are all valid. This edition of The Anchor takes a look at the diverse ways in which we are worshiping, living our faith and serving. Some of our members have transitioned from time to eternity and we have a lot to learn from their legacies. There’s a long road ahead of us as we apply the learnings from the pandemic lockdown. The good news is that we’re all in this together! Yours in His service, Camille Camille Isaacs-Morell cisaacsmorell@videotron.ca The Anglican Parish of All Saints by the Lake 865 Lakeshore Drive Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 (514) 631-3601 allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com www.pramchurch.org Facebook: Anglican Church of All Saints by the Lake Incumbent The Reverend Grace Burson gburson@montreal.anglican.ca 438-334-0610 Organist and Choir Director Chris Grocholski chris_grocholski@yahoo.ca Lay Readers Bob McLachlan, Yvonne Wakeland, Mark Weatherley Yvonne Bayne Rector’s Warden Raymond Noël raymond.noel1@outlook.com 514-697-7636 People’s Warden Yvonne Bayne ybayne84@gmail.com 438-969-2046 Parish Administrator Jennifer Gibb allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 514-631-3601 Summer Office Hours: 9:30am - 3:30pm Tuesdays, Thursdays & Fridays

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