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YOUNG PEOPLE, MEDIA MAKING
& CRITICAL DIGITAL
CITIZENSHIP
Professor David McGillivray
@dgmcgillivray
Jennifer Jones
@jenni...
ABOUT ME:
• Educator & Researcher. Education, social media, digital storytelling, major
events & citizen journalism. Digit...
CONTEXT
• Building on some recent projects:
• #citizenrelay and Digital Commonwealth
• Intrigued by how schools deal with ...
AFFORDANCES OF DIGITAL & SOCIAL
MEDIA (BOYD, 2014)
• Persistence: durability on online expressions and content
• Visibilit...
• Social media empowers people as ‘creators’ rather than just ‘consumers’ – the prosumer (Ritzer & Jurgenson,
2010)
• Soci...
DIGITAL AND SOCIAL MEDIA AND
SCHOOLS (1)
• Newer platforms can help people learn about things that they want to learn abou...
DIGITAL AND SOCIAL MEDIA AND
SCHOOLS (2)
• Legitimate concerns over risk, privacy, rights
• Worries over skills and compet...
• Creative response to the Commonwealth (Games) from across
Scotland, involving diverse range of individuals/communities
•...
SCHOOLS
PROGRAMME
• 57 schools, 23 out of 32 local authorities, 585 participated
• transition initiatives (primary & secon...
PRINCIPLES
• ‘common-weal’
• Common (s) purpose –
ownership
• Collaboration
• Sharing
• Accessibility
• Archiving
OPEN RESOURCES
• Provided a ‘framework’ for expert
practitioners to work w/ schools
on:
• Blogging
• Audio
• Video
• Socia...
WHAT WORKED
• Collaborative blogs between
trainers, teachers and learners.
• Connections between
participants across Scotl...
WHAT WORKED
• International links were created
and sustained
• Transition and cluster projects
helped join schools
• Use o...
CHALLENGES
• Securing access to local authorities through
gatekeepers
• Lack of available equipment, software
and function...
CRITICAL LESSONS
• Communicating
expectations;
• Technology;
• Flexibility;
• Relationships;
• Empowerment (through
demyst...
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS
• Through the Digital Commonwealth project (and then later the research) it was clear that there was a...
FURTHER RESEARCH
levels of digital competence in children and teenagers remain inadequate, especially on the dimensions of...
YOUNG PEOPLE, MEDIA MAKING
& CRITICAL DIGITAL
CITIZENSHIP
Professor David McGillivray
@dgmcgillivray
Jennifer Jones
@jenni...
Young people, media making and critical digital citizenship #CCStrath16
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Young people, media making and critical digital citizenship #CCStrath16

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Slides (developed by Prof. David McGillivray) for presentation on paper (presented as co-author) at Contemporary Childhood Conference, Strathclyde University - Glasgow 3rd of September, 2016: Original paper available here: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/eqPvfgZpcjxcMZf9KfwB/full

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Young people, media making and critical digital citizenship #CCStrath16

  1. 1. YOUNG PEOPLE, MEDIA MAKING & CRITICAL DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP Professor David McGillivray @dgmcgillivray Jennifer Jones @jennifermjones #CCStrath16
  2. 2. ABOUT ME: • Educator & Researcher. Education, social media, digital storytelling, major events & citizen journalism. Digital Media Tutor. Previous: Digital Commonwealth Project Coordinator. PT PhD. Greyhounds.
  3. 3. CONTEXT • Building on some recent projects: • #citizenrelay and Digital Commonwealth • Intrigued by how schools deal with the 'affordances' of digital and social media - inside and outside the school gates • Interested in what the ‘digital’ means to learners, teachers and parents and whether access and use are unevenly experienced according to economic, social and cultural variables • Interested in how eventification (Jakob, 2013) might be used to accelerate digital developments in schools and embed a critical consideration of digital literacies
  4. 4. AFFORDANCES OF DIGITAL & SOCIAL MEDIA (BOYD, 2014) • Persistence: durability on online expressions and content • Visibility: the potential audience who can bear witness • Spreadability: the ease with which content can be shared • Searchability: the ability to find information • Young people view social media usage as a ‘cultural mindset’
  5. 5. • Social media empowers people as ‘creators’ rather than just ‘consumers’ – the prosumer (Ritzer & Jurgenson, 2010) • Social media can decentralize, empower, mobil(e)ise (Hands, 2011) and organize (Rheingold, 2002) • Social media enables challenge to established sources of knowledge & authority • Social media provides the “hope - that we are seeing a shift away from a 'sit back and be told' culture towards more of a 'making and doing' culture” (Gauntlett, 2011: 8) BUT • Social media is not collectively owned or without bias – it’s infused with corporate logic (Gauntlett, 2011: Fuchs, 2014) • Social media depends upon the freely given time of millions of people and access to its benefits is not equally shared • Social media has been appropriated as a tool for marketing and promotion – as a tool to extend consumer capitalism ‘Ultimately, from a capitalist point of view, Web 2.0 is all about sites creating ‘competitive advantages’ vis-à-vis other sites. Those that succeed (e.g. Google) will be among the titans of what might be a new form of capitalism’ (Ritzer & Jurgenson, 2010, p30) CRITICAL DIGITAL PERSPECTIVES
  6. 6. DIGITAL AND SOCIAL MEDIA AND SCHOOLS (1) • Newer platforms can help people learn about things that they want to learn about, when they want to do so – rather than having to be somewhere at a predetermined time • Learning ‘chosen’, pursued as part of learning webs of individuals and groups • Horizon Report Europe: 2014 Schools Edition (Johnson et al 2014) found two major imminent trends: • the changing role of schoolteachers as a result of ICT influence, and • the impact of social media platforms, such as Facebook and Twitter, which are already finding their way into classrooms • Educators are using social networks as professional communities of practice, as learning communities, and as a platform to share interesting stories about topics students are studying in class (#ScotEdChat?) • There “remains considerable room for leadership, especially in documenting creative social media projects that demonstrate the benefits of social media for education” (Johnson et al, 2014: 11) It is becoming increasingly clear to schools that mobility is a key feature of the digital age, and one that will shape the future of education. (Johnson et al, 2014: 44)
  7. 7. DIGITAL AND SOCIAL MEDIA AND SCHOOLS (2) • Legitimate concerns over risk, privacy, rights • Worries over skills and competencies to cope and integrate • Issues around the availability of technological infrastructure necessary to facilitate creative digital making • Challenges of digital leadership within and outside of schools • Uncertainty over the influence of socio-economic factors on access to, and usage of, digital and social media: markers of class such as parents’ levels of education and occupation influence the habitus of young people, which in turn influences their digital tastes…the link between cultural capital, habitus and cultural form produces a socially entrenched digital inequality rather than an economically entrenched digital divide (Willig et al 2015: 5)
  8. 8. • Creative response to the Commonwealth (Games) from across Scotland, involving diverse range of individuals/communities • Community media clusters: • community media cafes and digital storytelling workshops • Schools programme: • in-school digital storytelling workshops with primary and secondary learners in Scotland’s 32 local authorities • Creative voices • documentary film, creative writing and community songwriting around UWS campuses CASE STUDY: DIGITAL COMMONWEALTH
  9. 9. SCHOOLS PROGRAMME • 57 schools, 23 out of 32 local authorities, 585 participated • transition initiatives (primary & secondary working together) • cascading skills (learners becoming digital leaders) • 'creative citizenship' responding to the themes of project – ‘place’, ‘people’, ‘culture’ & ‘exchange’ • developed a Digital Storytelling handbook (available free online here: http://bit.ly/digCW2014_HB)
  10. 10. PRINCIPLES • ‘common-weal’ • Common (s) purpose – ownership • Collaboration • Sharing • Accessibility • Archiving
  11. 11. OPEN RESOURCES • Provided a ‘framework’ for expert practitioners to work w/ schools on: • Blogging • Audio • Video • Social media
  12. 12. WHAT WORKED • Collaborative blogs between trainers, teachers and learners. • Connections between participants across Scotland. • Wider reporting through learning communities. • Project working with external partners and inter-generationally.
  13. 13. WHAT WORKED • International links were created and sustained • Transition and cluster projects helped join schools • Use of the #DigCW2014 to link and discuss on twitter • Continued use of skills post- DigCW2014
  14. 14. CHALLENGES • Securing access to local authorities through gatekeepers • Lack of available equipment, software and functioning IT infrastructure (in some authorities) • Blocked sites for staff and pupils at Local Authority level • Different engagement and teaching styles.
  15. 15. CRITICAL LESSONS • Communicating expectations; • Technology; • Flexibility; • Relationships; • Empowerment (through demystifying risk).
  16. 16. CONCLUDING THOUGHTS • Through the Digital Commonwealth project (and then later the research) it was clear that there was a demonstrable need for young people to be support the creation of media content, not just the consumption of it. Drawing on the experiences that they may have already, this can disrupt the existing institutional practices. • We have argued for the embedding of a critical digital citizenship agenda, where young people are, through practice, asked to ponder how digitally mediated publics operate and think carefully about matters of ownership, privacy, security and risk in the school setting and beyond. Integrating ‘making’ and ‘thinking critically’ about the benefits and dangers of pervasive digital media in and outside of school is imperative. • Our study suggests that there remain significant inequities in terms of provision across schools, access to suitable infrastructure and equipment, and the presence of qualified and confident staff with the requisite digital leadership attributes to enable digital media projects to be integrated into everyday learning practices. • Lastly, digital scholarship opens and melt boundaries of work, leisure and education. s the social Web creates the potential for simultaneous learning and leisure, both educational actors and young people have to adapt their pedagogical practices to deal with a collapsing of spatial and temporal boundaries of schooling and leisure.
  17. 17. FURTHER RESEARCH levels of digital competence in children and teenagers remain inadequate, especially on the dimensions of critical and participatory literacy, where students do not just read content, but also engage with it and actively create their own responses to it (Johnson et al, 2014: 26) 1. To what extent does the use of digital and social media develop meaningful participation with critical digital literacy and encourage more effective feedback, dialogue and interaction between learners, parents, teachers, and the institution? 2. What are the implications for time management, effective teaching and learning and workload for teachers, parents and learners themselves from an erosion of conventional boundaries between home and school facilitated by digital and social media platforms? 3. What policy, leadership, infrastructural and skills development needs arise from the integration of digital and social media into learning, extending learning activities beyond the traditional school day? 4. How can learners develop key critical thinking skills to become confident and responsible digital citizens with the necessary digital literacy competencies to contribute and create content and differentiate between sources of information, safe and risky online practices?
  18. 18. YOUNG PEOPLE, MEDIA MAKING & CRITICAL DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP Professor David McGillivray @dgmcgillivray Jennifer Jones @jennifermjones

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