Forms of argumentation

1,681 views

Published on

quick notes from pg.479-481 in The Prentice Hall Reader

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,681
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
50
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Forms of argumentation

  1. 1. Forms of ArgumentationA Few Quick Terms to Discuss with Pages 479-481 (The Prentice Hall Reader)
  2. 2. Inductive Reasoning Specific Evidence  Generalized Conclusion Focuses on examples “Hides” the thesis until the reader is involved. Works well for a thesis that may automatically be rejected by readers.
  3. 3. Deductive Reasoning Claim or Assumption  Evidence and Support Gives thesis early and then provides the support for that conclusion. Runs the risk of alienating readers. Use the introduction to engage readers.
  4. 4. Syllogism Simplest form of deductive argument. Asserts that a major premise/assumption is true. A minor premise/assumption is also true. This means that the logical conclusion is proven to be true. Example:  Major Premise = All people should have equal opportunities.  Minor Premise = Minorities are people.  Conclusion = Minorities should have equal opportunities.
  5. 5. Notes on Syllogisms Most arguments cannot be reduced to a syllogism. This is the most basic logic, and we rarely work that way. Although a syllogism may not be the framework for an argument, it can often be integral to the argument. Break down deductive arguments to look for a basic syllogism.
  6. 6. Endings END DECISIVELY! Call to Action Reinforce thesis Thought-provoking question Powerful image Final reminders

×