Visual Literacy Week 2 (of 6) Slides

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Visual Literacy Week 2 (of 6) Slides

  1. 1. Visual Literacy Marketing 320 - Week 2 Philadelphia University Spring II 2010 Craig A. DeLarge, MBA 1 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  2. 2. Week 2 Agenda Take Roll Review Key Week 1 Concepts •1) Visual Literacy; 2) Elements; 3) Contrast v. Harmony; 4) Markets & VizLit's effect on them Review Exercises (as workshop) Comment on Final Project Delivery, et al. Report out on Final Project Selections Week 2 Concepts to Cover • Fine v Applied Art from chapter 1 • Compositional Concepts from Chapter 1 2 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  3. 3. Take Roll 3 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  4. 4. Week 1 Concept Review 1) Visual Literacy 2) Elements 3) Contrast v. Harmony 4) Markets & VizLit's effect on them 4 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  5. 5. Marketing & Its Effect Marketing has 2 Chief Goals 1) to create markets where buys and sellers come together to execute transactions and hopefully develop relationships 2) effect changes in thinking (belief), feeling (emotion), & action (behavior) that leads to transactions, and hopefully, relationship & community (tribes) Visuals are a key tool of the marketer! 5 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  6. 6. Exercise Workshops Chapter 1 – Question #1 • Choose object with fine & applied art value • Evaluate its function, aesthetics, communications & decorative & entertainment value Chapter 2 – Question #3 • Choose an example of bad graphic design defined as difficult to read & understand • Analyze how ambiguity contributes to failure of communication • Resketch design to level of sharpen the effect 6 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  7. 7. Final Project Delivery Prepare final project in PowerPoint (even the research report) There is a 10 minute presentation limit Make generous use of course concepts & reference them. Make generous use of visuals Be sure to reference work You may use speaker notes to further annotate You may hold notes to speak from but do not read word for word when presenting 7 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  8. 8. So, What Is Your Final Project Going To Be? 8 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  9. 9. Week 2 Concept Discussion 9 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  10. 10. Fine v. Applied Art Fine art related to decoration & entertainment Applied art related to use, purpose & functionality, and is often distinguished as design (vs. art) Most objects serve both purposes There is an argument that this is a false dichotomy 10 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  11. 11. Is fine v. applied art a false dichotomy? Dondis, A Primer of Visual Literacy 11 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  12. 12. Are these functional art only? http://theboombox.files.wordpress.com/2007/10/mini-cooper-mosaic01.jpg http://images.businessweek.com/ss/08/07/0717_idea_winners/image/g_iphone.jpg 12 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  13. 13. Chapter 2: Composition Composition is most crucial step in visual problem solving Syntax is important to composition in that is is the orderly arrangement of parts to produce an intended whole Compositional decisions set the purpose & meaning of the visual statement Compositional rules are subjective & not absolute Dondis, A Primer of Visual Literacy 13 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  14. 14. Basic Communications Model Misunderstanding aided by noise. Verbal/Visual Intended Perceived Meaning Meaning created Intended & Perceived Meaning created here (hopefully) reconciled here. here http://records.viu.ca/~soules/media301/message.gif 14 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  15. 15. Perception & VizComm Perception is the application of meaning to composition Perception occurs via our 5 senses Seeing is the result of our visual sense Seeing is a response to light; i.e. tonality The VizLit Elements are the tools we use to create compositions which create perception (meaning) via light & seeing Dondis, A Primer of Visual Literacy 15 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  16. 16. VizLit Basic Elements • Dot • Color • Line • Texture • Shape • Scale/Proportion • Tone • Dimension • Motion • These are like the letters, words, & sentences in linguistic literacy. • Literacy requires the ability to use these elements to create meaning Dondis, A Primer of Visual Literacy 16 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  17. 17. What meaning lies in these compositions, representationally, symbolically & abstractly? http://theboombox.files.wordpress.com/2007/10/mini-cooper-mosaic01.jpg http://images.businessweek.com/ss/08/07/0717_idea_winners/image/g_iphone.jpg 17 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  18. 18. Comp. Decision: Balance v. Stress • This continuum is like harmony & contrast • The eye seeks balance along a horizontal & vertical axis for security……while craving stress to create interest & surprise 18 Dondis, A Primer of Visual Literacy © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  19. 19. Comp. Decision: Level v. Sharpen • Another dichotomy like harmony & contrast • Leveling is balanced • Sharpening is “intentionally” unbalanced • Both contribute to clear communication • Ambiguity is the absence of either & confuses 19 Dondis, A Primer of Visual Literacy © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  20. 20. Comp. Decision: Level v. Sharpen • How information is grouped in a composition impacts leveling & sharpening • Elements in areas of stress have more weight, or ability to attract the eye. XXXXXX X XX X XX X XX 20 Dondis, A Primer of Visual Literacy © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  21. 21. What is Gestalt? • positing that the operational principle of the brain is holistic, parallel, and analog, with self- organizing tendencies • Gestalt effect: form-forming capability of our senses & involves recognition of figures & whole forms instead of just collections of simple lines and curves. • Pertains to comp. decision of attraction & grouping http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gestalt_psychology © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  22. 22. Comp. Decision: Attraction & Grouping • Based on Gestalt Theory • The eye tends to group similar elements as well as to order elements for expected meaning Dondis, A Primer of Visual Literacy © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  23. 23. Comp. Decision: Positive & Negative • The positive is active & attracts the eye most • The negative is passive and in the background Dondis, A Primer of Visual Literacy © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  24. 24. This Week’s HW Focus • Read Chapters 3-4 • Read Chapters 5-6, if ambitious • Complete Chapter 3 & 4 exercises • Finalize and outline your final project 24 © 2010, Craig DeLarge

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