Visual literacy week 1 slides

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Visual literacy week 1 slides

  1. 1. Visual Literacy Marketing 320 – Week 1 Philadelphia University Spring II 2010 Craig A. DeLarge, MBA 1 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  2. 2. Week 1 Agenda • Self Introductions • Syllabus Review • Defining Visual Literacy • Why We Should Care • Elements & Vocabulary 2 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  3. 3. Self Introductions 3 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  4. 4. About Me • PhilaU Alumni, BS Marketing,1988 • University of Westminster, MBA Design Mgmt., 2003 • Marketing Professor – PhilaU, Chestnut Hill College, St. Joe’s, Drexel University • Career Coach – WiseWorking.com • Marketer - Novo Nordisk, GSK, J&J • Mental Health Advocate – NAMI • 21 years married with 2 (grown) children. ☺4 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  5. 5. Introduce Yourself • Name • Major, Year of Study • Occupation • Why Taking Course (other than need for credit)? • What You Need to Gain From Course? 5 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  6. 6. Syllabus Review 6 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  7. 7. What It Will Take To Do Well • Attention to detail in spelling & grammar • Clear & orderly expression of ideas & opinions • Research! And referencing of research • Participation in & between class • Demonstration of your learning • Courage – Action in Face of Fear (development) 7 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  8. 8. VizLit Questions • Who is intended audience? • What is intended message? • How is communications successful? • Why is communication successful? 8 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  9. 9. Visual Literacy: An Introduction 9 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  10. 10. Visual Literacy is… • The ability to evaluate, apply, or create conceptual visual representations. • Form of meaning making complementary to linguistic literacy Source: http://www.visual-literacy.org/index.html 10 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  11. 11. Why Should We Care About VizLit? • Aliteracy • The Democratization of Visuals • Communications: A Critical Success Factor • Critique your/other’s interpretations 11 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  12. 12. Aliteracy • The state of being able to read but being uninterested in doing so • Increasing the importance of transliteracy • Has some fearing a post-literate society http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aliteracy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transliteracy 12 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postliterate_society © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  13. 13. Why Should We Care About VizLit? • Aliteracy • The Democratization of Visuals • Communications: A Critical Success Factor • Critique your/other’s interpretations 13 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  14. 14. Democratization of Visuals • In the pre-camera days, visual production was largely an artistic craft • Cameras (photo & video) has empowered us ALL to produce visual content • But do we know how & what we are producing © 2010, Craig DeLarge 14
  15. 15. Why Should We Care About VizLit? • Aliteracy • The Democratization of Visuals • Communications: A Critical Success Factor • Critique your/other’s interpretations 15 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  16. 16. Communication is… • membership in a culture • leadership in a group • credibility with those we need influence • a general critical success skill & factor • judged successful by the audience thus you must understand how the audience perceives 16 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  17. 17. Why Should We Care About VizLit? • Aliteracy • The Democratization of Visuals • Communications: A Critical Success Factor • Critique your/other’s interpretations 17 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  18. 18. VizLit Applications & Examples 18 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  19. 19. Applications Marketing: corporate communications, newsletters, business cards, websites, video, etc. Stakeholder communications: presentation of data using charts, graphs, symbols Training: one learns better through multiple modes 19 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  20. 20. Searching for Visual Literacy 20 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  21. 21. Searching for Visual Literacy Do you know these people? 21 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  22. 22. Searching for Visual Literacy 22 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  23. 23. Searching for Visual Literacy • Lucas Teaching Communications • Iain Anderson: Symbols on a Trip • AT&T Across The Nation •http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8c_nrA_BUz4 23 •George Lucas: Teaching "Communication" © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  24. 24. VizLit Vocab: Elements & Levels of Expression 24 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  25. 25. Basic Communications Model Misunderstanding aided by noise. Verbal/Visual Intended Perceived Meaning Meaning created Intended & Perceived Meaning created here (hopefully) reconciled here. here http://records.viu.ca/~soules/media301/message.gif 25 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  26. 26. A goal of literacy studies is to close the gap between intended & perceived meaning. 26 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  27. 27. VizLit Basic Elements • Dot • Color • Line • Texture • Shape • Scale/Proportion • Tone • Dimension • Motion • These are like the letters, words, & sentences in linguistic literacy. • Literacy requires the ability to use these elements to create meaning 27 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  28. 28. VizLit Levels of Expression • Symbols • Representations • Abstractions 28 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  29. 29. The better you understand Visual Elements, the better you communicate & comprehend Visual input involves a myriad of symbol systems that we use to MAKE MEANING. Representational visual material can be recognized in the environment & can be replicated in drawing, painting, sculpture, and film Abstract understructure is the form of we see in representations which have an intended effect. 29 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  30. 30. Symbolic Elements with encoded, arbitrary meaning Meaning specific to target audience 30 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  31. 31. Representational What we see & recognize from environment & experience Realistic (photograph) Subjective (personal view) Form follows function 31 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  32. 32. Abstraction Symbolic, yet assumes its own meaning Simplistic, evokes more intense meaning Nike Swoosh logo represents the wing in the famous statue of the ‘How can this be called art? Greek Goddess of victory, Nike My child could have done this.’ http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/ 32 07/31/business/20080801-metrics- graphic.html?ref=business © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  33. 33. VizLit Continuum of Expression Contrast Harmony All visual • Instability • Balance communication • Asymmetry • Symmetry works on a • Irregularity • Regularity continuum • Complexity • Simplicity somewhere • Fragmentation • Unity between • Intricacy • Economy contrast & • Exaggeration • Understatement harmony. • Spontaneity • Predictability • Activeness • Stasis Contrast gets • Boldness • Subtlety our interest & • Accent • Neutrality stimulates us. • Transparency • Opacity • Variation • Consistency • Distortion • Accuracy Harmony give us rest & security. • Depth • Flatness • Juxtaposition • Singularity • Randomness • Sequentiality • Sharpness • Diffusion • Episodicity © 2010, Craig DeLarge • Repetition 33
  34. 34. VizLit Basic Elements 34 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  35. 35. VizLit Basic Elements • Dot • Color • Line • Texture • Shape • Scale/Proportion • Tone • Dimension • Motion • These are like the letters, words, & sentences in linguistic literacy. • Literacy requires the ability to use these elements to create meaning 35 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  36. 36. Dot ■ When placed in carefully designed patterns known as "halftones," dots suggest continuous and solid values and hues ■ Can add shading and texture in drawings, particularly line drawings Wall Street Journal Hedcuts 36 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  37. 37. The power of a Dot 37 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  38. 38. Lines are dots, end to end and in motion 38 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  39. 39. Lines can express abstractly or concretely 39 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  40. 40. Shape ■ The union of different lines ■ There are basically 3 shapes ■ squares ■ triangles ■ circles ■ Each has an inherent meaning 40 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  41. 41. Tone ■ Variance in the lightness or darkness of objects ■ Allows is to distinguish between this and that, even without color ■ Most critical for survival 41 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  42. 42. Color ■ Shapes perception ■ Affects emotion 42 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  43. 43. Texture Tactile texture is what we can feel with our sense of touch. Optical texture is what we make of visual texture in the images we see. 44 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  44. 44. Scale • How elements define one another • Communicates: – importance – relationship • Gives greater meaning to a basic image, lending it new life. • Creates the illusion of depth on a two-dimensional plane. – objects diminish in apparent size as they approach the horizon 45 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  45. 45. VizLit Questions • Who is intended audience? • What is intended message? • How is communications successful? • Why is communication successful? 46 © 2010, Craig DeLarge
  46. 46. This Week’s Focus • Read Chapters 1-2 • Read Chapters 3-4, if ambitious • Complete Chapter 1 & 2 exercises • Contemplate your final project choices 47 © 2010, Craig DeLarge

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