Fezeela Raza OEA Asian Discrimination in NZ

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  • Thank you
    Good afternoon
    V pleased to be part of this conference
    Heard a lot throughout this about the key challenges and initiatives happening in the refugee sector in terms of both local and international perspectives. And you have heard from the previous speakers about the government’s response to some of these key issues.
    What I would like to do today is contribute to this discussion by taking a wider lens which is consistent with the role of OEA.
    Diversity is one of the most compelling issues of our time.
    Globalisation, increased forced and voluntary migration have lead to increased ethnic diversity across the globe. This presents us with a number of challenges and opportunities.
    Today I would like to touch on how these factors are influencing NZ and the way we respond to diversity both at a government and societal level. I would also like to discuss what this means in terms of refugee communities and their contributions to NZ.
    Finally in looking forward I would like highlight key priority areas and to give examples of how OEA is and plans to address these.
    Good Morning Everyone
    As we know internationally, there has been an increasing backlash against multiculturalism which focuses particularly on the negative social and cultural and economic impacts of migration and ethnic diversity. However as you have heard throughout the course of this conference a new discourse is emerging which explores the benefits of diversity in particular the economic impacts of diversity and immigration both on the host community and the migrants populations. Clearly there is some very important empirical data emerging that is vital to us as policy makers.
    .
    This also reflects a move away from a purely based on a deficit model or human rights and equity framework for understanding ethnic communities and while these are valuable they may be limited and limiting.
    Today as you can see my presentation is about the benefits of diversity. I guess presentation from a government organisation such as the Office of ethnic Affairs as an implicit assumption that ideologically supports the idea that diversity is an asset to our country. However, it is essential certainly for an organisation such as ours to ensure that this philosophical underpinning does not inhibit robust dialogue and debate.
    Postsettlement end
  • <number>
    Cultural values, ethnic enclaves etc
  • <number>
    Multi-faceted reasons, but discrimination clearly a factor as
  •  
  • The challenge is to maximise the benefits and minimise the potential costs and negative social implications.
    Clearly, these are huge challenges, complex and multidimensional
    Begin by defining what we think the benefits are.
    Diversity is a potential source of vitality, creativity and growth. At the same time, diversity can be a major source of conflict.
    Levin, B & J. Rittel (1994) Dealing with Diversity: Some Propositions from Canadian Education, Education Policy Analysis, Archives, 2(2),
    http:// epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v2u2.html
  • NZ – New Zealand
    Oz – Australia
    Sw – Sweden
    Sp – Spain
    NI – Netherlands
    Fr – France
    Lx – Luxembourg
    UK – United Kingdom
    Dn – Denmark
    Fn – Finland
    It – Italy
    Pt – Portugal
    Ir – Ireland
    Bl – Belgium
    Ge – Germany
    Aus – Austria
    Gr – Greece
    NZ context is quite different-one indicator
  • <number>
    Multifaceted causes
    Socail psych tells us
    Does not alone lead to discrimiantion
  • Maximising economic benefits
    New Zealand’s ethnic communities are part of a global network of entrepreneurs, business people, investors, and highly skilled workers. To maximise the talents, skills and connections of New Zealand’s ethnic communities, OEA acts as a conduit between New Zealand businesses and ethnic communities. OEA also provides connections between government agencies and ethnic community businesses, particularly with agencies that are involved in the regulatory aspects of business in New Zealand.
    The government has signalled that Asia is a particular focus for New Zealand’s future economic prosperity. New Zealand is the first country to sign a Free Trade Agreement with China, and has signed trade agreements with ASEAN countries, Malaysia, and Singapore. New Zealand is currently negotiating an agreement with India.
    OEA has held a number of forums (and will hold more in the coming year) to harness the benefits that these agreements bring to New Zealand’s economy. These forums provide New Zealand businesses (including those owned by ethnic New Zealanders) to connect with our off-shore markets, and with each other. The forums highlight the importance of knowing one’s market when doing business in another country, with another culture, and the benefits that ethnic New Zealanders can bring through their expertise and connections. OEA works with a number of agencies to realise this priority – including New Zealand Trade and Enterprise, the Ministry of Economic Development, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.
    Government responsiveness
    New Zealand is becoming increasingly diverse, and is likely to become more so in the coming decades. Government policies and services should cater for this increasing diversity. This can be achieved by government agencies adopting, at the planning stages, the best practice of incorporating an ethnic policy framework. The Office of Ethnic Affairs works toward ensuring that policies and services are responsive to the needs of New Zealand’s diverse communities. Greater responsiveness endears a sense of belonging to the country, and develops people’s identities as New Zealanders. Equality of access is an important part of building and maintaining a social harmonious society.
    The Office provides an ethnic policy framework for government departments to assist in policy planning, and to deliver training to impart practical tools and resources to develop greater responsiveness to ethnic communities.
    The Language Line telephone interpreting service is another example of the work OEA undertakes to ensure access to information and services to ethnic communities. Language Line is now used by 70 agencies, and provides services in 40 languages. OEA also provides expertise on interpreting services and standards – with work being undertaken to develop standards of interpreting in New Zealand so that people are assured of being provided with professional interpreting services.
    Maintaining social harmony
    New Zealand has a reputation as a safe and harmonious country. We are looked upon as a successful model for social harmony in such a diverse society. However, to continue to be a socially harmonious society we need to keep working on ensuring that people are able to participate, contribute, and feel that they belong to New Zealand society. We also need to celebrate our multi-ethnic and multi-faith society, and harness the benefits that diversity brings New Zealand.
    Encouraging ethnic communities to participate in the decision-making processes of New Zealand fosters a sense of belonging to the country. OEA holds forums on civic participation to give tools to ethnic communities on how to make submissions to select committees, standing for office (at local government or community boards), and the New Zealand electoral and parliamentary system. OEA also works towards building media literacy among ethnic communities, ethnic media and mainstream media. The media is one of the most powerful tools in reflecting and transforming society, so media literacy (how to use, create, and critique media) is an important form of civic participation and building a democratic society.
    New Zealand’s international reputation as a socially harmonious nation is further demonstrated through its commitment to the objectives of the United Nations Alliance of Civilisations. The objectives of the Alliance is to create understanding between countries, cultures, and faiths with the aim of countering radicalisation and extremism. New Zealand was one of the first countries to express its support for the Alliance, and to submit an action plan to meet them. New Zealand has recently submitted an update of its action plan. The Office of Ethnic Affairs is the ‘Focal Point’ for New Zealand, which means we coordinate the domestic activities that form our action plan. OEA works closely with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and with other agencies, to realise the objectives of the Alliance.
  • Impact of cultural differences: four areas where a behaviour does make a difference in our service deliver - if the behaviour:
    reduces productivity
    threatens legality
    is unsafe
    increases costs
    Intercultural Competence for IRD staff?
  • Last but certainly not least, we have recently set up a new team called the Intercultural Awareness Team.
    This team will have both a strategic and hands on role in providing expert intercultural advice, training and support to individuals and agencies. As we become more diverse it is vital that we learn how to appreciate different cultural values, behaviours and perspectives and to navigate our way through different cultural environments. It is all very well to tell people to be inclusive and to respect different cultures. However it is difficult to do this when you don’t know or understand what another communities cultural values are and how to communicate effectively with them. Employer eg .. employees that say yes, when they mean no! This work is vitally important to providing people with skills and competencies we all need to build a strong and cohesive society. You will be hearing more about this work very shortly.
    There are many more things that we could talk about. However, I hope my introduction has provided you with an insight into OEA’s work that enables you to join forces with us to creates a more inclusive, strong and vibrant multicultural New Zealand.
  • New Zealand is becoming increasingly diverse, and is likely to become more so in the coming decades. Government policies and services should cater for this increasing diversity. This can be achieved by government agencies adopting, at the planning stages, the best practice of incorporating an ethnic policy framework. The Office of Ethnic Affairs works toward ensuring that policies and services are responsive to the needs of New Zealand’s diverse communities. Greater responsiveness endears a sense of belonging to the country, and develops people’s identities as New Zealanders. Equality of access is an important part of building and maintaining a social harmonious society.
    The Office provides an ethnic policy framework for government departments to assist in policy planning, and to deliver training to impart practical tools and resources to develop greater responsiveness to ethnic communities.
    The Intercultural Awareness and Communication Programme is designed to enable participants to develop more awareness of their cultural characteristics, and those of others, so they can communicate more effectively across cultural boundaries. It focuses on using effective communication to build the kinds of relationships that will lead to effective workplace interaction.
    The Language Line telephone interpreting service is another example of the work OEA undertakes to ensure access to information and services to ethnic communities. Language Line is now used by 70 agencies, and provides services in 40 languages. OEA also provides expertise on interpreting services and standards – with work being undertaken to develop standards of interpreting in New Zealand so that people are assured of being provided with professional interpreting services.
    The Office engages with communities to increase their participation within New Zealand’s democratic processes, to act as a conduit to government agencies and services, and to build capacity for a self-sufficient ethnic sector.
    Riding the Wave
    For organisations to continue to deliver high quality services or products and to be more innovative and productive, they need to integrate diversity management into every facet of their business
    The how to, practical actions based on lit review, research and case studies
    Leadership & management
    Human Resources
    Recruitment & selection
    Employee empowernment
    Product & service design
    Evaluation & monitoring: return on investment
    Div mgtg strategy tp reduce costs and drive business growth
  • Maximising economic benefits
    New Zealand’s ethnic communities are part of a global network of entrepreneurs, business people, investors, and highly skilled workers. To maximise the talents, skills and connections of New Zealand’s ethnic communities, OEA acts as a conduit between New Zealand businesses and ethnic communities. OEA also provides connections between government agencies and ethnic community businesses, particularly with agencies that are involved in the regulatory aspects of business in New Zealand.
    The government has signalled that Asia is a particular focus for New Zealand’s future economic prosperity. New Zealand is the first country to sign a Free Trade Agreement with China, and has signed trade agreements with ASEAN countries, Malaysia, and Singapore. New Zealand is currently negotiating an agreement with India.
    OEA has held a number of forums (and will hold more in the coming year) to harness the benefits that these agreements bring to New Zealand’s economy. These forums provide New Zealand businesses (including those owned by ethnic New Zealanders) to connect with our off-shore markets, and with each other. The forums highlight the importance of knowing one’s market when doing business in another country, with another culture, and the benefits that ethnic New Zealanders can bring through their expertise and connections. OEA works with a number of agencies to realise this priority – including New Zealand Trade and Enterprise, the Ministry of Economic Development, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.
    Maximise the talents, skills and connections of ethnic people for economic growth
  • Research suggests that ethnic business people have limited information about the local business context (manying Ip) and that the seek to make [passive rather than active investments as a result.
    In a recent report by Paul Spoonley and Carina Meares also reiterated the frustrations and barriers that Chinese business entrepreneurs face INZ
    Therefore a key focus of our work has been to Building connections across mainstream and ethnic business communities and improve access to information.
  • Fezeela Raza OEA Asian Discrimination in NZ

    1. 1. Fezeela Raza Principal Advisor Office of Ethnic Affairs Panel Discussion Diversity Forum, 2010 Asian Peoples in New Zealand: Confident, Equal and Proud: and Discriminated Against?
    2. 2. 2 Findings: Experiences of Discrimination • Many New Zealanders believe that NZ’s relationship with Asia can be beneficial economically, however it may also bring unwanted changes to NZ • Asian New Zealanders experience more discrimination than other New Zealanders and the main areas relate to public harassment, employment & workplace • Chinese & Korean respondents had experienced the most discrimination by young people in public spaces
    3. 3. 3 Discrimination & Employment • Asian migrants have the highest levels of unemployment compared to other New Zealanders • Sri Lankan migrants reported that they believed that race, colour, accent and ethnic name all contributed to discrimination in employment • Research by the University of Auckland School Of Business show Asian migrants with foreign qualifications and ethnic names fared worst although NZ-born Asians also faced discrimination
    4. 4. 4 Impacts of Discrimination • Overall these experiences did not always affect Asian migrant’s quality of life or general perceptions of NZ • Older and new Chinese migrant communities demonstrate different integration strategies. • NZ needs migrants, however the benefits of migration are impacted by discrimination ie leads to poor health and well-being outcomes for migrants • Social cohesion can be promoted in a number of ways including equal employment outcomes
    5. 5. 5 CONTEXT: Latest projections Ethnicity 2001 2006 2026 European or other (including New Zealander) 79% 77% 69% Māori 14% 15% 17% Pacific 7% 7% 10% Asian 5% 10% 16% Census 2006
    6. 6. 6 Ratio of newcomers to host community OECD Factbook 2009 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 M exicoH ungaryFinland C zech R epublic S lovak R epublicP ortugal D enm arkFranceN orw ay U nited K ingdom N etherlands S pain O E C D averageB elgiumG erm anyS w eden U nited S tatesA ustriaIrelandC anada N ew Z ealandA ustralia S w itzerland Luxem bourg Foreign-born population as a percentage of total population, 2006
    7. 7. 7 North & South magazine, December 2006 Turban- wearing Sikh removed from Qantas flight, TV3, 16 March, 2007 Asian community Anti-crime march, Auckland, July 2008 Pressure points
    8. 8. 8 Responses around the world It is a good thing for any society to be made up of people from different races, religions and cultures 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 NZ Oz Sw Sp Nl Fr Lx UK Dn Fn It Pt Ir Bl Ge Aus Gr Countries PercentageAgreement Presentation by C Ward & A Masgoret (2004), Attitudes towards Immigrants, Immigration, and Immigration Policy in New Zealand
    9. 9. 9 Aetiology of Discrimination • Inter-Group Contact and Relations • Lack of Intercultural Knowledge/Competency • Social Policy Environment • Economic Drivers
    10. 10. 10 Tackling Discrimination Three pronged approach: • Legislation • Government and Societal Measures • Individual and Community
    11. 11. 11 OEA Approach • Intercultural Competency and Dialogue • Promoting the Benefits of Diversity • Building Community Capacity • Ethnic Responsiveness and Access to Services
    12. 12. 12 Priorities for the Office of Ethnic Affairs 1. Maximise the talents, skills and connections of ethnic people for economic growth 2. Empower ethnic communities through increased government responsiveness 3. Maintain New Zealand’s reputation as a model of social harmony
    13. 13. 13 Intercultural competence “Being interculturally competent or aware doesn’t mean knowing everything about every culture. It is, instead, respect for difference, eagerness to learn, and a willingness to accept that there are many ways of viewing the world” Brenda Rodriguez
    14. 14. 14 IAC Training and Dialogue • Focus on Government agencies • Range of organisations including NGOs • Train the Trainers • Authentic Dialogue Programme Educational Institutions • Visibility Initiatives
    15. 15. 15 Benefits of Diversity Advice on how to maximise the benefits that ethnic diversity brings to the workplace •Diversity Management Programme •Recruitment and retention •Riding the Wave Publication
    16. 16. 16 Changing Paradigms? Strengths Vs Deficit Models “New Zealand’s diversity is not just an inescapable reality-it is a lifeline to the world and can be a launch-pad for recovery. Embracing diversity is not just a luxury for the good times. Now, of all times New Zealand simply cannot afford to let its many talents go to waste.” Phillipe Legrain 2009 Parliamentary Speech
    17. 17. 17 Promoting Benefits of Diversity Platforms for diaspora ethnic communities to engage with mainstream businesses •ASEAN Business Leaders’ Forum •“Dancing with the dragon” Chinese Business Community Forum •Business Leaders’ India Forum •Trade & the Muslim world & Halal economy
    18. 18. 18 Community Capacity Building • Building Bridges Programme (nationally) • Employment and Economic Development Workshops • Health workshops • Access to Justice, Law & Order • Support for Ethnic Women’s Groups • Visibility Projects • Ethnic media training and mainstream media engagement
    19. 19. 19 Looking Forward • Intersectoral collaboration • Social Marketing campaigns • Authentic dialogue-youth • Host community awareness • Research

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