Modal Verbs1.18a

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Modal Verbs1.18a

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Modal Verbs1.18a

  1. 2. What are Modal Verbs? <ul><li>Can </li></ul><ul><li>Could </li></ul><ul><li>Be able to </li></ul><ul><li>May </li></ul><ul><li>Must </li></ul><ul><li>Have to </li></ul><ul><li>Should </li></ul><ul><li>Ought to </li></ul><ul><li>Will </li></ul><ul><li>Would </li></ul><ul><li>Shall </li></ul><ul><li>Do </li></ul><ul><li>Might </li></ul>
  2. 3. CAN <ul><li>We use “can” to say that someone has the ability or opportunity to do something: </li></ul><ul><li>e.g.1 Can you speak English fluently? </li></ul><ul><li>e.g.2 It’s nice tonight. We can go for a swim. </li></ul>
  3. 4. Could <ul><li>“ Could” is the past tense of can. It is also more polite. It is less sure. </li></ul><ul><li>e.g.1 Could you do me a favor? </li></ul><ul><li>e.g.2 I could swim 10 km continuously when I was young. </li></ul>
  4. 5. Be Able To <ul><li>“ Be able to” is possible instead of “can” </li></ul><ul><li>It is a more formal then “can” </li></ul><ul><li> e.g. It’s nice that he was able to pass so well in the Exam. </li></ul>
  5. 6. May, Might, Could <ul><li>“ May” and “Might” express the ideas that something is very impossible. We can use them for the present and the future. </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. There may/might be some tickets left. </li></ul><ul><li> (Perhaps there are some left.) </li></ul>
  6. 7. <ul><li>“ May” can be use as “can”, but it is more polite. </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. May I ask you a question? </li></ul><ul><li>“ Could” is used when something is possible. </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. It could be good fun. </li></ul><ul><li>(But not “It can be good fun”) </li></ul>
  7. 8. Must , Have To <ul><li>In the present we use “must” and “have to” to say that something is necessary. </li></ul><ul><li>e.g.1 You must be careful. </li></ul><ul><li>e.g.2 I have to work on Saturday mornings. </li></ul><ul><li>When referring to the past, we use only “had to”. </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. Danny had to go to work yesterday. </li></ul><ul><li>(But not “Danny must go to work yesterday”) </li></ul>
  8. 9. Will, Would <ul><li>We use “will” for prediction. </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. Mary has walked a long way. She will sleep well tonight. </li></ul><ul><li>We use “would” also for a prediction about a possible situation. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. How about going to LA next month? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li> That would be nice. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 10. Shall, Should <ul><li>Normally we use “shall” only with I and we. </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. I shall probably go to England for holidays. </li></ul><ul><li>We can use “should” to give advice or opinion. </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. You look tired. You should go to bed. </li></ul>
  10. 11. Should, Must <ul><li>“ should” is not as strong as “must” </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. You should apologise. </li></ul><ul><li>(It would be a good thing to do.) </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. You must apologise. </li></ul><ul><li>(You have no alternative.) </li></ul>
  11. 12. Prepared by: Chan Wing Yu Cheung Sik Chiu Lo Wing Yee Ng Po Ting Yu Ching Man

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