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Follow the yellow brick road: A Leadership Journey to the Emerald City

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Slides for 20-minute Spotlight Talk at the 2017 Society for Technical Communication International Summit Conference. The talk discussed the main characters in the Wizard of Oz, Dorothy Gale, Scarecrow, Tin Woodman, and Lion as Leadership Types based on Keirsey Temperament Theory.

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Follow the yellow brick road: A Leadership Journey to the Emerald City

  1. 1. #stc17 Follow the Yellow Brick Road A Leadership Journey to the Emerald City Ben Woelk
  2. 2. #stc17 Background  Leadership Journeys  Keirsey Temperament Theory and Leadership  Why choose the Wizard of Oz?
  3. 3. #stc17 The Setting  Not Kansas
  4. 4. #stc17 Our Four Main Characters
  5. 5. #stc17 https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/77/c1/14/77c1146a8a972131766942e5b8b54bae.jpg
  6. 6. #stc17 RESTART
  7. 7. #stc17 Our Four Main Characters
  8. 8. #stc17 Dorothy (Guardian)
  9. 9. #stc17  Dorothy was afraid she had lost her way home. “Toto,” she said to her little dog, “I don’t think we’re in Kansas anymore.” Though never really lost at all, Dorothy felt stranded and alone, and she wanted Oz to return her to the security of her Aunt and Uncle’s farm. “There’s no place like home,” she said. Keirsey, Please Understand Me II, chapter 2
  10. 10. #stc17
  11. 11. #stc17  Scarecrow thought he had no brain. Although the most ingenious of the four, he consider himself witless and worthless, and he wanted Oz to make him smart. “Brains are the only things worth having in this world,” he said. Keirsey, Please Understand Me II, chapter 2
  12. 12. #stc17
  13. 13. #stc17  Tin Woodman believed he had no heart. As tender and sensitive as he was, he felt stiffened with rust and unable to love, and he wanted Oz to help him feel a warm, loving heart beating in his chest. “No one can love who has no heart,” he said. Keirsey, Please Understand Me II, chapter 2
  14. 14. #stc17 Lion (Artisan)
  15. 15. #stc17  Lion was lacking courage. Although a powerful, magnificent beast, he had grown cowardly and lost his self-respect, and he wanted the Wizard to give him back his nerve. “As long as I know myself to be a coward I should be unhappy,” he said. Keirsey, Please Understand Me II, chapter 2
  16. 16. #stc17 Leadership Lessons
  17. 17. #stc17 An Invitaton  Please join us on our Introverted Leadership Slack team. We provide an opportunity for introverts (and select others) to share on issues that affect us and to discuss introverted leadership. The Slack team is at https://introvertedleadership.slack.com/. Contact me at ben@benwoelk.com for more information.  Connect with me on social media and become a fan of the Introverted Leadership Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/introvertedleadership/
  18. 18. #stc17 Resources  Baum, L. Frank. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (Chicago, IL: George M. Hill Company), 1900.  Fleming, Victor, Director. The Wizard of Oz (Loew’s Inc. Hollywood, CA), 1939.  Keirsey, David. Please Understand Me II ((Delmar, CA: Prometheus Nemesis Book Company), 1998.  Myers, Isabel Briggs. Gifts Differing. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press, 1980.  Woelk, Ben. Follow the Yellow Brick Road: A Leadership Journey to the Emerald City (Proceedings, STC Summit Conference, 2017)  Woelk, Ben. An Introvert’s Journey to Leadership (Proceedings, STC Summit Conference, 2016).  Woelk, Ben. Guest Editor. Intercom: Personality, Temperament, and Technical Communication, Vol. 64, #2 February 2017  All photos were taken by Ben Woelk at the All Things Oz Museum, Chittenango, New York, http://www.allthingsoz.org/

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