Literacy Activities For Families with Young Children

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Presentation for LA DoE Early Head Start Professionals October, 2011.

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  • Parents, teachers and caregivers strongly influence the foundation for moral development in the very early years of a child's life.
  • Over 5000 resource kits provided free to volunteers Over 7800 volunteers trained/using resources Over 97,000 preschool children heard character themed stories from volunteers Over 99,000 parents of preschoolers received storybooks with character theme Educational website developed
  • 100 % of 197 teachers learned activities to help with their student’s emotional and social development and to teach character concepts to their students 99 % of 197 teachers indicated they will conduct character activities for their students Vast majority of teachers are using the resources in their classrooms with their students
  • 87% of 675 childcare providers reported they learned to teach the concepts of character 99 % of 342 parents stated they learned activities that will help with their child’s’ development 93 % of 340 parents reported they will teach the 6 traits of character to their children
  • Literacy Activities For Families with Young Children

    1. 1. LITERACY ACTIVITIES FOR FAMILIES WITH YOUNG CHILDREN A Training for Even Start Program Professionals September 30, 2011 Louisiana Department of Education
    2. 2. BROUGHT TO YOU TODAY BY:Rebecca E. White, Ph.D.Professor and Extension SpecialistFamily and Child DevelopmentCooperative Extension ServiceLSU AgCenter
    3. 3. WHO’S HERE TODAY ? INTRODUCTIONS
    4. 4. TOPIC FOR TODAY: FAMILY LITERACY AND RESOURCES FOR EVEN START PROFESSIONALS• Family Literacy• Character Critters• Family Storyteller• Let’s Read Together
    5. 5. PREVENTING THE30 MILLION WORD CATASTROPHE Family Literacy Programs
    6. 6. MY INSPIRATION• Tough, P. (2008). Whatever It Takes. NY: Houghton Mifflin Co.• Hart, B. & Risley, T.R. (2003). The early catastrophe: The 30 million word gap by age 3. American Educator, Spring 2003.• Hart, B. & Risley, T.R. (1995). Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Lives of Young American Children. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.• Hart, B. & Risley, T.R. (1999). The Social World of Children Learning to Talk. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
    7. 7. DAILY VERBAL INTERACTIONS MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT• The average three-year-old has heard 20 million words• Three year olds from very talkative, socially interactive families have heard 35 million words• Three year olds of uncommunicative families have heard less than 10 million words
    8. 8. THE 30 MILLION WORD GAP tiEstimated Cumulative Words Addressed to Child mated Cumulative Words Addressed to Child Estimated Cumulative Words Addressed to Child Professional 45 Million Words (In Millions) (In Millions) (In Millions) Working-class 26 Million Words Welfare 13 Million Words 12 24 36 48 (Age Child in Months)Hart, B. & Risley, T. R. (1995) Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experience of Young American Children
    9. 9. PARENT TALK• Hart, B. & Risley, T. R. (1995). Meaningful differences in the everyday lives of young children.
    10. 10. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS• “Any program to provide welfare children with experience equal to that of working class children would have to start from birth and run continuously all year long.” (Meaningful differences…, p. 202.)• “Helping parents is an alternative worth trying. Rather than design or expand early intervention programs, this country could focus on helping parents ensure that their children get enough early experience so that differences never become so intractable to even the most effective intervention.” (Meaningful Differences…, p. 212.)
    11. 11. FAMILY LITERACY• Parents and books are important – for our world…… for our children…… for our families…… for our schools…… for our communities…… for our society.
    12. 12. FAMILY LITERACY• Reading is a fundamental life skill• Reading is key to living a successful, productive life.• Our society relies on parents as the first and most important teacher in their child’s life to develop the foundation for literacy for their child.• A love for reading must be fostered in first three years of a child’s life by their parents to develop their foundation for literacy.
    13. 13. FAMILY LITERACY• Family literacy programs targeting families with very young children can help our society, our families and most importantly, our children.• Research supports the notion that if you wish to significantly improve life for children you involve their parents.
    14. 14. FAMILY LITERACY • Research indicates that the single most important activity for building the understandings and skills essential for reading success appears to be reading aloud to children.
    15. 15. TWO OF MY PROGRAMSINSPIRED BY THIS KNOWLEDGE
    16. 16. SHARE YOUR SUCCESS
    17. 17. SO I COMMEND YOU AND YOUR WORK
    18. 18. LET’S REVIEW THREE RESOURCES• Character Critters• Family Storyteller• Let’s Read Together
    19. 19. CHARACTER CRITTERS A character education program forpreschool children and their parents
    20. 20. WHY EARLY CHARACTER EDUCATION FOR PRESCHOOL ?Character educationhas been identified as a key need for children
    21. 21. WHY EARLY CHARACTER EDUCATION FOR PRESCHOOL AGE CHILDREN?Research show the foundationfor moral development isstrongly influenced in the veryearly years of a childs life byparents, early teachers andcaregivers.
    22. 22. PROGRAM OVERVIEW • Developed for pre-school children and their parents • Designed to be implemented by volunteers • Comprehensive in design with 5 components
    23. 23. PROGRAM COMPONENTS• Children’s stories about character• Parent-child interaction take-home sheets• Educational presentations for parents• Storybooks• Program evaluation
    24. 24. LOUISIANA VISION FOR CHARACTER CRITTERSFor all Louisiana 4 and 5 year olds to hearthe Character Critters stories fromteachers, volunteers and/or their parents
    25. 25. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES• Increase children’s awareness of character concepts• Increase parents’ understanding of character concepts• Increase parents’ involvement in developing their children’s character• Teachers, volunteer storytellers, and parents’ to tell/read character stories to young children• Increase volunteerism in communities
    26. 26. CHARACTER CRITTERS PROGRAM IMPACTS • Thousands of free resource kits to teachers • Thousands of teachers and volunteers trained • Educational Website developed • Over 150,000 parents of young children reached with storybooks • Hundreds of thousands of young children have heard Character Critters stories
    27. 27. CHARACTER CRITTERS PROGRAM IMPACTS - TEACHERS• Learned activities to help with students’ development• Learned to teach character concepts to their students• Are conducting character activities for their students
    28. 28. CHARACTER CRITTERS PROGRAM IMPACTS - CAREGIVERS AND PARENTS• Childcare providers learned to teach concepts of character• Parents learned activities to help with their child’s’ development• Parents indicated they will teach the traits of character
    29. 29. CHARACTER CRITTERS MATERIALS • Volunteer resource kits have been developed by some faculty to include puppets and other teaching supplies
    30. 30. CHARACTER CRITTERS WEBSITE• Go to http://www.lsuagcenter.com• Click on ‘Family and Home’ topic• In Family section, click on ‘Character Development’• On right side of screen under ‘sub-topics’ click on ‘Character Critters’
    31. 31. VOLUNTEERSGETTING MATERIALS READY
    32. 32. CRITTER STORYTELLING VOLUNTEERS
    33. 33. HEARING THE CRITTER STORIES
    34. 34. HEARING THE CRITTERS STORIES
    35. 35. Bunny Hop Activity
    36. 36. LEARNING TO PLANT A TREE LIKE CARRIE THE CARING CAT
    37. 37. Kindergarten students hoppin’ round like Fran and Freddie the Fair Frogs.
    38. 38. CRITTERS IN THE CLASSROOM
    39. 39. MORE CRITTERS IN THE CLASSROOM
    40. 40. Kindergarten students learning about fairness
    41. 41. Kindergarten students talking about fairness
    42. 42. PARENTS TELLING STORIES TO THEIR CHILDREN
    43. 43. LET’S READ TOGETHERAn Early Literacy Curriculum from the University of California Cooperative Extension
    44. 44. RESEARCH GUIDING DEVELOPMENT OF LET’S READ TOGETHERResearch on Delivery Research on Content• Start early • How to read aloud with children (Whitehurst & Lonigan, 2001)• Target efforts • How to extend the storybook• Be comprehensive (Richgels & Wold, 1995)• Intensive interventions • How to tell and use family stories (Buchoff, 1995)• Use highly trained professionals • How to encourage language skills• Provide compensatory learning (Jordon, Snow & Porsche, 2000)• Hold programs accountableSource: Susan Neuman, presentation at IRA 2005 Conference
    45. 45. LET’S READ TOGETHER OVERVIEW• Organized around a series of workshops for parents with children 0-5 years of age• Each workshop is organized around a featured book, selected for specific age group• Each workshop features hands-on, interactive activities for parents to learn skills• Comes in English and Spanish• Features Preschooler Series, Toddler Series and Infant Series
    46. 46. PROGRAM GOALS• Let’s Read Together is an early literacy program that helps parents of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers prepare their children for successful lifelong learning.
    47. 47. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES PARENTS WILL…• Learn about their important role in their child’s early literacy development and later school success.• Learn how to interact with their children in ways that promote enjoyment, self confidence and a joy of learning.• Understand the importance of early literacy and the skills and knowledge their children need to be successful learners.• Learn effective read aloud techniques and use them to read everyday to their child.• Learn to use simple strategies and activities to enhance early literacy development.
    48. 48. LET’S READ TOGETHER WORKSHOP SERIESPreschooler Series Toddler Series• Alphabet Fiesta • Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What• Do You See? Frog On His Own • Goodnight Moon• Is Your Mama a Llama? • Growing Vegetable Soup• The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry and the Big Hungry • Numbers/Los Numeros Bear • That’s Not My dinosaur• Rosie’s Walk • Where’s Spot• The Very Hungary Caterpillar
    49. 49. LET’S READ TOGETHER WORKSHOP SERIESInfant Series• Animals to Count• Baby Born• My Colors / Mis Colores• My First Real Mother Goose• Read To Your Bunny
    50. 50. LET’S READ TOGETHER WORKSHOP AT A GLANCE• Welcome• Introductory Activity – Animal Charades• Book Talk – summary, type, author info• Reading Aloud – Is Your Mama a Llama?, discussion• Retelling the Story – What Does Your Mama Look Like?• Literacy Theme – Ready to Read• More Activities – Rhyming Word Game, Where do animals live?, Fruit and Vegetable Animals Recipe• Family Activity Booklet• Closing and Evaluation
    51. 51. LET’S READ TOGETHER• Let’s look at the resources.
    52. 52. FAMILYSTORYTELLER A family literacy program from theUniversity of Nevada Cooperative Extension KNPB, Channel 5 Washoe County Library Washoe County School District
    53. 53. MAJOR FEATURES• Children’s literature• Instructional video tapes (VHS)• Flexible format (workshop, one-to-one, or home visitation)• Parent-child involvement with related activities• Designed for parents with limited literacy skills• Designed for parents and preschool children ages 2 ½ - 6 years• Emphasizes and models carefully selected book reading techniques
    54. 54. FAMILY STORYTELLERFamily storyteller introduces families to the joy ofliterature and language, showing parents techniquesfor how to read with their children, providing time topractice those skills and providing books and otherlanguage activities for use at home.
    55. 55. FAMILY STORYTELLER MANUAL• Introductory material and suggestions for trainer• Planning guides• Detailed lesson plans for parent educator with handout masters, instructions for parent packets and forms for program evaluation
    56. 56. FAMILY STORYTELLER GOALS • To enrich parent/child interaction and the home environment to enhance the language and lifelong learning skills of both parent and child.
    57. 57. FAMILY STORYTELLER …… CAN HELP PARENTS CAN HELP CHILDREN• Help their children do better • Increase their language skills in school • Come to love reading and writing• Watch their children grow in • Learn about their world through independence carefully selected books• Get a special private time • Do better at school with their children • Feel closer with parents• Have fun and enjoy the stories • Have fun and enjoy the stories
    58. 58. FAMILY STORYTELLER GOALSFEATURED BOOKS• Goodnight Moon• The Very Hungry Caterpillar• Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?• Peter’s Chair• The Wheels On The Bus• Have You Seen My Duckling?
    59. 59. FAMILY STORYTELLER• Let’s look at the resources.
    60. 60. HOW YOU CAN HELP!• Take provided Character Critters resources and develop your customized support materials• Use the Character Critters resources, your enhancement materials and ideas with your parents and children• Showcase parent-child activity sheets in child’s classroom
    61. 61. WEBSITE: WWW.LSUAGCENTER.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: REBECCA WHITE, PH.D.EMAIL: BWHITE@AGCENTER.LSU.EDU PHONE: (225) 578-3921

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