Unit 3 corporate citizenship

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Unit 3 corporate citizenship

  1. 1. Analytical Rea Unit 3: Corporate Citizenship : From Enslavement to Freedom, a Productive Life-long Learner Unit 3: Corporate Citizenship What is meant by corporate ciOzenship in a global economy? In Asia, the United States, and the 27 naOons of the European Union, is that concept real or imagined? Pretend that you are a consultant to a Fortune 500 Company. Begin your presentaOon by reviewing MIT professor Richard M. Locke’s “A Note on Corporate CiOzenship in a Global Society.” CriOque his alternaOve models of corporate ciOzenship. Now, reverse roles and pretend that you are a holder of annuiOes in a Fortune 500 company. Is your response to Locke’ arOcle the same or is it different? What are situaOonal ethics? What is crucial for pre‐professional students—future pracOOoners—to learn about corporate ciOzenship and ethical decision making? Share your essay with a faculty mentor. Aherwards, examine the essay and think about the evidence and the arguments. Are they aligned? Pod cast your answer. Listen to it and revise it. Upload it to the website for this course. Unit Descrip?on: The unit is developed to create an understanding of corporate ciOzenship from a global perspecOve. Students will be provided extensive informaOon on the concepts and will be able to apply analyOcal reasoning to provide soluOons using case studies. This unit will equip students with knowledge on current issues like Arizona, Mexico and Cuba and engage them in a thorough understanding of ethics, values and ciOzenship. Unit Narra?ve: GlobalizaOon has unified the world in terms of trade and commerce and has a far‐reaching impact on local economies through its funcOons. As a result of advanced communicaOon technologies of the day, globalizaOon has shrunk the world in size and has both posiOvely and negaOvely impacted local economies around the world. One of the major outcomes of globalizaOon was the growth of mulOnaOonal conglomerates (MNCs) in the eastern hemisphere. Many of these MNCs hail from the United States or Europe, but have reestablished their mass produc Oon units in Asian countries like China, India, Vietnam, Pakistan, Bangladesh, etc.
  2. 2. Due to globalizaOon, cheap labor has resulted in the drasOc price reducOon of commodi Oes and increased their availability. The uprooOng of the original work units in local American communiOes has resulted in destroying local economies, social structures, escalaOng crime rate, and increasing social and health dispariOes. The corpora Oons owe moral, social, and economic obligaOons to surrounding communiOes from which they draw their work force. Disregard for environmental protecOon in the race to making huge profits through massive producOon and heavy internaOonal trade has resulted in global warming, social upheaval, health dispariOes, urban challenges, etc. 17 Segment 1: a. What is your conceptualizaOon of ciO‐ zenship? b. Write your definiOon of ciOzenship in a 250‐word essay to be completed in class and shared with the enOre group. c. Discuss your definiOon of ciOzenship and share your definiOons of ciOzenship with the class. d. CiOzenship as defined by the Merriam‐ Webster DicOonary or some other valid and reliable source. e. Discuss ciOzenship, its relaOon to naturalizaOon, and current immigraOon issues. Specifically, the instructors should facilitate a discussion of the immigraOon issues currently under discussion in the following states/countries: 1. Arizona 2. Mexico 3. Mississippi 4. Cuba f. Following the discussion of the issues surrounding ciOzenship, naturalizaOon, and immigraOon, students should be administered a paper‐pencil CiOzenship Test that will be scored in class aher everyone is finished taking the test. In addiOon or in lieu of the CiOzenship Test, the students can acOvely engage in an exercise by playing a game based on American ciOzenship, the Bill of Rights, the ConsOtuOon, or the United States government. g. There should be a discussion of test items in terms of the level of difficulty or ease of each item as well as the fairness of each item. h. Next, students should be shown the School House Rock video via YouTube concerning how a bill becomes a law. i. This video should lead to a discussion of the United States ConsOtuOon and the Bill of Rights. j. Students should be given a paper copy of the United States Bill of Rights, and if possible, these
  3. 3. Bills should be shown on an overhead projector for the enOre class to view and discuss in an open forum. k. At the end of the above discussion, the instructor should introduce the concept of corporate ciOzenship, which can be compared to or contrasted with domesOc ciOzenship. l. Before students leave for the day, the instructors can administer a pre‐test as the first component of the Student Learning Outcome Assessment. This same test will be administered as a post‐test at the end of Day 8 to serve as parOal compleOon of the Student Learning Outcome Assessment. Segment 2: a. Students will be asked to revisit the formal definiOon of domesOc ciOzenship, they should be prompted to provide an operaOonal definiOon of corporate ciOzenship, and the instructors should provide the class with a formal definiOon of corporate ciOzenship. b. Students should be reminded that corporaOons are comprised of individuals with rights that should be protected. Therefore, if the rights of the individuals within a corporaOon should be Reading: Locke, Richard, A Note on Corporate Ci0zenship in a Global Society 18 Unit Activities Class discussion - What is citizenship? A Note on Corporate Citizenship The Case of Nike & An Inconvenient Truth Your Fortune 500 protected, should the rights of the corporaOon be protected in the same manner under the same laws, that is? c. The instructors should facilitate a discussion of the term global economy, and the enOre class should engage in a discussion of corporate ciOzenship in a global economy. The students should be prompted to discuss the responsibiliOes of the corporaOon as well as the rights of the corpora Oon previously discussed. The rights and responsibiliOes of the corporaOon should be discussed in both a domesOc/naOonal and global context. Can corporaOons be viewed as transna‐ Oonal ciOzens so to speak as the Roma are viewed as transnaOonal people by some countries/ cultures/individuals? d. The instructor can facilitate a discussion of instances in which the rights and responsibiliOes of the corporaOon (e.g., corporate social responsibility) supersede, if ever, the rights of the individuals. e. Here, the instructor can probe the students’ knowledge of the disOncOon between laws, morals, and ethics to ensure that the students know the difference between theses terms. f. This provides the instructors an opportunity to engage the students in a discussion of the following
  4. 4. topics: 1. corporate ethics (Discussion QuesOon/WriOng Prompt: What are corporate ethics?) 2. global ethics (Discussion QuesOon/WriOng Prompt: What are global ethics?) 3. situaOonal ethics (Discussion QuesOon/WriOng Prompt: What are situaOonal ethics?) g. The discussion of the above topics should be followed by a presentaOon of the following case: “Santa Clara County v. South Pacific Railroad” h. This case should be discussed in conjuncOon with the “United States ConsOtuOon: Fourteenth Amendment‐Rights Guaranteed Privileges and ImmuniOes of CiOzenship, Due Process and Equal ProtecOon.” Students should be provided with a paper copy of this amendment. i. Following the aforemenOoned case presentaOon and group discussion, students will be given a copy of Richard M. Locke’s arOcle (“Note on Corporate CiOzenship in a Global Economy”). The instructors will introduce the arOcle as well as provide a brief synopsis of its content. j. Next, the students will be given a single‐page handout summarizing Locke’s alternaOve models of corporate ciOzenship (i.e., Minimalist, Philanthropic, Encompassing, and Social AcOvist). k. The students will be asked to criOque/analyze each model in an open forum in which the instructors would facilitate the in‐class discussion by asking students to pretend that they composed the Google corporaOon and view the “Google and China” issue from each of Locke’s alterna Ove models of corporate ciOzenship. 1. For example, if the class was the Google corporaOon and they conducted business based on the Minimalist model, how would Google handle the current issue with China? 2. On the other hand, if Google funcOoned from a Social AcOvist model, how would this corporaOon conduct business with and in China? 3. In Asia, the United States, and the 27 naOons of the European Union (EU), is the concept of corporate ciOzenship real or imagined? Here, the instructor can inform the students of the structure and funcOon of the EU and spend a liIle Ome discussing various responses to this quesOon with the class in an open forum. l. In addiOon, the students will be instructed to read Locke’s arOcle as a homework assignment, and they would be required to write a short review (3‐5 pages that does not include the reference page) that will be typed (double‐spaced in 12‐point font) and submiIed to the instructors the following class period. This wriOng assignment will be graded and/or scored and counted toward the final course grade for the semester. Moreover, the graded and/or scored wriOng assignment will be returned to the students in a Omely manner to facilitate the Fortune 500 roleplaying exercise recommended for Day 6 (see f and g under Day 6). 19 m. Aher reviewing Locke’s four models and using the Google and China issue to facilitate the students’
  5. 5. understanding of the applicaOon of each model in the operaOons of an actual business addressing a real and current issue, the students will be instructed to divide into groups so that they can develop a corporate idenOty or profile. Once the students are divided into groups that will serve as businesses, each group will be assigned one of Locke’s models from which to func‐ Oon as a corporaOon. [The instructor can divide the class into four groups with perhaps ten (10) students per group. The number of groups and the size of each group will depend on the enOre class size. However, there should be a minimum of four (4) groups so that each model is represented.] n. The students will be informed that they can choose the industry (clothing, music, gaming, weapons, newspaper, etc.) for their corporaOons as well as the following: 1. company name 2. company logo 3. product distribuOon 4. markeOng/adverOsing strategy 5. research and development 6. corporate members (CEO, CFO, Consultants, etc.) 7. corporate image/public percepOon o. Students will be instructed that they should work together as a team to develop a corporate idenOty/profile, and each corporaOon will have to present themselves to the class next period. The instructors should inform the students that this presentaOon would be brief. However, they should be told that each corporaOon would be required to conduct a final presentaOon (15‐20 minutes) at the end of this unit. Each corporaOon will be faced with a challenge that must be resolved using input from every member of the corporaOon. p. The instructors should prompt students to exchange contact informaOon such as telephone numbers and email addresses that each student feels comfortable with giving to the group members for the sole purpose of compleOng the group assignments and course work. q. The instructors should set aside Ome (e.g., 15‐30 minutes) each class period to discuss any issues concerning the wriOng assignments or group tasks and final presentaOons. Segment 3: a. Begin the class by answering any quesOons regarding the alternaOve model of corporate ciOzenship each group was assigned, each group’s corporate profile, etc. b. Give the groups a few minute to organize their brief presentaOons. c. Ask each group to introduce the corporaOon to the class. d. Offer the members of the class the opportunity to ask quesOons of each corporaOon. The instructors should ask quesOons as well if they have any. e. At this point, the instructors can either: 1. Present all the corporaOons with only one scenario (see webpage developed by Dr. Monica Flippin‐Wynn and Dr. Thomas Kersen) that each business will have to address from the perspecOve of the model that was assigned to them in the previous class period (on
  6. 6. Day 2). 2. Present each corporaOon with a separate dilemma that the business must face either stateside or abroad based on the corporaOon’s model of funcOoning as a business. Some corporaOons may be faced with ethical decision‐making in a global environment. a. For example, an American corporaOon in the clothing industry may be faced with the issue of corporate accountability, responsibility, codes of ethics, and sets of laws such as 20 child labor laws, inhumane working condiOons, and sweatshop scenarios abroad (in China or Italy, for example). b. If the instructors choose to present a corporaOon with the above example, it should be discussed in conjuncOon with the following case: “The Promise and Perils of Globaliza‐ Oon: The Case of Nike.” Other dilemmas can include the sell of weapons to mercenaries for the weapons industry; the issues surrounding freedom of speech and censorship for the music and newspaper industries; and the issue of ethical decision‐making and moral obligaOons to the customers of corporaOons in the gaming industry that provides a form of entertainment which is viewed by some as demoralizing due to the violent content of some video games and by others as addicOve because of the various categories of gaming that include off track besng, casino gambling, state loIeries/loIo, etc. Segment 4: a. Now that students have been divided into groups represenOng different corporaOons, assigned a business model, selected an industry, and presented a challenge in the form of a scenario or dilemma, the students can begin to prepare for the final presentaOons where each corporaOon will present to the class the method that was chosen to resolve the challenge they faced. b. To facilitate this process and provide the students with some guidance in the resoluOon of their corporate challenges, the instructors will show porOons of films that address issues with which some major corporaOons face in today’s society. c. For example, the Film Supersize Me which addresses the issue of the moral, ethical, and legal obligaOons of corporaOons to their customers, shareholders, etc. Segment 5: a. To facilitate this process and provide the students with some guidance in the resoluOon of their corporate challenges, the instructors will show porOons of films that address issues with which some major corporaOons face in today’s society. b. For example, the Film An Inconvenient Truth which addresses the issue of corporate responsibility, corporate accountability, and the environmental impact (e.g., global warming) as well as other social, cultural, poliOcal, etc., ramificaOons of the presence and implicaOons of the prac‐ Oces of certain corporaOons in the United States and around the globe. c. This segment also provides the instructors with the opportunity to engage the class in an open
  7. 7. and frank discussion about BriOsh Petroleum and the Gulfcoast Oil Spill scandal that might have a direct impact on some of the students and their families here in Mississippi and in Louisiana as well as other places. Segment 6: a. Here students can be offered the opportunity to meet with their groups at the beginning or at the end of class for approximately 30 minutes (more or less) so that the corporaOons can formalize/finalize the plans for their upcoming group presentaOons that will be conducted over the next two class periods. b. The instructors can answer any quesOons that the students might have about their presenta‐ Oons as well as arrange to reserve any needed audiovisual equipment (e.g., laptops, projectors, extension cords, etc.). c. Next, students can view a series of commercials adverOsements for various poliOcal campaigns. These include the following: 1. The Daisy Girl 2. Willie Horton 21 3. Swih Boat Veterans for Truth and John Kerry’s Military Service 4. Barack Obama and Wyclef Jean d. These poliOcal campaign adverOsements played on television or aired via video on demand should be discussed in conjuncOon with the case “CiOzens United v. Federal ElecOon Commission” and the recent United States Supreme Court decision holding that corporate funding of poliOcal broadcasts on candidate elecOons cannot be limited under the First Amendment. The instructors can facilitate a discussion of this ruling in relaOon to the rights and responsibiliOes of corporaOons in the context of corporate ciOzenship and in terms of corporaOons funding poliO‐ cal campaigns, backing certain candidates, and potenOally influencing the outcome of United States elecOons. e. Finally, students can prepare for their group presentaOons, engage in criOcal thinking drills, and take part in the following analyOcal exercise by role‐playing with their peers. The class should be divided into two groups. The first group will be the two corporaOons assigned the Minimalist and Philanthropic models, and the second group will be composed of the two corporaOons assigned the Encompassing and Social AcOvist models. f. The first group of students should be instructed to pretend that they are consultants to a Fortune 500 Company and they should be asked to do the following:
  8. 8. 1. Begin your presentaOon by reviewing MIT professor Richard M. Locke’s “A Note on Corporate CiOzenship in a Global Society.” 2. CriOque/analyze alternaOve models of corporate ciOzenship. g. Now, the second group of students should pretend that they are holders of annuiOes in a Fortune 500 company. 1. Is your response to Locke’s arOcle the same as the first group? 2. Is your response to Locke’s arOcle different from the first group? Segment 7: a. Group PresentaOons and Student Learning Outcome(s) Assessments/EvaluaOons b. Podcast the group presentaOon and answers to all in‐class wriOng assignments. c. Listen to the group presentaOon and answers to all in‐class assignments. d. Revise and edit your work. e. Upload your group’s presentaOon and all in‐class wriOng assignments to the website for this course. Segment 8: a. Group PresentaOons and Student Learning Outcome(s) Assessments/EvaluaOons b. Podcast the group presentaOon and answers to all in‐class wriOng assignments. c. Listen to the group presentaOon and answers to all in‐class assignments. d. Revise and edit your work. e. Upload your group’s presentaOon and all in‐class wriOng assignments to the website for this course. f. Complete post‐test for this course. g. A sample Student Learning Outcome Assessment Rubric and RaOng Scale that can be used to evaluate the quality of both the individual wriOng assignments and the group presentaOons is provided and conOnued on the following page.

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