Composition wilson

403 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
403
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Composition wilson

  1. 1. Extreme Close Up ECU Close Up CU Medium Close Up MCU Medium Shot MS Waist Shot WS Knee Shot KS Full Length Shot FLS Long Shot LS
  2. 2. Which is a better picture? Why?
  3. 3. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. http://www.imagecounts.com/images/thirds.gif Dividing the frame into thirds in order to find the natural points of focus. Placing the central points of interest in the intersections will make shots more visually interesting.
  4. 4. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. http://www.cofc.edu/hettinger/images/DaVinci_Last_Supper.jpg You can even see the Rule of Thirds incorporated in famous works of art.
  5. 5. The space between the top of the frame and the person in the frame. For most shots, you will want very little head room. You should always get your headroom from the tallest person in the shot, not the shortest. What would it look like if you got your headroom from the shortest person?
  6. 6. The space between the top of the frame and the person in the frame. For most shots, you will want very little head room. You should always get your headroom from the tallest person in the shot, not the shortest. What would it look like if you got your headroom from the shortest person? Nice shot of baby, but Daddy got his head cut off!
  7. 7. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. A profile is a picture that shows someone from the side, like the presidents on all our coins. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. However, these are “absolute profiles”…in other words we see only one half of their face. This is good for a quarter but not for video or film. We should always see both eyes when shooting a profile of one person.
  8. 8. This is a good profile MCU because we can see both of the subject’s eyes…or is there something else wrong here? Why doesn’t this look good?
  9. 9. Is the space between the side of the frame and the persons nose. Unlike headroom, you want MORE nose room than room behind the person. The rough equation is 2/3 in front, 1/3 behind.
  10. 10. Is the space between the side of the frame and the persons nose. Unlike headroom, you want MORE nose room than room behind the person. The rough equation is 2/3 in front, 1/3 behind. NOW we have a good profile MCU…not too much headroom, more room in front than behind, and we can see both eyes.
  11. 11. Is a shot at the beginning of a scene which “establishes” (sets up) where the scene takes place, who is there, and what they are doing. A waist shot is often a perfect establishing shot for a simple scene of dialogue between two people.
  12. 12. Or OTS is a shot of something (often a person)shot over the shoulder of a person. OTS are often employed as the Close Ups during a scene with dialogue. Notice the good headroom and noseroom of the woman who is the subject of the shot.
  13. 13. WS Monica and Tynan meet on the stairs outside his home. MONICA: Hello, Tynan. MCU Tynan TYNAN: Hello.Do you like my wolf shirt? MCU Monica M: Yes, it’s very nice. MCU T T: I love wolves! MCU M M: I know! Why don’t we go to the library to check out a book on wolves? WS M & T end conversation and exit left. T: Great! Let’s go! ES-CU-ES stands for “Establishing Shot, Close Ups, Establishing Shot. This storyboard is an example of a scene with dialogue using ES-CU-ES. All our scripted videos must have an ES-CU-ES scene with dialogue.
  14. 14. WS Monica and Tynan meet on the stairs outside his home. MONICA: Hello, Tynan. MCU Tynan TYNAN: Hello.Do you like my wolf shirt? MCU Monica M: Yes, it’s very nice. MCU T T: I love wolves! MCU M M: I know! Why don’t we go to the library to check out a book on wolves? WS M & T end conversation and exit left. T: Great! Let’s go! 180° 180° is a straight line. The line here is the line between the two people talking. The 180° rule says you should never cross that line. See if you can tell when the camera person “crossed the line” here and what the result was.
  15. 15. Is a close up or detail of the scene on the screen. An insert shot should always have motivation, or a reason to be included in the shot sequence. Here, we want to show the audience that the woman is not just listening to music on her ipod, but looking at some pictures.
  16. 16. Now it’s time for you to put these terms into action. Your production group will be making two scripted productions, both advertisements or PSA’s for Takoma Park Middle School. Both will have at least one scene of dialogue using the ES-CU-ES formula with at least 4 close ups and your second must contain an insert shot. Before you begin you must complete the entire preproduction process including Preproduction Brainstorming Sheet, scripting, storyboarding, and dividing your group into roles. Remember what you have learned about the 8 shots, the Rule of Thirds, Headroom, Profile Shots, Noseroom, ES-CU-ES, the 180 Degree Rule, and Insert Shots. Good luck! QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  17. 17. Reflection This presentation was made for the Engagement stage of the learning cycle. The students will be introduced to several key concepts and vocabulary terms and given visual examples. After several other exercises, including drawing sample storyboard frames, learning to operate the camera and other equipment, learning the correct format of a video script and storyboard, and reviewing the roles and responsibilities of production group members, students will illustrate mastery of the concepts by incorporating them into their video productions. Making this presentation reintroduced me to PowerPoint, a tool I had used quite a bit six years ago but abandoned when I began teaching video production and media literacy. Instead, my students and I both worked with video. However, this project has helped me see that a non-animated visual presentation is quite powerful, especially when explaining visual concepts. In some of the instructional videos I have made, I fear the students get lost in “watching TV” mode and don’t quite focus enough on the content. With PowerPoint, I can show a still picture and talk about it without the distraction of the picture moving about and making noise. I will definitely use this presentation as an instructional tool and am already planning more. What is even better, I can turn them into video and store it on a DVD along with my other instructional videos and my future PowerPoints. This will make it easier to access and present while still benefiting from the still frame format.

×