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How to Write a Comparative EssayBuyessay

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How to Write a Comparative EssayBuyessay

  1. 1.  Perhaps you have been assigned a comparative essay in class, or need to write a comprehensive comparative report for work. In order to write a stellar comparative essay, you have to start off by picking two subjects that have enough similarities and differences to be compared in a meaningful way, such as two sports teams or two systems of government.  Once you have that, then you have to find at least two or three points of comparison and use research, facts, and well-organized paragraphs to impress and captivate your readers. Writing the comparative essay is an important skill that you will use many times throughout your scholastic career.
  2. 2.  You may have a great idea for a paper in your head, but if it doesn't perfectly match the prompt, you will lose points. Look over the prompt (and rubric, if you have one) carefully and underline key phrases. Keep a list of these things by you as you work.  What are the limits on your topic?  What specific things is the teacher hoping to see from your work?
  3. 3.  Although you want to have a thorough understanding of both things being compared, it’s important not to provide more details than the assignment can handle.  Compare a few aspects of each topic instead of trying to cover both topics comprehensively.
  4. 4.  No, really. Though you may have been taught to sit down and write your paper from start to finish, this is not only harder, but also more likely to make your thoughts disjointed. Try this instead: Body paragraphs first. Work through all that information you've been compiling and see what kind of story it tells you. Only when you've worked with your data will you know what the larger point of the paper is. Conclusion second. Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, the point of your essay should be fresh in your mind. Strike while the iron’s hot. Intro last. This is basically a reorganizing/rephrasing of your conclusion. Make sure you don’t reuse the exact same words/phrases.
  5. 5.  The first sentence of a body paragraph (often called the topic sentence) prepares the reader for what you’ll be covering in that paragraph, the middle of the paragraph presents the information you've gathered, and the last sentence draws a low-level conclusion based on that information.  Be careful not to overstep the bounds of the paragraph by making a much larger point about your two topics; that’s the job of the conclusion paragraph.
  6. 6.  When the essay’s done, the reader should feel like (s)he learned something and know that the essay is done, not be looking around for missing pages.  The conclusion should open by giving a brief, general summary of the points you covered in the body paragraphs, then draw a larger conclusion about your two subjects. (Be careful to base your conclusion in the data and not your personal preferences, especially if your essay prompt has instructed you to keep a neutral tone.)  The last sentence of the essay should leave the reader feeling that all the different threads of the essay have been drawn together in a cohesive way.

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