Archiving In Second Life Pics More Compressed

1,810 views

Published on

Presentation

Published in: Technology, Education
3 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • thanks for sharing your stream, really interesting......if you are interested in the link between art and second life, I suggest you to have a look at: http://www.koinup.com particolarly here:
    http://www.koinup.com/in-second-life/on-pictures/<br /><br/>
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Archiving in Second Life

    Abstract

    The virtual online world 'Second Life' provides a platform for 'residents' to create in a variety of media, with live musical performance high on the list of popular attractions. Sound effects including background nature sounds, character vocalisations and effects associated with animated objects add to the second life soundscape and strengthen the illusion of immersion in a virtual world. A wide range of streaming media is also available, either user created or sourced from existing internet streaming channels. Institutions, including universities and libraries, are experimenting with the use of Second Life as an alternative interface to web based resources. Library and Archive communities are represented in Second Life by special interest groups which are a diverse, international forum for investigation and discussion of the possibilities and challenges presented by Second Life and other similar platforms.
    The world of Second Life is evolving rapidly and is now four years old, with some users already showing interest in preserving the history and cultural artefacts of the Second Life community. This paper will discuss the authors encounters with the Second Life community, it's history, the activities of archivists working in Second Life, the potential use of Second Life for dissemination of archival resources, and the challenge of collecting and preserving the cultural artefacts of virtual worlds.
    A Personal Journey

    This paper is based on my own experience over the last 4 months as a Second Life resident and performer. My motivation for joining Second Life was a mixture of personal and professional curiosity, but I’ve been surprised by what an interesting chapter this has been in my own life, and speak mainly from the point of view of a individual who wants to preserve some record of a personal journey. Nevertheless my perspective as a Sound Curator of the National Film & Sound Archive naturally informs some of the discussion on Archiving in Second Life, and what I have experienced as a player will help inform what I expect to be a very limited approach to documenting this type of virtual performance.

    So over the next 15 minutes or so I’d like to share with you some of the artifacts that OhMy Kidd accumulated since his birth on 21st April 2007, and we’ll see what kind of story they tell about his journey.

    But first; what is Second Life?

    To quote the Second Life website “Second Life is a 3D digital world imagined, created and owned by its residents”. While ownership is tenuous, dependant as it is on the continued provision of real world computer power by the operators Linden Labs, it’s true that the residents of Second Life are free to imagine and create their own game. This feature set Second Life apart from other online games which generally have a fairly tightly defined scenario, where you are free to choose your role but the overall aims and objectives are pre-determined.

    Of Second Life’s 8 million registered users maybe half a million are regulars of who up to 40 thousand are online at the one time. Individually and collectively these users are creating a virtual culture that is in many ways a microcosm of the real world. It’s a culture with it’s own economy, where the equivalent of $US 1 million can change hand in a day. It’s a culture with it’s own media – press, radio, TV and movies. It’s a culture that values creativity, and one where live performance represents an important shared experience.

    The Grid

    The action takes place on a “game map” that is similar to many other computer simulations. The basic shape of the land is pre-determined by the developers, and the land is sold to players who can then re-form it to their own purposes.

    (map zoom in)

    Each four squares on the close up map represents four physical computer servers, with over 3,000 servers currently installed. Players can walk, drive, sail, fly or teleport to locations on the map to meet people, attend events or participate in other activities.

    (server shot)

    The Search Screen

    (event search slide)

    The search screen is like the Google of second life. This is how you find a concert or art gallery, a particular person, a special interest group, a class, a seminar, a shop or a yard sale.

    Communication

    You can chat to other players in the same area through a simple text interface. This is local but public chat, every nearby player sees all the text and can contribute to the discussion. The new voice feature on Second Life supplements this with an audio “party line” where all nearby players can speak and hear each other.

    (chat log with Yman re time zones)

    For private conversations an instant messaging system allows you to converse in text with specific individuals or defined groups, regardless of their location.



    Media

    Audio and video streaming in provided by linking to existing Internet media, such as internet radio or TV stations. Each land owner can set the media stream on their own land, and any players who visit that land can see or hear the selected stream.


    With access to a streaming server, basic home recording equipment and some free software it’s pretty easy to stream a live performance from a real venue or from your lounge room, to a location in Second Life.

    (photo – me in harness)

    Other Tools

    Second life includes a simple but powerful 3D graphics program for creating virtual objects, a scripting language to animate objects with interactive behaviors, and tools for managing your inventory of objects, notecards, photos, soundfiles, landmarks, body parts and other useful stuff.

    So, who is OhMy Kidd?

    (slide – OhMy with Uke)

    OhMy Kidd is my avatar, the persona I take on when I log on to Second Life. He’s the body that lets the other players see me, and the eyes through which I see them. For a first impression, lets look at OhMy’s profile, which any player can see with two click of the mouse.

    (profile from my bio and explanation)

    OhMy’s four months in Second Life are not enough to make him an old hand, but he’s no longer a “noob”. Here’s what he had to say when he was just ten days old, as published in the Second Life Newsletter readers’ letters section.

    (Newsletter text)

    OhMy has taken his own advice when it comes to joining in – as of last Sunday he has 38 friends, is a member of 19 groups, has 2,929 objects in his inventory.

    (inventory screenshot)

    OhMy performs acoustic music in Second Life, folk rock that he calls hippy music with a haircut. He spends a fair bit of time at performances by other musicians in a similar vein, but he has another side to his character. OhMy like to get down to the alienspeaking crew….

    (VHS segment – alienspeaking. A minute or two with sound, then fade and run vision through following section. Mention limitations when introducing this)

    It was alienspeaking that lead me to create OhMy in the first place. Four DJs, scratching, mashing and rapping from a shed in Rivett with a live audience around the world? I had to see that…….

    The alienspeaking crew had been broadcasting performances on an audio only internet stream for some time when they decided to try performing in Second Life. Second life provides them with a view of their audience, however artificial, that allows them to interact with and respond to their listeners. This in turn is influencing the development of their music and performance.

    Their audience loves the fact that the aliens play live. The aliens involve their audience in the performance, shouting out their names, responding to their actions and gestures, and mixing sound files that audience members send to them into their shows. Occasionally the aliens “abduct” musicians with traditional instruments such as guitar or keyboard to add to their sound.

    The aliens have a core of regular fans, and they are a nice crowd. They often come to the venue with gifts for the other players, and they make a real effort to involve newcomers. While the aliens provide the venue and the music, the audience contribution can include visual effects and amusing gadgets, as well as conversation. Dancing is quite fun, despite the relatively limited control.

    Making friends with other audience members also opened up a range of other avenues for OhMy to enjoy his second life, such as Mr Widget’s regular late night broadcasts from LA.

    (VHS off)

    OhMy Becomes a Cultural Tourist

    Naturally OhMy wanted to explore his new world to find out what else it had to offer, so he defined himself as a cultural tourist and set out to sample the various offerings of Second Life.

    (rolling pics, stops on slide of genre chart)

    Keeping away from the red-light districts OhMy still found plenty to keep him busy. He tried a few sports, like sky-diving and canoeing, checked out the museums, galleries, sculpture gardens, libraries and universities, visited ABC island and attended as many concerts as he could find the time for.

    Live musical performance in Second Life has apparently had a huge surge in growth over the past 6 months or so, with scores of new performers joining a small band of established musicians. Electronic dance music is very popular, but there is also a strong presence of solo or duo performers on traditional instruments, often acoustic guitars. I was able to find this survey conducted in 2006 of musical genres in Second Life which shows that most genres have some presence in Second Life.

    (slide of genre chart – add credit Rik Santos Panganiban alias Rik Riel

    The author, Rik Santos Panganiban, notes that classic rock and top 40 are conspicuous by their absence, despite being the most popular formats for broadcast radio.

    (Pic – Ohmy with guitar)

    Pretty soon OhMy decided he wanted to play music in Second Life too. He bought some land, built a stage, and put together the hardware and software needed to broadcast a solo guitar and vocal performance via shoutcast server into the world of Second Life. Before long, he was putting on his first show.

    (Pic – good crowd at The Pocket)

    Lots of people came, listened, danced, and commented on the show. OhMy made a little money, and some new friends. One of the new friends happened to be a successful second life musician, Maximillion Kleene. Max liked what he heard and before long had helped OhMy get gigs at other venues. Things were going well.

    OhMy also kept up with the aliens, and soon received an offer of “abduction” – the DJs wanted him to play guitar along with their set. With a suitable alien guitar OhMy was ready to learn to play like a DJ.

    (pic – SLNN article)

    Most recently OhMy promoted a befit concert for the Jamm 4 Genes weekend in support of the Children;s Medical Research Institute, with two solo musicians, one duo and a special alienspeaking appearance as well a a performance by dance troop “ChangHigh Trinity Sisters Fireshow”. We raised about $70 from donations by other Second Life residents, and directed visitors to the CMRI website where hopefully some more donations were made.


    (pic – Cybrary Island)

    So what does all this have to do with archiving? From the Sound Curator’s point of view Second Life is relevant as a new broadcast platform for music and other sound performance, akin to podcasts and another step in the democratisation of communications technologies. Second Life is also a promotional tool for artists, which along with myspace and U-tube are supplementing or replacing traditional press kits and video clips. Second Life has already been the site for a major concert to promote Australian music, which has been collected by the NFSA. It’s also the platform for lots of independent and often innovative performance, which at this stage remains un-archived. Big corporate events with name performers and high production standards are a natural target for archiving, but they only present one side of the second life story. The efforts of the do-it-yourself players are an important part of the Second Life experience, too.

    DJs like Alienspeaking are developing their performance in ways which are unique to Second Life. Young songwriters and performers are gaining experience and audiences through the virtual world, some of them will go on to become significant artists. And as for OhMy? OhMy is working on a shoe box of memories, trying to capture some of the content and the context of his own Second Life. After all it won’t last forever, but while it does he’s happy to sing his bunch of songs to whoever cares to listen. If a few people from around the world drop by, and happen to like them, well so much the better.

    One thing is for sure – any attempt to archive the experience of Second Life needs the insiders perspective.

    (slide – archivist of Second Life logo)

    The Archivists of Second Life

    One day OhMy was at a concert when he noticed another avatar displaying his membership of the “Archivists of Second Life” group. A small group of real life archivists has established “Archivists of Second Life” .

    (slide – Archivists of SL fireplace)

    Archivists of Second Life mission statement is:

    * To promote the profession of records/archives preservation and records/archives access in and through Second Life.

    * To provide education, research and networking opportunities for archivists in and through Second Life.

    * To provide leadership in the identification of records/archives of historical value to the residents of Second Life.

    OhMy soon became a member, and while he hasn’t yet made a significant contribution to the group he is keeping up with their activities, which include raising awareness among the SL community of the usefulness and relevance of archiving, investigating the potential of Second Life for providing archival reference services, and exploring the definition of “significance” in a virtual community.

    The Archivists of SL have also responded to the recent announcement of Library of Congress funded programs to archive virtual worlds, including Second Life, and will play a role in this new initiative to preserve some selected environments from within the virtual world. I’m sure one of their concerns will be to preserve not only content, but context, things like the shaky technology that makes you feel like a pioneer, the internal politics, the etiquette and the asthetic.

    OhMy is still pretty perplexed by the challenges of archiving in Second Life. How can an archive capture both content and context from such a complex system? Audiovisual recording lets you capture an event or performance, but without interactivity. Emulation of the Second Life environment can provide an interactive experience, so that a future user can use the Second Life interface to move around and interact with objects, but it’s like preserving a village without the inhabitants, a virtual ghost town. Perhaps actors could take on the roles of performers and audience members, a-la Sovereign Hill or Old Sydney town?

    Finally I’d like to leave you with a short segment of video that demonstrates a personal highlight in OhMy’s career, not because it was a great performance, or a great audience, but because of the comment made by my new Canadian friend.I think Max’s comment says something about the attraction of live performance in Second Life as well – you never know when you might be one of the first to hear something new.

    (VHS – Lilly Pad Max says)
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Archiving in Second Life

    Abstract

    The virtual online world 'Second Life' provides a platform for 'residents' to create in a variety of media, with live musical performance high on the list of popular attractions. Sound effects including background nature sounds, character vocalisations and effects associated with animated objects add to the second life soundscape and strengthen the illusion of immersion in a virtual world. A wide range of streaming media is also available, either user created or sourced from existing internet streaming channels. Institutions, including universities and libraries, are experimenting with the use of Second Life as an alternative interface to web based resources. Library and Archive communities are represented in Second Life by special interest groups which are a diverse, international forum for investigation and discussion of the possibilities and challenges presented by Second Life and other similar platforms.
    The world of Second Life is evolving rapidly and is now four years old, with some users already showing interest in preserving the history and cultural artefacts of the Second Life community. This paper will discuss the authors encounters with the Second Life community, it's history, the activities of archivists working in Second Life, the potential use of Second Life for dissemination of archival resources, and the challenge of collecting and preserving the cultural artefacts of virtual worlds.
    A Personal Journey

    This paper is based on my own experience over the last 4 months as a Second Life resident and performer. My motivation for joining Second Life was a mixture of personal and professional curiosity, but I’ve been surprised by what an interesting chapter this has been in my own life, and speak mainly from the point of view of a individual who wants to preserve some record of a personal journey. Nevertheless my perspective as a Sound Curator of the National Film & Sound Archive naturally informs some of the discussion on Archiving in Second Life, and what I have experienced as a player will help inform what I expect to be a very limited approach to documenting this type of virtual performance.

    So over the next 15 minutes or so I’d like to share with you some of the artifacts that OhMy Kidd accumulated since his birth on 21st April 2007, and we’ll see what kind of story they tell about his journey.

    But first; what is Second Life?

    To quote the Second Life website “Second Life is a 3D digital world imagined, created and owned by its residents”. While ownership is tenuous, dependant as it is on the continued provision of real world computer power by the operators Linden Labs, it’s true that the residents of Second Life are free to imagine and create their own game. This feature set Second Life apart from other online games which generally have a fairly tightly defined scenario, where you are free to choose your role but the overall aims and objectives are pre-determined.

    Of Second Life’s 8 million registered users maybe half a million are regulars of who up to 40 thousand are online at the one time. Individually and collectively these users are creating a virtual culture that is in many ways a microcosm of the real world. It’s a culture with it’s own economy, where the equivalent of $US 1 million can change hand in a day. It’s a culture with it’s own media – press, radio, TV and movies. It’s a culture that values creativity, and one where live performance represents an important shared experience.

    The Grid

    The action takes place on a “game map” that is similar to many other computer simulations. The basic shape of the land is pre-determined by the developers, and the land is sold to players who can then re-form it to their own purposes.

    (map zoom in)

    Each four squares on the close up map represents four physical computer servers, with over 3,000 servers currently installed. Players can walk, drive, sail, fly or teleport to locations on the map to meet people, attend events or participate in other activities.

    (server shot)

    The Search Screen

    (event search slide)

    The search screen is like the Google of second life. This is how you find a concert or art gallery, a particular person, a special interest group, a class, a seminar, a shop or a yard sale.

    Communication

    You can chat to other players in the same area through a simple text interface. This is local but public chat, every nearby player sees all the text and can contribute to the discussion. The new voice feature on Second Life supplements this with an audio “party line” where all nearby players can speak and hear each other.

    (chat log with Yman re time zones)

    For private conversations an instant messaging system allows you to converse in text with specific individuals or defined groups, regardless of their location.



    Media

    Audio and video streaming in provided by linking to existing Internet media, such as internet radio or TV stations. Each land owner can set the media stream on their own land, and any players who visit that land can see or hear the selected stream.


    With access to a streaming server, basic home recording equipment and some free software it’s pretty easy to stream a live performance from a real venue or from your lounge room, to a location in Second Life.

    (photo – me in harness)

    Other Tools

    Second life includes a simple but powerful 3D graphics program for creating virtual objects, a scripting language to animate objects with interactive behaviors, and tools for managing your inventory of objects, notecards, photos, soundfiles, landmarks, body parts and other useful stuff.

    So, who is OhMy Kidd?

    (slide – OhMy with Uke)

    OhMy Kidd is my avatar, the persona I take on when I log on to Second Life. He’s the body that lets the other players see me, and the eyes through which I see them. For a first impression, lets look at OhMy’s profile, which any player can see with two click of the mouse.

    (profile from my bio and explanation)

    OhMy’s four months in Second Life are not enough to make him an old hand, but he’s no longer a “noob”. Here’s what he had to say when he was just ten days old, as published in the Second Life Newsletter readers’ letters section.

    (Newsletter text)

    OhMy has taken his own advice when it comes to joining in – as of last Sunday he has 38 friends, is a member of 19 groups, has 2,929 objects in his inventory.

    (inventory screenshot)

    OhMy performs acoustic music in Second Life, folk rock that he calls hippy music with a haircut. He spends a fair bit of time at performances by other musicians in a similar vein, but he has another side to his character. OhMy like to get down to the alienspeaking crew….

    (VHS segment – alienspeaking. A minute or two with sound, then fade and run vision through following section. Mention limitations when introducing this)

    It was alienspeaking that lead me to create OhMy in the first place. Four DJs, scratching, mashing and rapping from a shed in Rivett with a live audience around the world? I had to see that…….

    The alienspeaking crew had been broadcasting performances on an audio only internet stream for some time when they decided to try performing in Second Life. Second life provides them with a view of their audience, however artificial, that allows them to interact with and respond to their listeners. This in turn is influencing the development of their music and performance.

    Their audience loves the fact that the aliens play live. The aliens involve their audience in the performance, shouting out their names, responding to their actions and gestures, and mixing sound files that audience members send to them into their shows. Occasionally the aliens “abduct” musicians with traditional instruments such as guitar or keyboard to add to their sound.

    The aliens have a core of regular fans, and they are a nice crowd. They often come to the venue with gifts for the other players, and they make a real effort to involve newcomers. While the aliens provide the venue and the music, the audience contribution can include visual effects and amusing gadgets, as well as conversation. Dancing is quite fun, despite the relatively limited control.

    Making friends with other audience members also opened up a range of other avenues for OhMy to enjoy his second life, such as Mr Widget’s regular late night broadcasts from LA.

    (VHS off)

    OhMy Becomes a Cultural Tourist

    Naturally OhMy wanted to explore his new world to find out what else it had to offer, so he defined himself as a cultural tourist and set out to sample the various offerings of Second Life.

    (rolling pics, stops on slide of genre chart)

    Keeping away from the red-light districts OhMy still found plenty to keep him busy. He tried a few sports, like sky-diving and canoeing, checked out the museums, galleries, sculpture gardens, libraries and universities, visited ABC island and attended as many concerts as he could find the time for.

    Live musical performance in Second Life has apparently had a huge surge in growth over the past 6 months or so, with scores of new performers joining a small band of established musicians. Electronic dance music is very popular, but there is also a strong presence of solo or duo performers on traditional instruments, often acoustic guitars. I was able to find this survey conducted in 2006 of musical genres in Second Life which shows that most genres have some presence in Second Life.

    (slide of genre chart – add credit Rik Santos Panganiban alias Rik Riel

    The author, Rik Santos Panganiban, notes that classic rock and top 40 are conspicuous by their absence, despite being the most popular formats for broadcast radio.

    (Pic – Ohmy with guitar)

    Pretty soon OhMy decided he wanted to play music in Second Life too. He bought some land, built a stage, and put together the hardware and software needed to broadcast a solo guitar and vocal performance via shoutcast server into the world of Second Life. Before long, he was putting on his first show.

    (Pic – good crowd at The Pocket)

    Lots of people came, listened, danced, and commented on the show. OhMy made a little money, and some new friends. One of the new friends happened to be a successful second life musician, Maximillion Kleene. Max liked what he heard and before long had helped OhMy get gigs at other venues. Things were going well.

    OhMy also kept up with the aliens, and soon received an offer of “abduction” – the DJs wanted him to play guitar along with their set. With a suitable alien guitar OhMy was ready to learn to play like a DJ.

    (pic – SLNN article)

    Most recently OhMy promoted a befit concert for the Jamm 4 Genes weekend in support of the Children;s Medical Research Institute, with two solo musicians, one duo and a special alienspeaking appearance as well a a performance by dance troop “ChangHigh Trinity Sisters Fireshow”. We raised about $70 from donations by other Second Life residents, and directed visitors to the CMRI website where hopefully some more donations were made.


    (pic – Cybrary Island)

    So what does all this have to do with archiving? From the Sound Curator’s point of view Second Life is relevant as a new broadcast platform for music and other sound performance, akin to podcasts and another step in the democratisation of communications technologies. Second Life is also a promotional tool for artists, which along with myspace and U-tube are supplementing or replacing traditional press kits and video clips. Second Life has already been the site for a major concert to promote Australian music, which has been collected by the NFSA. It’s also the platform for lots of independent and often innovative performance, which at this stage remains un-archived. Big corporate events with name performers and high production standards are a natural target for archiving, but they only present one side of the second life story. The efforts of the do-it-yourself players are an important part of the Second Life experience, too.

    DJs like Alienspeaking are developing their performance in ways which are unique to Second Life. Young songwriters and performers are gaining experience and audiences through the virtual world, some of them will go on to become significant artists. And as for OhMy? OhMy is working on a shoe box of memories, trying to capture some of the content and the context of his own Second Life. After all it won’t last forever, but while it does he’s happy to sing his bunch of songs to whoever cares to listen. If a few people from around the world drop by, and happen to like them, well so much the better.

    One thing is for sure – any attempt to archive the experience of Second Life needs the insiders perspective.

    (slide – archivist of Second Life logo)

    The Archivists of Second Life

    One day OhMy was at a concert when he noticed another avatar displaying his membership of the “Archivists of Second Life” group. A small group of real life archivists has established “Archivists of Second Life” .

    (slide – Archivists of SL fireplace)

    Archivists of Second Life mission statement is:

    * To promote the profession of records/archives preservation and records/archives access in and through Second Life.

    * To provide education, research and networking opportunities for archivists in and through Second Life.

    * To provide leadership in the identification of records/archives of historical value to the residents of Second Life.

    OhMy soon became a member, and while he hasn’t yet made a significant contribution to the group he is keeping up with their activities, which include raising awareness among the SL community of the usefulness and relevance of archiving, investigating the potential of Second Life for providing archival reference services, and exploring the definition of “significance” in a virtual community.

    The Archivists of SL have also responded to the recent announcement of Library of Congress funded programs to archive virtual worlds, including Second Life, and will play a role in this new initiative to preserve some selected environments from within the virtual world. I’m sure one of their concerns will be to preserve not only content, but context, things like the shaky technology that makes you feel like a pioneer, the internal politics, the etiquette and the asthetic.

    OhMy is still pretty perplexed by the challenges of archiving in Second Life. How can an archive capture both content and context from such a complex system? Audiovisual recording lets you capture an event or performance, but without interactivity. Emulation of the Second Life environment can provide an interactive experience, so that a future user can use the Second Life interface to move around and interact with objects, but it’s like preserving a village without the inhabitants, a virtual ghost town. Perhaps actors could take on the roles of performers and audience members, a-la Sovereign Hill or Old Sydney town?

    Finally I’d like to leave you with a short segment of video that demonstrates a personal highlight in OhMy’s career, not because it was a great performance, or a great audience, but because of the comment made by my new Canadian friend.I think Max’s comment says something about the attraction of live performance in Second Life as well – you never know when you might be one of the first to hear something new.

    (VHS – Lilly Pad Max says)
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,810
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
35
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
47
Comments
3
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Archiving in Second Life Abstract The virtual online world &amp;quot;Second Life&amp;quot; provides a platform for &amp;quot;residents&amp;quot; to create in a variety of media, with live musical performance high on the list of popular attractions. Sound effects including background nature sounds, character vocalisations and effects associated with animated objects add to the second life soundscape and strengthen the illusion of immersion in a virtual world. A wide range of streaming media is also available, either user created or sourced from existing internet streaming channels. Institutions, including universities and libraries, are experimenting with the use of Second Life as an alternative interface to web based resources. Library and Archive communities are represented in Second Life by special interest groups which are a diverse,  international forum for investigation and discussion of the possibilities and challenges presented by Second Life and other similar platforms. The world of Second Life is evolving rapidly and  is now four years old, with some users already showing interest in preserving the history and cultural artefacts of the Second Life community. This paper will discuss the authors encounters with the Second Life community, it&apos;s history, the activities of archivists working in Second Life, the potential use of Second Life for dissemination of archival resources, and the challenge of collecting and preserving the cultural artefacts of virtual worlds.
  • Archiving In Second Life Pics More Compressed

    1. 1. Archiving In Second Life ASRA 2007
    2. 2. Archiving In Second Life <ul><li>What Is Second Life? </li></ul><ul><li>Who is OhMy Kidd? </li></ul><ul><li>Alienspeaking crew </li></ul><ul><li>Archivists of Second Life </li></ul>
    3. 11. <ul><li>[ 23:25] Yman Juran: 24 hours from now is 11 PM saturday for you.is this right ? </li></ul><ul><li>[23:26] You: If you want to sugges another time I am happy to promote it as a sperate eventand to do my end of the tech (running audio sream) </li></ul><ul><li>[23:26] Yman Juran: my commitment is early saturday, in the day time from 9-15 in europe </li></ul><ul><li>[23:27] You: Also I have another event from 9 PM Saturday SL time maybe that works better </li></ul><ul><li>[23:27] Yman Juran: and then I suggested to do the show in SL at 12.15 PM but is it then sunday in SL </li></ul><ul><li>[23:27] You: Yes, and it is around 9:27 in Europe now? </li></ul><ul><li>[23:27] Yman Juran: no it is 8.27 </li></ul><ul><li>[23:27] You: OK sorry </li></ul><ul><li>[23:27] Yman Juran: in the morning </li></ul><ul><li>[23:27] You: in the morning, right? </li></ul><ul><li>[23:28] Yman Juran: and one day and 4 hours from now gets us to 12.30 </li></ul><ul><li>[23:29] Yman Juran: PM SL time </li></ul><ul><li>[23:29] Yman Juran: or...????? </li></ul><ul><li>[23:29] You: soI'm trying to hink in your time now - I think my event starts at 7 am European time tomorrow and goes to about 9:15 with the present schedule </li></ul><ul><li>[23:30] You: Your place in the original schedule was at 8 am </li></ul><ul><li>[23:30] Yman Juran: right </li></ul><ul><li>[23:30] Yman Juran: which was 8 in the morning, half an hour ago </li></ul><ul><li>[23:31] You: exactly, but because of the date difference you arrived to find only me :-( </li></ul><ul><li>[23:31] Yman Juran: right smiles </li></ul>
    4. 15. Reflections on being ten days old How to have fun in SL: DO Figure out what you're here for. My first SL friend asked me &quot;what are you doing here?&quot; It made me think. The answer is in my profile. Fill in your profile - it's a quick &quot;first impression&quot; for others. Look at other people's profiles. Pay attention to the chat around you. Join in. There's more than one way to join in. Get very familiar with search - it's the web of Second Life. DON'T Don't Panic. Take it slow. If the place you're in isn't slow, then it probably isn't fun. Don't be impatient. Sure there's lag, and all the rest, but it's a long way from web 1.0 to Second Life in only 10 years (www being 14 and SL being 4 I think that works out). Don't take it for granted - be amazed! Don't forget that behind every avatar is a real person. Don't forget that YOU are you're avatar. Be free, be real, be cool, be fun, be you. Don't leave a place so quick you don't see what's going on. Don't stay if you don't like it. Best experiences: Dancing with strangers, who were dancing as a group made me feel part of the group. Hearing (and seeing) RL friends performing in SL. OhMy! Being part of a huge crowd at a gig. Freebie shopping frenzy! Worst experiences: Getting stuck in a wall of a house a friend was building in a sandbox. System crashing the first time I was in a huge crowd. - OhMy Kidd

    ×