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Webinar with Carrie Irvin of Charter Board Partners

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Webinar with Carrie Irvin of Charter Board Partners

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Webinar with Carrie Irvin of Charter Board Partners

  1. 1. PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOLS HOW THEY WORK, WHY IT MATTERS, AND WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP ISSUE BRIEF : AUGUST 2018
  2. 2. 2 WE’RE FAILING OUR KIDS LACKING THE BASICS Only one in three 8th graders is proficient or above in math, science, or reading. THE COST OF REMEDIAL EDUCATION More than four in 10 first-year college students require remedial education. These additional classes cost students $1 billion/year. They also make it harder for students to graduate on time. AN INCOMPLETE EDUCATION Only one in four high school seniors is “college ready” in math, science, English, and reading. Percentage of students achieving benchmark score on ACT (2017)2 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% English Reading Math Science Met all Four Percentage distribution of 8th grade students, by National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading achievement level (1992-2017)1 Note: Science category does not breakout “Advanced” 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Reading Math Science Below Basic Basic Proficient Advanced National rates of remedial education enrollment, by student groups3 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Black Latino All students White
  3. 3. 3 IT’S HURTING THEIR FUTURE THE ODDS ARE AGAINST THEM Students with only a HS degree are twice as likely to be unemployed as college graduates. CHANGING JOB REQUIREMENTS By 2020, 65% of all jobs in the economy will require post-secondary education and training beyond high school. A LACK OF UPWARD MOBILITY 4-year college graduates earn 64% more per year than HS graduates, on average. A college degree is worth about $2.8 million in lifetime income. Median annual earnings of full-time, year-round workers ages 25-34, by educational attainment (2016)5 Unemployment rate for workers ages 25-34, by educational attainment (2016)4 Post-secondary education and training requirements6 $0 $10,000 $20,000 $30,000 $40,000 $50,000 $60,000 High school diploma Bachelor's degree 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% High School Graduates College Graduates 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 1973 1992 2010 2020 Less than HS HS diploma Some college/no degree Associate's degree Bachelor's degree Master's degree or better
  4. 4. 4 IT’S WORSE FOR POOR AND MINORITY STUDENTS AN UNNECESSARY DIFFERENCE African-American 8th grade students are three times less likely to be proficient in reading or math as white students. THE GAP BETWEEN RICH AND POOR Students from affluent families are 7 times more likely to earn a 4-year degree than students from poor families. DROPPING OUT African-American and Hispanic students are twice as likely to drop out of high school as white students.8 Adjusted cohort graduation rate for public HS students, by race/ethnicity (2015-6)9 Percentage proficient in reading and math, by ethnicity7 Likelihood of graduating from 4-year college, by family income10 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Reading Mathematics White 8th graders Black 8th graders 70% 72% 74% 76% 78% 80% 82% 84% 86% 88% 90% White African-American Hispanic 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Top 20% of income (>$99K) Bottom 20% of income (<$33K)
  5. 5. 5 WE ARE FALLING BEHIND AS A NATION Despite ranking 4th in per pupil spending, the U.S. ranks 24th in reading, 40th in math, and 27th in science.11 The U.S.’s per pupil spending is 29% higher than other OECD countries.12 RANK READING MATH SCIENCE 1 SINGAPORE HONG KONG SINGAPORE 2 CANADA MACAU JAPAN 3 HONG KONG CHINESE TAIPEI ESTONIA 4 FINLAND JAPAN CHINESE TAIPEI 5 IRELAND BSJG FINLAND 6 ESTONIA KOREA MACAU 7 KOREA SWITZERLAND CANADA 8 JAPAN ESTONIA VIETNAM 9 NORWAY CANADA HONG KONG 10 GERMANY NETHERLANDS BSJG 11 MACAU DENMARK KOREA 12 NEW ZEALAND FINLAND NEW ZEALAND 13 POLAND SLOVENIA SLOVENIA 14 SLOVENIA BELGIUM AUSTRALIA 15 NETHERLANDS GERMANY GERMANY 16 AUSTRALIA IRELAND NETHERLANDS 17 DENMARK POLAND UNITED KINGDOM 18 SWEDEN NORWAY SWITZERLAND 19 BELGIUM AUSTRIA IRELAND 20 FRANCE NEW ZEALAND BELGIUM 21 PORTUGAL VIETNAM DENMARK 22 UNITED KINGDOM AUSTRALIA POLAND 23 CHINESE TAIPEI RUSSIAN FEDERATION PORTUGAL 24 UNITED STATES SWEDEN NORWAY 25 SPAIN FRANCE AUSTRIA 26 RUSSIAN FEDERATION CZECH REPUBLIC FRANCE 27 BSJG PORTUGAL UNITED STATES 28 OECD AVERAGE UNITED KINGDOM CZECH REPUBLIC 29 SWITZERLAND ITALY OECD AVERAGE 30 LATVIA OECD AVERAGE SPAIN 31 CROATIA ICELAND SWEDEN 32 CZECH REPUBLIC LUXEMBOURG LATVIA 33 VIETNAM SPAIN RUSSIAN FEDERATION 34 AUSTRIA LATVIA LUXEMBOURG 35 ITALY MALTA ITALY 36 ICELAND LITHUANIA HUNGARY 37 LUXEMBOURG HUNGARY BUENOS AIRES 38 ISRAEL SLOVAK REPUBLIC CROATIA 39 BUENOS AIRES ISRAEL LITHUANIA 40 LITHUANIA UNITED STATES ICELAND
  6. 6. 6 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 New jobs requiring some college New workers with some college IT’S HURTING OUR ECONOMY VACANT POSITIONS STEM jobs are growing six times faster than non-STEM jobs. Today, employers have 3 million STEM jobs they cannot fill. IMPORTING TALENT As a result, employers in high-growth markets import workers from other states, leaving low-skilled workers underemployed. Meanwhile, their universities import talent to fill STEM classrooms. LACK OF AGILITY In fast-growing economies, local schools cannot keep up with skilled-job growth. Colorado’s annual growth in skilled job demand and skilled workers14 Percent job growth in the last decade13 Foreign students as a % of graduate STEM programs15 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% STEM jobs Non-STEM jobs 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% ElectricalEngineering C om puterScience IndustrialEngineering M echanicalEngineering C ivilEngineering C hem icalEngineering A griculturalEngineering
  7. 7. 7 - 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 Start HS Graduate HS or obtain GED Graduate HS in four years Attend college Obtain a certificate or better Obtain 2-yr degree or better Obtain a 4-yr degree or better Obtain a masters or better BUSINESS LEADERS APPROACH SCHOOL REFORM AS A “PIPELINE” PROBLEM At each step, students fall out of the pipeline. The payoff for plugging the holes in this pipeline are enormous. Colorado business leaders’ effort to increase HS graduation rates for poor students from 75 to 93 percent could help those students earn $5 billion more over ten years – and increase CO’s 10-year GDP by $7 billion. Projected educational attainment of each 12th-grade class in Colorado16
  8. 8. 8 PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOLS PERFORM BETTER, ON AVERAGE CRITICAL DECISION MAKING In a traditional school, the principal controls less than 1% of her budget. She and her teachers have little control over the curriculum or the length of the school day and year. A father can’t move his daughter to a different school that matches her background, interests, or learning style. With public charter schools, families decide what’s best for their kids. Teachers have more control over their lessons. Principals have more control over their budgets. Schools can specialize (and stay open longer). High-per- forming charter schools grow; and underperforming schools are replaced. More than 6,900 charter schools serve 3.2 million students across 44 states. They educate 10% or more of the student population in 200 school districts.19 Charters receive 72 cents on the dollar compared with traditional public schools. That’s a $3,500 difference, per student. CLOSING THE GROUP GAP Black and Hispanic charter school students are twice as likely to be proficient in math than their district school counterparts, and 50% more likely to be proficient in English. MORE LEARNING EVERY YEAR Charter school students, on average, obtain 40 days of additional learning in math and 28 days in reading over students at traditional schools in their area. Additional days of learning of urban charter students over urban district students, by subject17 Additional days of learning of urban charter school students, compared to urban district students, by subgroup and subject18 0 10 20 30 40 50 Math Reading 0 20 40 60 Black Hispanic ELL Poverty Mathematics Reading
  9. 9. 9 ABOUT CHARTER BOARD PARTNERS 1. Nonprofit organization committed to strengthening the governance and quality of public charter schools 2. Recruits leaders with valuable skills, experience, perspective, expertise, and resources that public schools often have a hard time accessing 3. 14 years, 14 states, hundreds of schools, hundreds of new board members, thousands of board members trained 4. Partner with charter school boards, charter support organizations, charter management or- ganizations, state departments of education, authorizers, and quarterback organizations 5. Diversity, equity, and inclusiveness are top priorities
  10. 10. 10 CHARTER BOARD’S ROLE 1. Set targets for improving student outcomes and monitor progress regularly 2. Recruit and hire talented leaders, hold them accountable for results, retain, and support strong leaders 3. Set strategic vision, help set goals, measure progress regularly, and adapt strategy as needed 4. Ensure resources are allocated towards achieving goals, and ensure organization is well run 5. Advocate for the school, and for equitable access to good schools, with decision makers, elected officials, funders, and policymakers 6. Help raise funds for special programming, enhanced offerings, and facilities 7. Ensure that the board is strategically composed, high functioning, and providing tight oversight
  11. 11. 11 REWARD 1. Civic engagement 2. Leadership development 3. Network-building 4. Community relationship-building
  12. 12. 12 CHOOSING A SCHOOL 1. It is easy to find a school that matches your interests. • By teaching method • By student body • By mission 2. Age of students 3. Lifecycle • Start-up • Turnaround • Successful • Successful, growing • Transition (transferring management)
  13. 13. 13 WHAT TO EXPECT 1. Recommend larger boards (13-15) to limit workload for each member 2. 8-10 hours/month; terms last 1 to 3 years, typically renewable 3. Committees allow you to focus on what you’re good at, or learn a new skill • Core o Budget/audit o Communications/fundraising o Governance o Performance/academics • Specialized o Real estate o Gala 4. Fundraising 5. Liability
  14. 14. 14 HOW CHARTER BOARD PARTNERS AND BUSINESS FORWARD CAN HELP 1. Assessing the best school and board role for you 2. Identify schools that match your interests 3. Training you in board governance, budgeting, and education policy 4. Ongoing support throughout your term on the board: • Connect you with other boards to share strategies, identify resources, get advice • Provide tools, templates and tips so you don’t have to reinvent the wheel • Support your board to help them improve effectiveness and make better use of board members’ time • Introductions to stakeholders that can be helpful to the school
  15. 15. INFO@BUSINESSFWD.ORG BUSINESSFWD.ORG 1155 CONNECTICUT AVENUE NW SUITE 1000 WASHINGTON, D.C. 20036 202.861.1270

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