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Webinar: Carmel Martin on the Future of Work

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High school graduates have trouble finding good jobs. There’s a mismatch in our economy, and it is about to get dramatically worse. Business Forward is joined by Carmel Martin, Managing Director of XQ Institute, for a discussion on how to redesign our schools for the 21st century.

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Webinar: Carmel Martin on the Future of Work

  1. 1. Preparing for the Future of Work and Creating Opportunity Now DECEMBER, 2018
  2. 2. 2 XQ INSTITUTE Our mission is to fuel America’s collective creativity to transform high school so every student succeeds — no matter their race, gender or zip code. We want to see that change underway in every high school and in every community — all 14,000+ school districts. About UsOur commitment to rethinking high schools
  3. 3. OVER $130M PLEDGED IN GRANTS TO 19 SUPER SCHOOLS & ORGANIZATIONS Additional Awardees District Partnerships XQ Future Super Schools
  4. 4. Preparing Students For the Workplaces of the Future
  5. 5. 5 AMIDST THE FUTURE WORKPLACE UNCERTAINTY, WE CAN BE SURE OF A FEW THINGS. The first thing we can be sure is that change will be pretty constant. •Increasing numbers will be “contingent” workers, working part-time, on contract without benefits, and often remotely, with employers scaling their teams up or down to adapt to ever-changing conditions Another thing we can be sure of is that many of today’s young people will be working at jobs that don’t currently exist. Many, too, won’t be working at traditional jobs — one employer, one location, with benefits — at all •1/3 of new jobs created in the U.S. in the past 25 years were types that did not exist — or barely existed — before. And that rate seems likely to increase. •The average young American will have at least 11 different jobs between the ages of 18 and 44. And the pace of change could get faster. Note: Carl Frey and Michael Osborne, “The Future of Employment: How Susceptible are Jobs to Computerisation?” 2013 Note: Klaus Shwab, World Economic Forum. The Fourth Industrial Revolution: What it Means and How to Respond
  6. 6. 6 EDUCATION MATTERS — ESPECIALLY COLLEGE EDUCATION 4 out of the 5 fastest-growing occupations require higher levels of postsecondary education. WORKERS WITH MORE EDUCATION EARN MORE. THE WAGES OF WORKERS WITH MORE EDUCATION ALSO GROW FASTER. WORKERS WITH MORE EDUCATION ARE LESS LIKELY TO BE UNEMPLOYED. Note: Farber, Henry. The Decline in Worker and Firm Attachment in the US. CEPS; Princeton
  7. 7. DEMAND FOR DIGITAL SKILLS ARE ALREADY GROWING IN THE MODERN WORKPLACE. 7 45% 71% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% 2002 2016 The Share of U.S. Jobs Requiring Mid- or High-Level Digital Skills Jumped 16 Percentage Points Between 2002 and 2016 Share of U.S. Jobs Requiring Mid- or High-Level Digital Skills Linear (Share of U.S. Jobs Requiring Mid- or High-Level Digital Skills) Note: Mark Muro and others, “Digitalization and the American Workforce,” Brookings Institution, November 2017
  8. 8. DEMAND FOR SOCIAL AND ANALYTICAL SKILLS HAVE BEEN GROWING, TOO. 8 50% 83% 77% 18% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% All Occupations Occupations that require Social skills Occupations that require Analytical Skills Occupations that require Physical Skills Employment in Jobs Requiring Analytical or Social Skills has been Increasing at 4X the Rate of Employment in Jobs Requiring Physical Skills % Change in Employment from 1980-2015 Note: Pew Research Center, “The State of American Jobs,” October 6, 2016
  9. 9. SKILLS NECESSARY FOR THE WORKPLACES OF THE FUTURE WILL CHANGE. 9 -11% -14% 9% 26% 60% -20% -10% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Physical skills Basic thinking skills Higher-level thinking skills Social-emotional skills Technological skills By 2030, Workplace Demand for Technological Skills and Social-Emotional Skills will Increase by 60% and 26%, Respectively Percent Change in Hours Worked Note: Jacques Bughin and others, “Skill Shift: Automation and the Future of the Workforce,” McKinsey Global Institute, May 2018
  10. 10. XQ Institute Why High Schools?
  11. 11. 11 Transformed high schools drive improvement in the elementary and middle grades by setting high expectations for learning while also creating a critical connection to postsecondary options. High schools are the one part of our education system that has made the least progress. New neuroscience research shows that teenage brains are primed to learn. 11 XQ INSTITUTE | WHY HIGH SCHOOLS?
  12. 12. 12 Instead of being challenged to develop their minds, most high school students say they are bored, unchallenged, and uninspired. OUR SOCIETY HAS CHANGED. OUR HIGH SCHOOLS NEED TO CHANGE, TOO. Less than half of our high school students say their school has helped them figure out which careers match their skills and interests. Note 3: Ulrich Boser and Perpetual Baffour, Center for American Progress, “Revisited: Do Schools Challenge Our Students?” March 2017 Note 4 and 5: Gallup, “2016 Gallup® Student Poll: A Snapshot of Results and Findings,” 2017
  13. 13. 13 Closing the racial achievement gap alone would boost American GDP by more than half a trillion dollars a year. $ 551B GDP BOOST XQ INSTITUTE | WHY HIGH SCHOOLS? Strong High Schools = Economic Opportunity
  14. 14. SO, HOW SHOULD SCHOOLS PREPARE STUDENTS FOR ALL OF THIS CHANGE A STRONG FOUNDATION OF ACADEMIC KNOWLEDGE THE SKILLS NECESSARY TO APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE TO NON-ROUTINE PROBLEMS 1. 2. A SET OF COMPETENCIES THAT ALLOW THEM TO WORK WELL AND ETHICALLY WITH OTHERS 3. A GREAT DEAL OF FLEXIBILITY AND ADAPTABILITY 4.
  15. 15. 15 XQ PROFILE OF A GRADUATE
  16. 16. 1.Teaching for Deeper Learning 2.Youth empowerment, voice and choice 3.Community Partnerships 4.Rethinking Traditional Systems 5.Personalized learning powered by tech 6.And a much broader vision of student success XQ DESIGN PRINCIPLES 16
  17. 17. High School & The Future of Work Policymakers Guide
  18. 18. State policies can make a big difference and deliver real results for high school students. But meeting this challenge isn’t merely about passing laws or launching new initiatives. It’s also about galvanizing a statewide movement to transform high schools. 18 WHY GOVERNORS AND STATE POLICYMAKERS?
  19. 19. 19 HIGH SCHOOL & THE FUTURE OF WORK | A GUIDE FOR STATE POLICYMAKERS 19
  20. 20. 20 HIGH SCHOOL & THE FUTURE OF WORK | STATE DATA SHEET All 50 states have an individual data sheet with eight indicators on High School and the Future of Work.
  21. 21. STATE LEADERS POLICIES AND INITIATIVES EMPOWER LOCAL COMMUNITIES TO DESIGN HIGH SCHOOLS OF THE FUTURE MAKE DIPLOMAS MEANINGFUL WITH COLLEGE ADMISSION ALIGNMENT AND MODERN CAREER PREPARATION 1. 2. GET TEACHERS THE TOOLS THEY NEED 3.
  22. 22. 22 THE ROLE OF THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY
  23. 23. 23 PURDUE POLYTECHNIC HIGH SCHOOL In Indianapolis, students enroll at Purdue Polytechnic High School (PPHS)—one of the city’s Innovation Network Schools—to prepare for the high-skill, high-wage STEM jobs of the future. At PPHS, students learn by doing, including through industry-focused projects and design challenges that combine rigorous academics and applied skills in real-world settings. Personal learning coaches help students create a customized daily schedule designed to advance each student’s personal goals and meet unique educational needs. Eleventh graders choose a career pathway in a growing field such as advanced manufacturing or supply chains and logistics. And every graduate has a pathway to postsecondary education and training, including an option for direct admission to Purdue Polytechnic Institute. INDIANAPOLIS, IN
  24. 24. 24 WASHINGTON LEADERSHIP ACADEMY In Washington, DC, just 30 African-American students took AP Computer Science during the 2015-16 academic year. This year, one school, the Washington Leadership Academy, more than tripled that number. Washington Leadership Academy offers four years of computer science along with opportunities to learn through virtual reality. And it places a strong emphasis on leadership to prepare graduates to take an influential role in digital-age civic life. Students have the opportunity to take electives from part- time instructors with specific, hard-to-find skills in fields such as programming and robotics. And teachers leverage digital tools to personalize learning, tailoring instruction to each student’s interests and needs while tracking each student’s mastery of rigorous standards. WASHINGTON, D.C.
  25. 25. The Time is Now 25
  26. 26. 26

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