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2018 useer executive summary presentation 6 12-18 business forward

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Slides from Business Forward's webinar featuring David Foster

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2018 useer executive summary presentation 6 12-18 business forward

  1. 1. 2018 U.S. Energy and Employment Report A Joint Project of the National Association of State Energy Officials and the Energy Futures Initiative June 12, 2018 Business Forward David Foster, EFI, Distinguished Associate
  2. 2. How Is the USEER Survey Administered? • A national supplemental survey that tracks existing BLS QCEW data • QCEW is compiled from unemployment records collected at the state level and then aggregated into 1,057 industry sectors using the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) • The survey is administered to a representative sample of 30,000 employers by phone and internet. Results are integrated with QCEW data. • Analyzes four sectors 1. Electric Power Generation and Fuels Production 2. Electric Power and Fuels Transmission, Distribution and Storage 3. Energy Efficiency 4. Motor Vehicles 2
  3. 3. USEER Content • The survey covers direct employment in 53 different energy, energy efficiency and motor vehicle technologies across 186 NAICS codes located in seven broad industrial classifications. • The survey determines: • Employment numbers • Employer hiring expectations for the next 12 months • Hiring difficulty by technology and industrial classification • High demand jobs and skills gaps • Workforce demographics by race, ethnicity, gender, and veteran’s status • Geographic location by state, county, congressional and legislative districts, and MSA of each technology and industrial classifications 3
  4. 4. USEER Addresses Gaps in Job Numbers The USEER addresses three gaps in current BLS QCEW energy employment data: 1. Business activities essential to the operation of traditional energy companies, but classified in other industry sectors. • Full-time contractor maintenance workers at nuclear plants classified as construction workers. • Outside contractors who have displaced utility in-house construction crews. 2. Renewable energy jobs such as wind, solar, geothermal, etc.; • Residential PV installers, classified as construction electricians or roofers. • Wind development professionals working for non-utility firms. 3. Energy efficiency jobs; • No differentiation between employees producing or installing high efficiency, Energy Star and non-Energy Star products. 4
  5. 5. Electric Power Generation: National Fuel Source QCEW-BLS 2017 USEER Fossil fuels 92,817 187,117 Nuclear 44,753 68,176 Wind 6,050 101,738 Solar 2,708 260,077 CHP 1,649 18,034 Hydro 17,501 65,554 Geothermal 1,117 5,768 Biomass 1,693 26,014 Electric Power Generation: New York Fuel Source QCEW-BLS 2017 USEER Fossil fuels 2,080 5,030 Nuclear 2,991 n/a Wind 97 2,855 Solar 61 12,411 CHP n/a n/a Hydro 1,045 5,859 Geothermal n/a n/a Biomass n/a 3,325 5 2017--Some Examples of Undercounting
  6. 6. 2018 US Energy and Employment Report 6 1,943,614 2,299,546 2,181,511 2,433,928 1,958,778 2,351,300 2,248,523 2,462,743 G EN ERATIO N … TRAN SM ISSIO … EN ERG Y… M O TO R… JOBS SECTORS ANALYZED EMPLOYMENT SECTORS: 4TH Q, 2016-2017 162,000 New Jobs in 2017 in 4 Sectors *Traditional Energy sectors include Electric Power Generation and Fuels Production and Transmission, Distribution and Storage. • Traditional Energy and Energy Efficiency add 133,000 jobs in 2017. • Energy Efficiency leads the way with 67,000 new jobs. • Natural gas electric generation adds 19,000 new jobs. • Overall hiring difficulty declines slightly to 70% • But in key growth sectors such as EE construction jobs, worsens, climbing to over 83% difficulty. • Overall Traditional Energy and Energy Efficiency employers predict 6.1% growth rate for 2018. • Solar jobs decline for first time since 2010, but wind, CHP, biomass, geothermal and low impact hydro all grow. • Motor vehicles add 29,000 jobs, but alternative fuel vehicle jobs decline by almost 40,000, in spite of 25% increase in hybrid, plug-in, and electric vehicle sales.
  7. 7. 2018 USEER Key Results in EPG&F • Natural gas generation gained 19,000 jobs. • CHP grew by 9,000 jobs or 51%. • Biomass generation added 8000 jobs or 55%. • Wind gained over 5,000 jobs or 6%. • Hydro added 1300 jobs or 2% • Coal generation was unchanged. • Solar lost 24,000 jobs or 6%. • 2/3 in CA and MA. • Nuclear lost 3,400 jobs. • Oil, gas and coal Fuels grew between 0.1-1.5%. • Corn ethanol added 6,000 jobs or 12%. Jobs in Electric Power Generation and Fuels Electric Power Generation Fuels Total Solar 349,725 - 349,725 Wind 107,444 - 107,444 Geothermal 7,927 - 7,927 CHP 27,239 27,239 Bioenergy 12,385 104,446 116,831 Corn Ethanol - 34,522 34,522 Other Ethanol/Non-Woody Biomass, incl. Biodiesel - 20,083 20,083 Woody Biomass Fuel for Energy and Cellulosic Biofuels - 31,428 31,428 Other Biofuels - 18,414 18,414 Low Impact Hydroelectric Generation 11,531 - 11,531 Traditional Hydropower 55,341 - 55,341 Nuclear 64,743 8,962 73,705 Coal 92,843 74,180 167,023 Natural Gas 66,385 312,364 378,749 Oil/Petroleum 12,407 510,015 522,422 Advanced Gas 41,034 - 41,034 Other Generation/Other Fuels 34,839 64,968 99,807
  8. 8. Executive Summary—Low Carbon Emissions Energy • 800,000 Americans are employed in low carbon emissions generation and fuels. • In generation, these include: • Solar--350,000 with 250,000 spending a majority of their time, declines of 6.4% and 3.8% • Wind—107,000, increase of 6% • Nuclear—74,000 (generation and fuels), decrease of 4% • CHP—27,000, increase of 51% • Biomass—12,000, increase of 55% • Geothermal—7,900, increase of 37% • Hydro—67,000 (12,000 low impact), , an increase of 2% • Low emissions natural gas—41,000, an increase of 14% • In fuels, these include: • Corn Ethanol—34,500, an increase of over 20% • Woody Biomass/Cellulosic Biofuels—31,400, an increase of 3% • Other Ethanol and Non-woody Biomass, incl. Biodiesel—20,100, a decrease of 13% • Other Biofuels—18,400, a decrease of 18%.
  9. 9. 349,725 Solar Jobs 250,271 spend a majority of their time on solar 1. CA 138,319 2. MA 17,861 3. NY 11,858 4. TX 11,608 5. FL 10,912 6. NV 9,968 7. AZ 9,552 8. NC 9,173 9. NJ 8,818 10. OH 8,092 11. CO 7,819 12. MD 6,881 13. UT 6,335 14. OR 6,212 15. MI 5,532 107,444 Wind Jobs 25,222 8,633 7,320 6,549 5,275 4,736 4,056 3,951 3,228 3,214 2,677 2,088 2,050 1,876 1,839 9 Top Fifteen States for Solar and Wind 1. TX 2. IL 3. CO 4. IN 5. CA 6. MI 7 .FL 8. IA 9.WA 10. NY 11. PA 12. MN 13. KS 14. OK 15. MA
  10. 10. Executive Summary—Energy Efficiency • 2.25 million people work, in whole or part, with Energy Efficiency technologies, a net increase of 67,000.* • 1.274 million of these jobs are in construction, a decline of almost 100K. • However, the intensity of energy efficiency construction businesses has increased with 80.3% reporting that their employees now spend the majority of their time working with these technologies, up from 74% in 2016. • As a result, 1,024,000 construction employees spend a majority of their time on EE than in 2016, an increase of 6,500. • 450,000 Americans are employed in Energy Efficiency business and professional services, an increase of 63K. • 315,000 Americans manufacture Energy Star products, an increase of 26K. *This number does not include jobs in retail trade, such as hardware stores, big box appliance stores, etc.
  11. 11. Executive Summary—EE Employment by Industry Sector
  12. 12. Executive Summary—EE Employment by Detailed Technology
  13. 13. Executive Summary—EE Projected Job Growth in 2018
  14. 14. Executive Summary—EE Hiring Difficulty in 2017
  15. 15. Executive Summary—Clean Economy 2018 Projected Hiring Growth Rates • Generation—8% • Solar—5% • Wind—3.7% • Low Emissions’ Natural Gas—5% • CHP—4.4% • Fuels—2% • Corn Ethanol—1.1% • Motor Vehicles—7% • Plug-in Hybrids—3.7% • Electrics—4.9% • Energy Efficiency—9% • EE Construction—10.6% • EE Manufacturing—9.9% • TS&D—3% • Micro Grids—9.1% • Smart Grid—8.2% • Other grid—4.2% • Battery Storage—7.3% • Pumped Hydro—1.1%
  16. 16. 2018 USEER Thank you! Questions? To download the 2018 U.S. Energy and Employment Report go to: www.usenergyjobs.org For more information or to order custom reports, contact: • David Foster at dafoster@energyfuturesinitiative.org • Sandy Fazeli at sfazeli@naseo.org • David Ellis at ddellis@energyfuturesinitiative.org 16

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