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Ibm information archive architecture and deployment sg247843

  1. 1. Front coverIBM Information ArchiveArchitecture and DeploymentUniversal storage repository for alltypes of contentHigh security with Enhanced TamperProtectionSupport for multiple accessmethods Bertrand Dufrasne Frank Boerner Andreas Feldner Roland Hoppe Kai Nunnemann Daniel Wendler Rene Wuellenweberibm.com/redbooks
  2. 2. International Technical Support OrganizationIBM Information Archive: Architecture and DeploymentAugust 2010 SG24-7843-00
  3. 3. Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on page ix.First Edition (August 2010)This edition applies to the IBM Information Archive V1.2 (program number 5608-IAF).© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2010. All rights reserved.Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP ScheduleContract with IBM Corp.
  4. 4. Contents Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .x Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi The team who wrote this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi Now you can become a published author, too! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Stay connected to IBM Redbooks publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Chapter 1. Introduction to archiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 The business need for archiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2 IBM Smart Archive Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.3 Introducing IBM Information Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.3.1 Information Archive key objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.3.2 Information Archive key features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.3.3 Information Archive value proposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4 Archiving reference architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Chapter 2. IBM Information Archive overview and components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.1 Information Archive overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.1.1 Information Archive archiving concepts and features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.1.2 Information Archive security and data retention compliance features. . . . . . . . . . 11 2.1.3 Information Archive hardware and software overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.2 Hardware components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.2.1 Rack and intelligent power distribution unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.2.2 Cluster nodes (2231-S2M) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.2.3 Information Archive Management Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.2.4 RSM server for Information Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.2.5 Information Archive Storage Controller (2231-D1A) and expansion drawer (2231-D1B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.2.6 Information Archive SAN switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2.2.7 Information Archive Ethernet switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.2.8 Console kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.3 Software components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.3.1 IBM Tivoli Storage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.3.2 IBM System Storage Archive Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.3.3 General Parallel File System (GPFS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2.3.4 Remote Support Manager for Information Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2.3.5 DS Storage Manager for Information Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2.3.6 IBM Systems Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 2.3.7 Integrated Solutions Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 2.4 Storage configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 2.4.1 Storage controller configuration and management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 2.4.2 Storage configuration and partitioning for Storage Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2.4.3 Enhanced Remote Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2.5 Cabling / SAN zoning / TCP/IP addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2.5.1 KVM cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.5.2 SAN cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2.5.3 Ethernet connectivity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved. iii
  5. 5. 2.5.4 TCP/IP addresses assigned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Chapter 3. Planning and installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.1 Determining how many collections you need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 3.2 Hardware configuration planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 3.2.1 Planning for Information Archive cluster nodes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 3.2.2 Disk storage and capacity planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 3.2.3 Planning the network connection type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 3.2.4 Planning tape attachment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 3.2.5 High availability with additional cluster nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 3.2.6 Planning Enhanced Remote Mirroring configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 3.3 Integration planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.1 Before creating any collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.2 Document protection levels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.3 System Storage Archive Manager Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 3.3.4 Enhanced Tamper Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 3.3.5 LDAP considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 3.3.6 Time server requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 3.3.7 Backing up the appliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 3.4 Preparing for installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 3.4.1 General planning considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 3.4.2 Initial configuration worksheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 3.4.3 Alerting and monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 3.4.4 Enhanced Remote Mirroring configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 3.5 Physical installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 3.5.1 Hardware installation (performed by IBM service representative) . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 3.5.2 Running the Initial Configuration Wizard (ICW) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 3.5.3 Assigning administrative user roles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 3.5.4 Changing RSM server passwords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.5.5 Configuring the call home feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.5.6 Activating SAN switch ports 8 through 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 3.5.7 Attaching tape drives and tape libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 3.5.8 Configuring the Enhanced Remote Mirroring feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Chapter 4. System administration and operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 4.1 Information Archive administration tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 4.1.1 User and group management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 4.1.2 Changing the passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 4.1.3 Software updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 4.1.4 System monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 4.1.5 RSM management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 4.1.6 DS Storage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 4.2 Operations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 4.2.1 Accessing the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 4.2.2 Shutting down the appliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 4.2.3 Starting up the appliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 4.2.4 Rebooting the servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 4.2.5 Maintenance mode for cluster node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.2.6 Suspending a collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 4.2.7 Resuming a collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 4.2.8 Retrieving error logs and traces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 4.3 Information Archive Command Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 4.3.1 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110iv IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  6. 6. 4.3.2 Accessing the Information Archive CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 4.3.3 CLI command categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 4.3.4 Using the Information Archive CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111Chapter 5. System Storage Archive Manager Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1155.1 System Storage Archive Manager Collection overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1165.2 IBM System Storage Archive Manager overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 5.2.1 IBM System Storage Archive Manager architecture overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 5.2.2 IBM System Storage Archive Manager basic concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1275.3 IBM System Storage Archive Manager features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 5.3.1 Access control and authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 5.3.2 Archive copy group retention parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 5.3.3 Chronological archive retention. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 5.3.4 Event-based retention policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 5.3.5 Deletion hold and release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5.3.6 Data retention protection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5.3.7 Expiration processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 5.3.8 Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 5.3.9 Data shredding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 5.3.10 Data deduplication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 5.3.11 Archive process of a System Storage Archive Manager Collection . . . . . . . . . 1425.4 Creating and maintaining a System Storage Archive Manager Collection . . . . . . . . . 143 5.4.1 Creating a System Storage Archive Manager Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 5.4.2 What is preconfigured with System Storage Archive Manager Collection . . . . . 148 5.4.3 System Storage Archive Manager collection administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 5.4.4 Granting client nodes access to a System Storage Archive Manager Collection 1655.5 Supported archive applications for System Storage Archive Manager Collections. . . 1665.6 Differences between System Storage Archive Manager Collections and File Archive Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166Chapter 6. File Archive Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1676.1 File Archive Collections overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1686.2 Network File System (NFS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 6.2.1 Archive process with File Archive Collections (NFS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 6.2.2 Policy-based document retention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 6.2.3 Metafiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 6.2.4 Initial disk storage and secondary disk storage category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 6.2.5 Additional considerations for File Archive Collections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1816.3 Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1826.4 Creating and maintaining a File Archive Collection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 6.4.1 Creating a File Archive Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.2 What is preconfigured with the File Archive Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 6.4.3 File Archive Collection administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 6.4.4 Sharing directories and granting client nodes access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 6.4.5 Using the data share and the metafile share of a File Archive Collection. . . . . . 2186.5 Archive applications supporting File Archive Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226Chapter 7. LDAP environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2277.1 Introduction to directories and LDAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 7.1.1 Directory components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 7.1.2 Directory and directory services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2287.2 LDAP usage within Information Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 7.2.1 LDAP servers used in our scenarios. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 7.2.2 Names used in our scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 Contents v
  7. 7. 7.3 Configuring Information Archive with IBM Tivoli Directory Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 7.3.1 Configuring the server instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 7.3.2 Configuring the LDAP objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 7.3.3 Using the ITDS LDAP server from Information Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 7.4 Tivoli Directory Services in IBM i. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 7.4.1 Basic configuration for IBM Tivoli Directory Server on IBM i. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 7.4.2 Starting and stopping the Tivoli Directory Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 7.4.3 Populating the LDAP directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 7.4.4 Using the IBM Tivoli Directory Server on IBM i with Information Archive . . . . . . 248 7.5 Configuring Information Archive with OpenLDAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 7.5.1 Configuring the LDAP objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 7.5.2 Using the OpenLDAP server from Information Archive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 7.6 Configuring Information Archive with Microsoft Active Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 7.6.1 Preparing Microsoft Active Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 7.6.2 Configuring the LDAP objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 7.6.3 Using the Active Directory server from Information Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 Chapter 8. Integrating IBM Information Archive with archiving applications . . . . . . 261 8.1 IBM Enterprise Content Management portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 8.1.1 IBM Content Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 8.1.2 IBM Content Manager OnDemand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264 8.1.3 IBM FileNet P8 Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 8.2 System Storage Archive Manager-based Integration with Information Archive . . . . . 266 8.2.1 Integrating IBM Tivoli Storage Manager backup-archive client with a System Storage Archive Manager Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266 8.2.2 Integrating IBM Tivoli Storage Manager API with a System Storage Archive Manager Collection (using dapismp) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 8.2.3 Integrating Content Manager with Information Archive System Storage Archive Manager Collection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290 8.2.4 Integrating Content Manager OnDemand with System Storage Archive Manager Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315 8.2.5 Integrating IBM FileNet P8 with a System Storage Archive Manager Collection 322 8.3 File archiving-based integration in Information Archive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342 8.3.1 Integrating IBM i with an Information Archive File Archive Collection . . . . . . . . . 342 8.3.2 Granting access to the File Archive Collection in Information Archive . . . . . . . . 343 Chapter 9. Monitoring and call home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 9.1 Status monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 9.1.1 Health Monitor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 9.1.2 Event notifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355 9.2 Tivoli Storage Manager Health Monitor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 9.2.1 Configuring the Tivoli Storage Manager Health Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362 9.2.2 Detailed health information for a server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363 9.3 Using IBM Systems Director in Information Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 9.3.1 Configuring IBM Systems Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 9.3.2 Working with IBM Systems Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370 9.4 RSM server for Information Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 9.4.1 Configuring the RSM server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 9.4.2 Working with the Information Archive RSM server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389 9.5 Reporting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 9.5.1 Tivoli Common Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 9.5.2 Document status information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396 9.5.3 IBM Tivoli Storage Manager reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398vi IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  8. 8. 9.5.4 IBM Tivoli Storage Productivity Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3989.6 Logging and tracing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398 9.6.1 Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399 9.6.2 Tracing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400Chapter 10. Tape attachment with IBM Information Archive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40310.1 Information Archive tape attachment overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40410.2 Tape device support for Information Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40610.3 Using tape for Information Archive data migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40610.4 Using tape for Information Archive data backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 10.4.1 System Storage Archive Manager Collections backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 10.4.2 File Archive Collections backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40810.5 Planning for tape attachment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409 10.5.1 IBM System Storage Archive Manager and Information Archive Tivoli Storage Manager tape pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409 10.5.2 Database backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41010.6 Configuring tape libraries and drives for use with Information Archive . . . . . . . . . . . 411 10.6.1 Attaching IBM TS3500 library to the internal SAN switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411 10.6.2 Device driver and device attachment verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 10.6.3 Defining LTO4 tape drives and TS3500 library in the System Storage Archive Manager server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 10.6.4 Integrating LTO4 drives and TS3500 library into the storage hierarchy . . . . . . 420 10.6.5 Modifying tape migration thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43110.7 Tape drive encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433 10.7.1 Tape drive encryption methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433 10.7.2 Encryption method setup for TS3500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434 10.7.3 Drive encryption setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43510.8 Persistent naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435 10.8.1 Linux device manager udev . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437 10.8.2 Defining udev rules for tape devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438 10.8.3 Defining udev rules for medium changer commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 439Chapter 11. Information Archive data backup and restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44111.1 System Storage Archive Manager Collections backup and restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442 11.1.1 Backing up System Storage Archive Manager Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442 11.1.2 Restoring a System Storage Archive Manager Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447 11.1.3 Verifying data integrity of storage pool volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45111.2 File Archive Collection backup and restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452 11.2.1 File Archive Collection backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 453 11.2.2 Restoring File Archive Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456Chapter 12. Enhanced Remote Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46112.1 Enhanced Remote Mirroring overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 462 12.1.1 Data replication process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463 12.1.2 Primary and secondary logical drives setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464 12.1.3 Mirror repository logical drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464 12.1.4 Mirror relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46412.2 Enhanced Remote Mirroring configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464 12.2.1 Enhanced Remote Mirroring requirements and feature codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 465 12.2.2 Connecting the Fibre Channel cables for Enhanced Remote Mirroring . . . . . . 465 12.2.3 Establishing SSH-tunnel connection between the mirrored appliances . . . . . . 467 12.2.4 Defining an Information Archive to be the secondary appliance for Enhanced Remote Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468 12.2.5 Synchronizing data between the primary and secondary appliances . . . . . . . . 470 Contents vii
  9. 9. 12.3 Using tape drives in an Enhanced Remote Mirroring environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472 12.4 Site failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473 12.4.1 Running a planned site failover or failback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473 12.4.2 IBM Information Archive disaster recovery with Enhanced Remote Mirroring . 476 12.4.3 Failing components in one of the IBM Information Archives with Enhanced Remote Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 478 12.4.4 Connection issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 478 12.5 Administrative tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 479 12.5.1 Suspending the data mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 479 12.5.2 Resuming the data mirroring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481 12.5.3 Removing the mirroring relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482 12.5.4 Restoring a removed mirrored relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 483 12.6 Tips for synchronizing appliances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484 12.6.1 Changing synchronization priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484 12.6.2 Test the mirror communication in the DS Storage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 485 12.6.3 Checking the Enhanced Remote Mirroring status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487 Chapter 13. DR550 migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 489 13.1 Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490 13.1.1 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490 13.1.2 Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 491 13.1.3 Sizing and duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492 13.1.4 Verifying the data after migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492 Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493 IBM Redbooks publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493 Other publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493 Online resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493 How to get Redbooks publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494 Help from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495viii IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  10. 10. NoticesThis information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consultyour local IBM representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area. Anyreference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM product,program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service that does notinfringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the users responsibility toevaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document. Thefurnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, inwriting, to:IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive, Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where suchprovisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATIONPROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS ORIMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer ofexpress or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically madeto the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may makeimprovements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any timewithout notice.Any references in this information to non-IBM websites are provided for convenience only and do not in anymanner serve as an endorsement of those websites. The materials at those websites are not part of thematerials for this IBM product and use of those websites is at your own risk.IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes appropriate without incurringany obligation to you.Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their publishedannouncements or other publicly available sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm theaccuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on thecapabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate themas completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products.All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual businessenterprise is entirely coincidental.COPYRIGHT LICENSE:This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrate programmingtechniques on various operating platforms. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs inany form without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing applicationprograms conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which the sampleprograms are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM, therefore,cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved. ix
  11. 11. TrademarksIBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business MachinesCorporation in the United States, other countries, or both. These and other IBM trademarked terms aremarked on their first occurrence in this information with the appropriate symbol (® or ™), indicating USregistered or common law trademarks owned by IBM at the time this information was published. Suchtrademarks may also be registered or common law trademarks in other countries. A current list of IBMtrademarks is available on the web at http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtmlThe following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,other countries, or both: AIX® IBM® System i® DB2® InfoSphere™ System Storage™ Domino® Lotus Notes® System Storage DS® DS4000® Lotus® System x® Electronic Service Agent™ Notes® System z® FileNet® OmniFind® Tivoli Enterprise Console® GPFS™ Optim™ Tivoli® i5/OS® Redbooks® TotalStorage® IBM Systems Director Active Energy Redpaper™ WebSphere® Manager™ Redbooks (logo) ® z/OS®The following terms are trademarks of other companies:FileNet, and the FileNet logo are registered trademarks of FileNet Corporation in the United States, othercountries or both.SnapLock, NetApp, and the NetApp logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of NetApp, Inc. in the U.S.and other countries.Novell, SUSE, the Novell logo, and the N logo are registered trademarks of Novell, Inc. in the United Statesand other countries.QLogic, and the QLogic logo are registered trademarks of QLogic Corporation. SANblade is a registeredtrademark in the United States.SAP R/3, SAP, and SAP logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of SAP AG in Germany and in severalother countries.Java, and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States, othercountries, or both.Microsoft, Windows, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States,other countries, or both.Intel Xeon, Intel, Intel logo, Intel Inside logo, and Intel Centrino logo are trademarks or registered trademarksof Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both.Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.x IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  12. 12. Preface This IBM® Redbooks® publication can help you understand, configure, monitor, and use IBM Information Archive. As you address your information retention needs, whether keeping valuable content for long periods of time, meeting industry retention regulations, or addressing corporate governance, you need an archiving solution that is secure, scalable, but also cost-effective. IBM Information Archive is the next-generation information retention solution designed as a universal archiving repository for all types of content to help midsize and enterprise clients reduce cost, manage risk, and address clients’ complete information retention needs: business, legal, or regulatory. This highly versatile, smart business system can be a useful tool for clients in their efforts to support regulatory compliance by providing a storage repository with robust security features designed to prevent the alteration or deletion of the storage repository in which information is stored until their business-designated retention period has elapsed. This book is a comprehensive document intended for customers and field personnel who want to understand, deploy, use, and monitor IBM Information Archive.The team who wrote this book This book was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the International Technical Support Organization, San Jose Center. Bertrand Dufrasne is an IBM Certified Consulting I/T Specialist and Project Leader for IBM System Storage™ disk products at the International Technical Support Organization, San Jose Center. He has worked at IBM in various I/T areas. He has authored many IBM Redbooks publications and has also developed and taught technical workshops. Before joining the ITSO, he worked for IBM Global Services as an Application Architect. He holds a Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering. Frank Boerner is an IT Specialist working for IBM Germany. He has 20 years of experience as a customer engineer, software engineer, and solution support specialist. He works in the Archive Solution Competence Center in Leipzig and provides worldwide support for DR550 and IBM Information Archive. Andreas Feldner is an accredited Product Support Professional and region specialist for DR550 and SAN products and is located in Frankfurt, Germany. He works for IBM Global Technology Services and has more than 16 years experience in product support. His areas of expertise include implementation and maintenance of DR550, IBM System p® servers, disk subsystems, and tape storage solutions.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved. xi
  13. 13. Roland Hoppe is a Product Service Professional in Germany. He has 20 years of experience as a customer engineer and support specialist. He works in the Archive Solution Competence Center in Leipzig and provides worldwide support for DR550 and IBM Information Archive. Kai Nunnemann is a Senior Consultant and Category Leader for Information Management at becom - A Divison of Computacenter, in Germany. He has 14 years of experience with IBM hardware and software. His areas of expertise include IBM Tivoli® Software, IBM Content Management software, and related storage hardware. He holds a degree in Mechanical Engineering. Kai is one of becom’s IBM Certified Deployment Professionals Tivoli Storage Manager, and an IBM Certified Solution Advisor Tivoli Storage. Daniel Wendler is an IT Specialist within the IBM MTS Group in Germany. After studying computer science and graduating at the University of applied science Wiesbaden, Daniel joined IBM in 2005. He wrote his final thesis in the eRMM Software Development department at IBM about automated policy-based management of removable storage media. Since then, Daniel is working in the European Storage Competence Center as a product field engineer for RMSS products. He provides post-sales support for enterprise tape libraries, Open System virtualization engines and enterprise tape encryption solutions. Rene Wuellenweber is an accredited Product Service Professional working for IBM in Germany. He has 12 years of experience as a customer engineer, supporting DASD Midrange products and working as solution support specialist. Rene works in the Archive Solution Competence Center in Leipzig and provides worldwide support for DR550 and IBM Information Archive. Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project: BJ Klingenberg, Bonnie Pulver, Mike Griese, Neeta Garimella, Erick Kissel, Greg McBride, Bryan Jen, Braynt Lee, Jason Auvenshine, Linda Benhase, Tony Ciaravella, Chris Zukowski, Roger Wofford, Michael Griese, Jim Saunders, Manuel Avalos Vega, Carlos Sandoval, Don A Hantzsche, Brian Ashmore, Kelly Axup, Matthias Jung, Nils Haustein, Stefan Roth, Stefan Bender, Alexander Safonov and Harald Uebele.xii IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  14. 14. Now you can become a published author, too! Heres an opportunity to spotlight your skills, grow your career, and become a published author - all at the same time! Join an ITSO residency project and help write a book in your area of expertise, while honing your experience using leading-edge technologies. Your efforts will help to increase product acceptance and customer satisfaction, as you expand your network of technical contacts and relationships. Residencies run from two to six weeks in length, and you can participate either in person or as a remote resident working from your home base. Find out more about the residency program, browse the residency index, and apply online at: ibm.com/redbooks/residencies.htmlComments welcome Your comments are important to us! We want our books to be as helpful as possible. Send us your comments about this book or other IBM Redbooks publications in one of the following ways: Use the online Contact us review Redbooks form found at: ibm.com/redbooks Send your comments in an email to: redbooks@us.ibm.com Mail your comments to: IBM Corporation, International Technical Support Organization Dept. HYTD Mail Station P099 2455 South Road Poughkeepsie, NY 12601-5400Stay connected to IBM Redbooks publications Find us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/IBMRedbooks Follow us on twitter: http://twitter.com/ibmredbooks Look for us on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=2130806 Explore new Redbooks publications, residencies, and workshops with the IBM Redbooks publications weekly newsletter: https://www.redbooks.ibm.com/Redbooks.nsf/subscribe?OpenForm Stay current on recent Redbooks publications with RSS Feeds: http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/rss.html Preface xiii
  15. 15. xiv IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  16. 16. 1 Chapter 1. Introduction to archiving In this chapter we introduce the concept of archiving and its business requirements. We explain the need for retention managed data and briefly present the IBM Smart Archive Strategy. This strategy can help you realize the business value of your information while driving down costs and risks as well as ensuring that critical business content is properly retained and protected. As an element of the IBM Smart Archive Strategy, we highlight the features of the IBM Information Archive (Information Archive) and position them in this context.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved. 1
  17. 17. 1.1 The business need for archiving Information or data is essential to any business and for the most part can be considered a company asset. Examples of such data include contracts, CAD/CAM designs, aircraft build and maintenance records, and email, including attachments, instant messaging, insurance claim processing, presentations, transaction logs, web content, user manuals, training material, digitized information (such as check images, medical images, historical documents, and photographs), and much more. With that understanding, companies see a potential value in aggregating large amounts of data. In addition to the sheer growth of data, the laws and regulations governing the storage and secure retention of business and client information are increasingly becoming part of the business landscape, making data retention a major challenge to any institution. Regulated information can include email, instant messages, business transactions, accounting records, contracts, or insurance claims processing, all of which might need to be retained for varying periods of time. Some of this data might be kept several years. Some data might also be kept forever. Moreover, some data must be kept just long enough and not any longer. Indeed, content is an asset when it needs to be kept; however, if kept past its mandated retention period, it can also become a liability. Furthermore, the retention period can change due to factors such as litigation. The characteristics of archived data can vary greatly in their representation, size, and industry segment. It becomes apparent that the most important attribute of this kind of data is that it needs to be retained and managed, so it is called retention-managed data. Retention-managed data is data that is written once and is read rarely (sometimes never). Other terms abound to describe this type of data, such as reference data, archive data, content data, or other terms implying that the data cannot be altered. Retention-managed data is data that needs to be kept (retained) for a specific (or unspecified) period of time, usually years. Retention-managed data applies to many types of data and formats across all industries. The file sizes can be small or large, but the volume of data tends to be large (multi-terabyte to petabyte). It is information that might be considered of high value to an organization, therefore, it is retained near-line for fast access. It is typically read infrequently and thus can be stored on economical disk media such as SATA disks. Depending on its nature, it can be migrated to tape after some period. It is also important to recognize what does not qualify as retention-managed data. It is not the data that changes regularly, known as transaction data (account balance, inventory status, and orders today, for example). It is not the data that is used and updated every business cycle (usually daily), or the backup copy of this data. The data mentioned here changes regularly, and the copies used for backup and disaster recovery are there for exactly those purposes, meaning backup and disaster recovery. They are there so that you can restore data that was deleted or destroyed, whether by accident, a natural or human-made disaster, or intentionally. All these factors mandate tight coordination and a controlled, intelligent approach to archiving. This is what the IBM Smart Archive Strategy is aimed at.2 IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  18. 18. 1.2 IBM Smart Archive Strategy The IBM Smart Archive Strategy is a comprehensive cross-brand approach that combines IBM software, systems, and service capabilities designed to help customers extract value and gain new intelligence from information by collecting, organizing, analyzing, and leveraging that information. This approach, depicted in Figure 1-1, delivers a comprehensive set of solutions, products, and services in a unified and integrated strategy that helps you realize the business value of your information while driving down costs and risks and ensuring that critical business content is properly retained and protected. With the IBM Smart Archive Strategy, you can simplify the archiving infrastructure and reduce overall storage and power needs as well as administrative requirements with the help of integrated appliances and multiple delivery options. Implementing an IBM Smart Archive solution can eliminate unnecessary junk content, helping to improve system and process efficiency and productivity. Reducing discovery costs and legal fees are key objectives, as well as enhancing response capabilities by providing authorized legal staff quick access to and analysis of case-relevant information. IBM Information Archive Figure 1-1 The IBM Smart Archive Strategy The IBM Smart Archive Strategy offers the following capabilities: Optimized and unified ingestion: – Enables a deeper understanding of what information to archive through discovery-based and analytics-based assessment technologies. – Eliminates point solution complexity and cost by unifying data and content archiving through common collection (ingest) and classification technologies. The following examples from the IBM Product portfolio fit that category: – IBM InfoSphere™ Content Assessment software – IBM InfoSphere Content Collector family of offerings, including integration with IBM Optim™ Data Growth Solution software Chapter 1. Introduction to archiving 3
  19. 19. – IBM InfoSphere Classification Module software – IBM InfoSphere Discovery with Optim Data Growth Solution software Flexible and secure infrastructure: – Enables cost-optimized retention with unified, flexible, secure and policy-aware infrastructure. – Speeds time to value through modular, integrated solutions including choice of management and delivery models based on a common information lifespan and policies. These solutions and services include traditional on-premise software, preconfigured appliance, software-as-a-service, cloud-ready and hybrid options. The following examples from the IBM product portfolio fit that category: – IBM Enterprise Content Management (ECM) repositories – IBM Information Archive solution (the focus of this book) – IBM Managed Information Archive Cloud Services – IBM Global Technology Services – Storage and Archive Services Integrated Compliance, Records Management, Analytics, and eDiscovery: Reduce risk, respond more quickly to legal inquiries, establish trust and leverage information using integrated compliance, analytics, records management, and eDiscovery software. The following examples from the IBM product portfolio fit that category: – IBM InfoSphere Enterprise Records software – IBM InfoSphere Discovery Manager and Discovery Analyzer software1.3 Introducing IBM Information Archive IBM Information Archive (Information Archive) is one of the enablers for the IBM Smart Archive Strategy, as one of its possible infrastructure elements. Information Archive is the next-generation information retention solution designed as a universal archiving repository for all types of content to help midsize and enterprise clients reduce cost, manage risk, and address clients’ complete information retention needs: business, legal, or regulatory. Information Archive is a universal, scalable, and secure storage repository for structured and unstructured information. Information Archive application support includes IBM ECM and Optim with policy harmony. Information Archive replaces the IBM System Storage DR550 and offers significant enhancements over the DR550. This highly versatile, cloud-ready, smart business system can be a useful tool for users in their efforts to support regulatory compliance by providing a storage repository with robust security features designed to prevent the alteration or deletion of the storage repository in which information is stored until your business-designated retention period has elapsed. Information Archive is an integrated, appliance-based solution for retaining archived information in a compliant storage environment. Information Archive connects to application servers, receives files and documents from these applications, and stores them in a hierarchy of disk and tape storage. The information is stored in a collection, which is the basic storage repository within Information Archive. You can use Information Archive as the target storage for your archiving applications or you can move information from your application or existing storage domain to Information Archive.4 IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  20. 20. You can manage archived information from a single, simple to use graphical user interface (GUI). Information Archive scales in capacity by adding more disk storage to the collections and scales in performance by adding more file system nodes. Using hierarchical storage management techniques, Information Archive helps move archived information across a hierarchy of lower cost storage devices, including tape. This can help you to match the value of your archived information to the cost of the infrastructure on which it is stored. Information Archive is designed to provide a quick time-to-value so you can begin to realize its benefits very soon after.1.3.1 Information Archive key objectives The key objectives of Information Archive are as follows: To provide a universal storage repository for all types of content, structured and unstructured, compliant or non-compliant data To eliminate complex installation and configuration To scale easily for both capacity and performance To support efficient policy-driven retention and tiered storage management To support standard interfaces into the system for easy integration with applications To protect data integrity for the entire lifespan of the information To offer low Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) by allowing use of mixed media (disk and tape) To support existing retention policies or enable administrators to define customized policies To incorporate current DR550 capabilities and much more1.3.2 Information Archive key features The Information Archive solution offers the following key features and characteristics: Provides a single platform for archiving compliant, non-compliant, structured and un-structured data thus reducing the need multiple systems. Provides customizable data protection features to meet the industrys most stringent data retention mandates. Enables data archiving across multiple tiers of storage, including disk, tape and, other near-line or offline storage, to provide massive scalability and a more cost-effective, energy efficient archive system. Enables specified information protection levels for archive collections. With Information Archive, IBM has introduced a unique 3x3 architecture that allows businesses to configure up to three archive collections on a single system with up to three servers. It allows the flexibility for each collection to be configured with the following information protection levels: – Basic Protection enables the greatest flexibility for managing an organization’s data retention needs. – Intermediate Protection allows IT administrators to increase and decrease retention periods as needed, but information deletion is only allowed after the retention period has expired. – Maximum Protection helps IT administrators manage information with strict business, legal, or regulatory retention needs. Chapter 1. Introduction to archiving 5
  21. 21. Enforces data retention polices that maintain data as non-erasable and non-rewritable (NENR) until deletion is permitted by retention policy. Enables users to archive and retrieve directly from or to their workstations as well as enterprise content management applications. Offers Enhanced Disaster Recovery based on advanced copy services to increase the availability of archived documents and to prevent data loss in the event of a disaster. Implements Enhanced Tamper Protection, a patent-pending feature that prevents root access to the appliance to avoid modification or deletion of archived data. Supports data deduplication, which helps to store a single instance of data on disk and reduces the file size of documents in the archive collections. Data deduplication can reduce the effective data size on disk by 20 to 80%. Provides Hierarchical Storage Management, which automatically distributes and manages data on disk, tape, or both, with the objectives of minimizing access time to data and maximizing available media capacity.1.3.3 Information Archive value proposition The Information Archive value proposition can be summarized as follows: Manage risk: – Offers policy-based or general purpose archiving capabilities to help address compliance and non-compliance requirements: business, legal, and regulatory – Provides enhanced security with encryption for both disk and tape storage – Enforces retention polices that meet some of the industrys most stringent data retention mandates. – Introduces new patent-pending tamper protection technology – Locks data into non-erasable, non-rewriteable formats based on specific business needs. Reduce cost: – Information Archive uses a true storage mix of disk and tape technologies combining fast accessible disk with low cost of tape within a single archive pool. – It can thus maximize your total cost of ownership over the life of the archived data. Improve productivity and efficiency: – Simple to implement (pre-integrated, pre-configured) and manage Industry standard interface (NFS) supports immediate archiving (no custom APIs required) – Easily scales, can dynamically add and remove storage and scales to 1 billion objects across petabytes of storage, from multiple content types – High performing system based on the IBM patented GPFS™ file system technology6 IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  22. 22. 1.4 Archiving reference architecture A reference model describes an abstraction of the key concepts and their relationships. The reference model referred to in this book consists of a three layer architecture as depicted in Figure 1-2. Layer 1 describes the application layer. Applications in Layer 1 run on computer systems that generate, analyze, and process information and store this information as data. Typical examples of such applications are email clients, IBM Lotus® Domino® server, Microsoft® Exchange server, or Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS). Layer 1 applications communicate to Layer 2 components through proprietary or open interfaces (depending on the application). Layer 2 is the archive management layer or Document Management System (DMS), sometimes also referred to as Content Management. Archive management components are usually running on hardware systems other than Layer 1 and Layer 3 components. The DMS or Content Management systems are collecting, managing, storing and retaining data and finally transmitting the data and related information to the archive storage system (Layer 3). The Information Archive appliance is in Layer 3. In Chapter 8, “Integrating IBM Information Archive with archiving applications” on page 261, you can find descriptions and practical illustrations of how Layer 2 applications integrated with Information Archive. Applications Layer 1 ` ` ` LAN Layer 2 Document Management System Archive Layer 3 Appliance Figure 1-2 Reference architecture for digital archiving Chapter 1. Introduction to archiving 7
  23. 23. 8 IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  24. 24. 2 Chapter 2. IBM Information Archive overview and components The IBM Information Archive (Information Archive) hardware and software are preinstalled and delivered in a base rack (2231-IA3) and one optional expansion rack (2231-IS3). The base and expansion racks (or frames) are available in various configurations and capacity options. In this chapter we present an overview of the Model 2231-IA3 and the optional Model 2231-IS3. First, we review the system as whole and its intended usage, followed by a description of each of the elements, hardware, and software, with detailed information about how they are initially packaged, installed, and configured.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010. All rights reserved. 9
  25. 25. 2.1 Information Archive overview The Information Archive appliance is an integrated data retention solution. It is the IBM follow-on and replacement product for the IBM System Storage DR550. The appliance includes preinstalled servers, disk storage, and the Information Archive software.2.1.1 Information Archive archiving concepts and features Information Archive brings together off-the-shelf IBM hardware and software products. The hardware comes premounted in a secure rack. The software is preinstalled and to a large extent preconfigured. It is designed to be easy to deploy. Information Archive can be used to store and manage multiple billions of documents over its deployment lifetime. Information Archive provides policy-managed storage for compliance, archiving, and content management applications. These applications can retrieve files using standard communication protocols, such as Network File System (NFS) and HTTP, and can archive files using NFS or the System Storage Archive Manager API in logical containers, called collections. The Information Archive solution includes time-based and event-based retention options, compression and deduplication of stored data, and compatibility with customer applications that can be used by the former DR550 appliance. Optional features of Information Archive include remote replication for disaster recovery, high-availability server configurations, and tape library support. Figure 2-1 shows a general overview of the conceptual Information Archive architecture. It depicts how applications can store documents into Information Archive over an Ethernet LAN. The documents are archived in collections that reside on disk. The collections can be of two types: System Storage Archive Manager collections and File Archive Collections (archive over NFS). A maximum of three collections (in any combination of System Storage Archive Manager Collections or File Archive Collections) is supported. The Information Archive software includes an administrative Graphical User Interface, the Information Archive Administration GUI (Information Archive GUI). IBM IA Admin GUI Applications LAN One Namespace NFS NAS NFS NAS NAS SSAM Disk Disk Disk Disk Disk Disk Disk Collection 1 Collection 2 Collection 3 Collection 1 Collection 2 Collection 3 Clustered Clustered IBM Information Archive Tape or other devices © 2 00 9 IBM Corp or atio n Figure 2-1 Information Archive architecture10 IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  26. 26. The Information Archive GUI lets you administrate, operate, and monitor the Information Archive appliance, and generate reports. The system offers the option to migrate and back up data to tape. Although optional, tape attachment is highly desirable.2.1.2 Information Archive security and data retention compliance features Information Archive is primarily intended to provide a storage solution for archiving and data retention compliance. Thus, it offers the following retention and document protection features. Document retention The Information Archive appliance provides a number of ways to specify how long documents are retained.You can configure document retention policies, which provide both time-based and event-based retention options. Document protection settings After a document is ingested into archival storage, it cannot be modified until its retention period expires. You can use document protection settings to further restrict the actions that can be taken on archived documents. Document protection levels can be set independently for each collection in the appliance. There are three levels of document protection available for File Archive Collections. System Storage Archive Manager collections only support the maximum level of document protection, which does not allow the deletion of documents or the reduction of retention periods. Enhanced Tamper Protection Enhanced Tamper Protection prevents root access to the servers in the Information Archive appliance. Root access can potentially be used to modify or delete archived data. Enhanced Tamper Protection is a system-wide setting that affects all the collections in the appliance. This feature can be enabled during the initial configuration of the appliance, or at a later time. After being enabled, it cannot be turned off. If you do not enable Enhanced Tamper Protection, you must use other methods to prevent tampering and you must securely manage the root passwords on all servers in the appliance. Access protection Authentication is required for access to archived documents and the Information Archive GUI. For File Archive Collections, user accounts for administrators and archive users can be managed using an external Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) server. Access for users, user groups, or host systems must be granted through the Information Archive administrative interface. Also see Chapter 7, “LDAP environments” on page 227. Two predefined user accounts are provided with the appliance: iaadmin and iscadmin. These user accounts have limited authority, and are intended to be used for a specific set of tasks. You must change the default passwords for these user accounts during the initial configuration of the appliance. Compliance features Information Archive provides a number of features to enable you meet your legal, regulatory, or policy compliance requirements for data archiving. Chapter 2. IBM Information Archive overview and components 11
  27. 27. 2.1.3 Information Archive hardware and software overview The Information Archive, seen in Figure 2-2, is available in several configurations with storage from 8 TB (one collection) up to 440 TB of raw capacity for up to three collections. Similar to the DR550, Information Archive is also available as primary and secondary systems for a Disaster Recovery Protection configuration, based on remote disk mirroring. Figure 2-2 Photograph of the IBM 2231-IA3 rack The Information Archive appliance includes Fibre Channel (FC) ports for external tape attachment but does not include cables or tape drives or tape libraries. You must acquire and attach tape drives to be able to back up your configuration and collection data (see Chapter 10, “Tape attachment with IBM Information Archive” on page 403). The backup and restore process is described in detail in Chapter 11, “Information Archive data backup and restore” on page 441. The software bundle includes Information Archive Version 1.2, the IBM Tivoli Storage Manager 6.x, the IBM System Storage Archive Manager Version 6.x, Information Archive Cluster Version, the IBM System Director Version 6.1.0, and DS Storage Manager for Information Archive, customized for additional protection.12 IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  28. 28. 2.2 Hardware components Figure 2-3 shows a diagram that depicts the hardware components and their placement in the base Information Archive frame (2231-IA3). A standard Information Archive 2231-IA3 base frame consists of: One 2231-IA3 rack (7014 T00 rack - 36U) At minimum, one cluster node (which is an IBM System x® 3560 M2). It is a 4-EIA (2U), 19-inch rack mounted server. It is configured as a two quad-core Intel® processor system. The default system memory is 24 GB and can be up to 64 GB. It also includes standard dual power supplies. One Management Console server (IBM System x 3550 M2) for 2231-IA3 One RSM server (IBM System x 3550 M2) for 2231-IA3 One console kit (1735 3LX with Keyboard, Video, Mouse) and KVM switch Two optional IBM SAN switches (2498-B24 FC switch) Two IBM Ethernet switches (SMC 8126 L2 26 port Ethernet switches) One Storage Controller 2231-D1A (IBM System Storage DS4200) Up to six optional Expansion Drawers 2231-D1B (IBM System Storage EXP420) RSM Server Expansion Drawers Management KVM Switch Console SAN Managem ent Node Switches Ethernet Cluster Node 1 Switches Cluster Node 2 Cluster Node 3 Expansion Drawers Storage Controller 1 Front View Rear View © 2009 IBM Corporatio Figure 2-3 Component locations in 2231-IA3 Chapter 2. IBM Information Archive overview and components 13
  29. 29. The base frame 2231-IA3 can be complemented with one expansion frame 2231-IS3 (shown in Figure 2-4) to provide storage for up to two additional collections. The optional Information Archive 2231-IS3 Expansion frame consists of the following components: One 2231-IS3 rack (7014 T00 rack - 36U) Up to two 2231-D1A Storage Controllers (IBM System Storage DS4200) Up to ten Expansion Drawers 2231-D1B (IBM System Storage EXP420) Disk Expansion 2.5 Disk Expansion 1.5 Disk Expansion 2.4 Disk Expansion 1.4 Disk Expansion 2.3 Disk Expansion 1.3 Disk Expansion 2.2 Disk Expansion 1.2 Disk Expansion 2.1 Disk Expansion 1.1 Disk Controller 2 Disk Controller 1 1 © 2009 IBM Corporation Figure 2-4 Component location in the optional Information Archive 2231-IS32.2.1 Rack and intelligent power distribution unit This section provides details about the Information Archive rack (base and expansion frames), as well as the integrated intelligent power distribution unit (iPDU). Rack specifications The Information Archive rack is a 7014-T00 rack that stacks all the components vertically. The rack comes with doors in the front and back, and includes the Rack Security Kit to secure physical access to any of the Information Archive appliance components. The Information Archive 2231-IA3 (base frame) and the Information Archive 2231-IS3 rack (expansion frame) have a height of 36U and each contains two iPDUs. The servers and (optional) SAN and Ethernet switches are placed in the middle of the rack. The storage units start from the bottom, populating toward the top as the storage capacity installed increases (also see Figure 2-3 and Figure 2-4. The hardware specifications provide detailed information for the rack, including dimensions, electrical, power, temperature, environment, and service clearances. For more information, see: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/powersys/v3r1m5/index.jsp?topic=/iphad/f7 014t00rack.htm14 IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  30. 30. Specifications for the iPDU (PDU+) The intelligent power distribution unit (iPDU), also called power distribution unit plus (PDU+), has power-monitoring capabilities. The iPDU is an intelligent AC power distribution unit that monitors the amount of power being used by the devices that are plugged into it. Figure 2-5 shows a schematic representation of the iPDU. Figure 2-5 The iPDU - Power distribution unit with Ethernet ports All the cabling from the iPDUs to the various Information Archive components is done by manufacturing.2.2.2 Cluster nodes (2231-S2M) Information Archive includes one, or optionally up to three, Information Archive cluster nodes (2231-S2M). Each node consists of an IBM System x (x-3650 M2, Machine Type 7947), running a Linux®-based operating system. Cluster nodes process all the documents that have been saved to Information Archive and perform management operations on the documents that have been archived. All cluster nodes have identical hardware, and they are configured as GPFS cluster nodes. Important: Always order the same amount of memory for each server. Physically, the System x x3550-M2 is a 2-EIA (2U), 19-inch, rack-mounted server. Up to two quad- or dual-core Intel Xeon® 5550 Series processors with QuickPath Interconnect (QPI) technology, up to 2.93 GHz, and up to a 1333 MHz front-side bus are available. This server has a new energy-efficient design with low 675 W and up to 92% efficient power supplies, six cooling fans, altimeter monitored by the Integrated Management Module (IMM) and by IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager™. Up to 128 GB of high-performance, new-generation DDR-3 memory are available. It includes ultimate internal storage flexibility with up to twelve 2.5" hot-swap SAS/SATA/SSD HDD bays. The x3650 M2 provides four x8 (“by 8”) 8 GBps PCIe (PCI Express) Gen 2 high performance I/O slots. It also includes two integrated Broadcom 5709C Gigabit Ethernet controllers standard. In Information Archive, this server is equipped with a dual quad-core processors, and has 24 GB memory installed (maximum 64 GB possible). There are also two dual-port 4 Gb FC HBAs and two 146 GB 15k rpm SAS internal disks configured as RAID 1. One FC Ethernet dual port card is optionally available. Chapter 2. IBM Information Archive overview and components 15
  31. 31. Figure 2-6 shows the front view of the 2231-S2M server. Figure 2-6 Cluster Node 2231-S2M - front view Cluster nodes: The Information Archive Model 2231-IA3 must contain at least one cluster node with a maximum of up to three cluster nodes. Figure 2-7 shows the Cluster Node rear panel. Figure 2-7 Cluster Node 2231-S2M - rear view The minimum configuration supports a single collection with one cluster node 2231-S2M, but this does not allow a cluster node failover. The maximum configuration consists of three cluster nodes and supports three collections. In this configuration, all collections support cluster node failover, but there will be a performance degradation when more than one collection runs on a single cluster node. Each collection needs a dedicated Storage Controller 2231-D1A (DS4200). Consequently, for more than one collection, the configuration requires the 2231-IS3 expansion frame to mount the second and third 2231-D1A storage controllers.16 IBM Information Archive: Architecture and Deployment
  32. 32. 2.2.3 Information Archive Management Console The Information Archive also includes one Management Console (IBM System x, x-3550 M2, M/T 7946) also running a Linux-based operating system. This is your Information Archive appliance utility server running the Information Archive Administration GUI based on the Integrated Solutions Console (ISC). It is also used for monitoring through the preinstalled IBM Systems Director, which provides all core RAS systems management and call home requirements. The Management Console provides a single point of access for all functions. The Management Console (M/T 7964 is a member of the IBM System x family (x-3550-M2). Physically, it is a 1-EIA (1U), up to two quad-core or dual-core Intel Xeon 5500 Series processors with QuickPath Interconnect (QPI) technology, up to 2.93 GHz, and up to 1333 MHz front-side bus, including the following features: New energy-efficient design with low 675 W Up to 92% efficient power supplies, six cooling fan modules, altimeter monitored by IMM, and IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager Up to 128 GB of high-performance, new-generation DDR-3 memory Ultimate internal storage flexibility with up to six 2.5" hot-swap SAS/SATA/SSD HDD bays The system includes two PCI-Express (x16) Gen 2 slots: one half-length, full-height; and one low-profile, as well as two integrated Broadcom 5709 Gigabit Ethernet controllers, standard. In the Information Archive appliance, the Management Console has 4 GB of memory and two 146 GB 15k rpm SAS internal disks configured as RAID 1. Figure 2-8 and Figure 2-9 show the front view and rear view, respectively, of the Information Archive Management Console server. Figure 2-8 Information Archive Management Console - front view Figure 2-9 Information Archive Management Console - rear view Chapter 2. IBM Information Archive overview and components 17

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