Global Enrollment Management 2012 update on GCP

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Global Enrollment Management 2012 update on GCP

  1. 1. The Global Citizenship Program of general education (an update)Bruce Umbaugh Global Enrollment Management MeetingProfessor, Philosophy Webster UniversityDirector, Global Citizenship Program June 18, 2012
  2. 2. GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP PUZZLEKnowledgeRoots of CulturesSocial Systems & Human BehaviorPhysical & Natural WorldGlobal UnderstandingArts Appreciation Skills Written Communication Oral Communication Critical Thinking Quantitative Literacy Ethical Reasoning Intercultural Competence Integrative Learning
  3. 3. Development and Implementation Timeline 20112008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Develop, Build, implement First class bound by Graduates adopt GCP requirements !
  4. 4. International Connections in Developing and Implementing the Global Citizenship Program• Original General Education Institute Team (2009) members: Bruce Umbaugh, Bill Lynch, Stephanie Schroeder• Task Force (2009-2011) included Ron Daniel (Geneva)• Worldwide Directors Meeting, Fall 2009, 2010, 2011• GEM Meeting, June 2011• Global Citizenship Program Summer Collaboratory, July 2011: Anne de Graaf (Leiden), Julianna Bark (Geneva), Jean-Pascal Vachon (Vienna), Bill Lynch (London)• Dorothy Koppel (Vienna) visit, November 2011• GCP Implementation Cafés (conference calls), Spring II 2012• First-year Seminar instructors visit, May 2012: Julianna Bark (Geneva), Kit Barton (London), Claudio Cicuzza (Thailand), Anne de Graaf (Leiden), Dorothy Koppel (Vienna)• GEM Meeting, Today• Second GCP Summer Collaboratory, July 18, 19, 20• GCP Implementation Cafés
  5. 5. What is the point?
  6. 6. Global Citizenship Program competencies are key to:• a “good life” that is satisfying and fulfilling,• responsible global citizenship in the 21st century, and• career success and earning power.
  7. 7. What makes a good life? Dave Pollard: How to Save the World http://howtosavetheworld.ca/
  8. 8. Meaningful work and fulfillment Something that you you love do well doing that makes a positive difference
  9. 9. Guided by Mission
  10. 10. MissionThe mission of the Global Citizenship Program is to ensure that every undergraduate studentemerges from Webster University with the core competencies required for responsible global citizenship in the 21st Century.
  11. 11. GCP Competencies are the Gateway to Career Success“Irrespective of college major or institutional selectivity, what matters to career success is students’ development of a broad set of cross- cutting capacities…” Anthony Carnevale, Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce
  12. 12. GCP and Career Success“Young people now entering the labour market may well have to change employers and even occupations several times during their (probably longer) working lives. They have to be able to manage uncertainty and change, as well as be productive in increasingly competitive circumstances. So the skills they’ll need are not just occupation-specific, but also more general–such as basic literacy and numeracy skills, skills in problem-solving and analytic reasoning, interpersonal skills, the ability to work in teams, skills in using information and communication technologies, and, quite simply, knowing how to learn.” Marilyn Achiron, “Taking stock of skills,” OECD Observer No 287 Q4 2011
  13. 13. GCP and Career Success Todays students will have 10-14 jobs by the time they are 38. Every year, more than 30 million Americans are working in jobs that did not exist in the previous quarter. Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics
  14. 14. GCP and Career Success Todays students will have 10-14 jobs by the time they are 38. Every year, more than 30 million Americans are working in jobs that did not exist in the previous quarter. Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics
  15. 15. Randy Nelson of Pixar• How do you hire for genuinely new jobs?• Resume method won’t work (no one could have done the work before)
  16. 16. GCP and Career Success Randy Nelson says Pixar hires for:DepthBreadthCommunicationCollaboration(and looks for people who are interested rather than interesting) http://www.edutopia.org/randy-nelson-school-to-career-video
  17. 17. What do students need?
  18. 18. What do students need?
  19. 19. What do students need?
  20. 20. What do students need? Raising the Bar: Employers’ Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn, Hart Research Associates, for the AAC&U, January, 2010
  21. 21. What do students need? 30 of 128 hours
  22. 22. Cold-war era general education Cafeteria “A,” 1947, Duke University Archives. Durham, North Carolina, USA. CC by-nc-sa, Some rights reserved.
  23. 23. Distribution requirements only is now unusual inGeneral Education: Source: “Trends and Emerging Practices in General Education,” Hart Research Associates for AAC&U, May, 2009
  24. 24. The majority of institutions uses a distribution model with additional integrative features. Which of these features are part of your institution’s general education program? Other features: 64% Common intellectual experience Thematic required courses Upper-level requirements Core curriculum Learning communities 18% 15% Distribution model Distribution model One or more other28 only with other features features only
  25. 25. Knowledge and Skillsthat our students need (21st Century skills)
  26. 26. GCP and Career Success Every year, more than 1/3 of the entire US labor force changes jobs. Todays Students Will Have 10-14 Jobs by the Time They Are 38. 50% of Workers Have Been With Their Company Less Than 5 Years. Every year, more than 30 million Americans are working in jobs that did not exist in the previous quarter. Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics
  27. 27. UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE GEN ED How do these (all) integrate? MAJOR How do these (all) complement and align? CO- CURRICULUM
  28. 28. Kelly Diecker, Psychology majorResearch Assistant, ICF International
  29. 29. Ben Goldsmith, Philosophy major Kelly Diecker, Psychology majorExecutive Director, Farm Forward Research Assistant, ICF International
  30. 30. Emily Bahr, Mathematics major Aubrey Gohl, Public Relations majorStudying college student personnel, Activity Director,International student services assistantship Adams Place assisted living center
  31. 31. Meaningful work and fulfillment Something that you you love do well doing that makes a positive difference
  32. 32. You have similar stories• Students rarely come to us to major in policy analysis, or activity direction, or study abroad advising• AND we prepare them to do these things, anyway.• The GCP will help us even better prepare students for careers in the 21st century.
  33. 33. Understanding the Global CitizenshipProgram of undergraduate education
  34. 34. Understanding the Global Citizenship Program of undergraduate education• Create purposeful pathways for students to learn• Build on high-impact practices• Cultivate knowledge, skills, and especially integration
  35. 35. Understanding the Global Citizenship Program of undergraduate education• Create purposeful pathways for students to learn• Build on high-impact practices• Cultivate knowledge, skills, and especiallyintegration
  36. 36. PurposefulPathways: Abeginning, middle, and end First Year Seminar introduces program, emphasizes 1 communication, critical thinking, interdisciplinarity, integration Courses address knowledge, communication, critical 2 thinking, ethical reasoning, global understanding, intercultural competence, integrative thinking Global Keystone Seminar serves as capstone 3 for the Global Citizenship Program, and also prepares students to succeed in culminating work in the major
  37. 37. (To increase breadth of knowledge, the same course prefix cannot be used twice in meeting the Roots of Cultures requirement or in meeting the Social Systems and Human Behavior requirement.)
  38. 38. (To increase breadth of knowledge, GCP requirements must be satisfied with courses beyond those required for a students’ first major – if that major is fewer than 75 hours.)
  39. 39. Understanding the Global Citizenship Program of undergraduate education•Create purposeful pathways for students to learn• Build on high-impact practices• Cultivate knowledge, skills, and especially integration
  40. 40. High Impact Practices• First-Year Seminars and Experiences• Common Intellectual Experiences• Learning Communities• Writing-Intensive Courses• Collaborative Assignments and Projects• “Science as Science Is Done”/Undergraduate Research• Diversity/Global Learning• Service Learning, Community-Based Learning• Internships• Capstone Courses and Projects
  41. 41. Understanding the Global Citizenship Program of undergraduate education• Create purposeful pathways for students to learn• Build on high-impact practices• Cultivate knowledge, skills, and especially integration
  42. 42. OECD on high-quality learning environmentsHigh-quality learning environments need to: •make learning central and encourage engagement • ensure that learning is social and often collaborative • be highly attuned to the motivations of learners • be sensitive to individual differences, including prior knowledge • use assessments that emphasiseformative feedback •promote connections across activities and subjects, both in and out of school. Source: OECD, Innovative Learning Environment Project.
  43. 43. Question:Why do I have to take ____ ?
  44. 44. Question:Why do I have to take ____ ?Answer:Global Citizenship Programcompetencies are the means to livinga genuinely good and fulfilling life.
  45. 45. Question:Why do I have to take ____ ?Answer:Global Citizenship Programcompetencies are essential toresponsible global citizenship in the21stcentury.
  46. 46. Students are often highly instrumentalabout their education.
  47. 47. Question:Why do I have to take ____ ?Answer:Global Citizenship Programcompetencies are the gateway tocareer success and earning power.
  48. 48. The Growing Demand for Higher Order Skills55
  49. 49. Wage Premium for GCP Learning OutcomesThe highest salaries apply to positions that call for intensive use ofliberal education capabilities, including (random order): Writing Inductive and Deductive Reasoning Judgment and Decision Making Problem Solving Social/Interpersonal Skills Mathematics Originality Source: Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce
  50. 50. Mean Earnings of Jobs that Emphasize Speaking Mean earnings of speaking quintiles 60,000earnings 30,000 Earnin… 0 q1(low) q2 q3 q4 q5(high) quintiles Source: Georgetown University Center for Education and the Workforce
  51. 51. Mean Earnings of Jobs that Emphasize Writing Mean earnings of writing quintiles 70,000earnings 35,000 Earnings 0 q1(low) q2 q3 q4 q5(high) quintiles Source: Georgetown University Center for Education and the Workforce
  52. 52. Mean Earnings of Jobs that Emphasize Judgment & Decision Making Mean earnings of judgement and decision making quintiles 70,000earnings 35,000 Earnings 0 q1(low) q2 q3 q4 q5(high) quintiles Source: Georgetown University Center for Education and the Workforce
  53. 53. Mean Earnings of Jobs that Emphasize Problem Solving Earnings of complex problem solving quintiles 70,000earnings 35,000 Earnings 0 q1(low) q2 q3 q4 q5(high) quintiles Source: Georgetown University Center for Education and the Workforce
  54. 54. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Lives: A Strategic Approach to Skills Policies”Launched May 2012
  55. 55. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Skills have become the global currency of 21st century economies.” -- OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría
  56. 56. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Since skills requirements change and people need to adapt andlearn new skills over their working lives to ensure occupationalmobility, compulsory education is where people should masterfoundation skills and where they should develop the generaldesire and capacity to engage in learning over an entire lifetime.” Better Skills Better Jobs Better Lives: A Strategic Approach to Skills Policies, OECD Publishing, 2012, p. 26
  57. 57. OECD “Skills Strategy”
  58. 58. OECD “Skills Strategy”
  59. 59. OECD “Skills Strategy”
  60. 60. OECD “Skills Strategy”
  61. 61. OECD “Skills Strategy”Curricula for the 21st century:• Knowledge – connected to real-world experience• Skills – including higher-order skills (Creativity, Communication, Critical Thinking, Communication, Collaboration)• “Character” – behaviors, attitudes, values• Meta-layer – integration and learning how to continue to learn
  62. 62. GCP and Career Success For career success students should develop these capabilities in college, because• the marketplace rewards graduates with the highest levels of achievement in these key learning outcomes, and• they give access to career paths that require and further develop these high level capabilities.
  63. 63. GCP and Career SuccessHow do we prepare students to innovate and to succeed in jobs that don’t exist when they first enroll with us?
  64. 64. June, 2012Arrow Process The General Education Reform ProcessWhy use graphics from PowerPointing.com? “transform students What do we want for for global citizenship students? and individual What students excellence” experience Program University Program Learning Goals Design; Program Mission Mission & Outcomes Assessment Content Plan “core competencies for responsible global Purposeful pathways citizenship in the 21st and a plan for telling century” whether they work
  65. 65. June, 2012Arrow Process The General Education Reform ProcessWhy use graphics from PowerPointing.com? You are here. “transform students What do we want for for global citizenship students? and individual What students excellence” experience Program University Program Learning Goals Design; Program Mission Mission & Outcomes Assessment Content Plan “core competencies for responsible global Purposeful pathways citizenship in the 21st and a plan for telling century” whether they work
  66. 66. Product• Learning outcomes • Program structure • Program content 
  67. 67. What do students need?• Knowledge• Skills• Abilities to integrate and apply
  68. 68. What do students need?• Knowledge – Where meanings come from (Roots of Cultures) – How people and institutions work (Social Systems and Human Behavior) – How the Physical and Natural World works – Forces that push us apart and pull us together (Global Understanding) – Human artistic expressions (Arts Appreciation)• Skills• Abilities to integrate and apply
  69. 69. What do students need?• Skills – Critical Thinking – Written and Oral Communication – Quantitative Literacy – Intercultural Competence – Ethical Reasoning• Abilities to integrate and apply – Draw on and connect multiple from multiple disciplines – Draw on and connect to life experience
  70. 70. Understanding the Global Citizenship Program of undergraduate education• Create purposeful pathways for students to learn• Build on high-impact practices• Cultivate knowledge, skills, and especially integration
  71. 71. Integrative Learning• Knowledge + Skill in one course: – Essentials of Biology I is also a Written Communication course – Meaning of Life addresses Global Understanding and Intercultural Competence – Design Concepts is also an Oral Communication course – Several MUSC courses address both Arts Appreciation and Written Communication
  72. 72. Integrative Learning• Multiple skills in Seminars: – First-year Seminars • Interdisciplinary • address written communication, oral communication, critical thinking, and integrative learning – Global Keystone Seminars • Will address knowledge from interdisciplinary perspectives • as well as all the skills components
  73. 73. Integrative Learning• Global Keystone Seminar prototypes: – EDUC 3250 (Real World Survivor: Confronting Poverty) – SCIN 1210 (Water: The World’s Most Valuable Resource)
  74. 74. Program Requirements (Native/Four-year Students) Eight other coursesTwo seminars • Roots of Cultures (two)• First-year (1st year) • Social Systems & Human• Global Keystone (3rd year) Behavior (two) – Emphasize integration, lifelong learning • Physical & Natural World – Collection points for student • Global Understanding work for assessment • Arts Appreciation • Quantitative Literacy Also address Written and Oral Communication, Critical Thinking, Ethical Reasoning, and Intercultural Competence
  75. 75. Program Requirements (Transfer Students) Other courses and skills, at Webster or transferred, or A.A. degreeTwo integrative • Roots of Cultures (two)• One integrative/applied course • Social Systems & Human• Global Keystone Seminar Behavior (two) – Emphasize integration, lifelong learning • Physical & Natural World – Collection points for student • Global Understanding work for assessment • Arts Appreciation • Quantitative Literacy Also address Written and Oral Communication, Critical Thinking, Ethical Reasoning, and Intercultural Competence
  76. 76. OECD “Skills Strategy”Curricula for the 21st century:• Knowledge – connected to real-world experience• Skills – including higher-order skills (Creativity, Communication, Critical Thinking, Communication, Collaboration)• “Character” – behaviors, attitudes, values• Meta-layer – integration and learning how to continue to learn
  77. 77. What do students need? 30 of 128 hours
  78. 78. Understanding the Global Citizenship Program of general education
  79. 79. PurposefulPathways: Abegining, middle, and end First-year seminar introduces program, emphasizes critical 1 thinking, interdisciplinarity, integration Courses address knowledge, communication, critical 2 thinking, ethical reasoning, global understanding, intercultural competence, integrative thinking Global Keystone Seminar serves as capstone 3 course for the Global Citizenship Program of general education
  80. 80. The mission of the Global Citizenship Program to ensure that every undergraduate student emerges from Webster University with the core competencies required forresponsible global citizenship in the 21st Century.
  81. 81. Bruce Umbaugh bumbaugh@webster.edu Scott Jensen jensensc@webster.edu 20112009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Develop, First class bound by Transfers in Everybod Build, imple Graduates adopt ment GCP requirements GCP (under y in GCP ! 75 hours)
  82. 82. Source: BCcampus_NewsSome rights reserved, CC BY-SA

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