Global Leadership Academy, March 2013

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Presentation to Webster University Global Leadership Academy on the Global Citizenship Program (GCP)

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Global Leadership Academy, March 2013

  1. 1. For the Global Leadership AcademyBruce UmbaughProfessor, PhilosophyDirector, Global Citizenship ProgramMarch 13, 2013
  2. 2. What is the point?
  3. 3. There are two points.
  4. 4. (1)
  5. 5. Global Citizenship Programcompetencies are key to:a) a “good life” that is satisfying and fulfilling,b) responsible global citizenship in the 21stcentury, andc) career success and earning power.
  6. 6. Giving students what they need
  7. 7. Meaningful work and fulfillment
  8. 8. Meaningful work and fulfillmentthat youdo wellthat makes apositivedifferenceSomethingyou lovedoingBased on Dave Pollard, How to Save the World
  9. 9. Guided by Mission
  10. 10. MissionThe mission of the Global Citizenship Program isto ensure that every undergraduate studentemerges from Webster University with the corecompetencies required for responsible globalcitizenship in the 21st Century.
  11. 11. Based on an untitled photo by Dave HoeflerCC by-nc-sa, Some rights reserved.
  12. 12. Why a new general education program?
  13. 13. General Education revision began in 2009
  14. 14. Three things converged:New University mission statementHLC Visit and Report: “Improve assessment practices.”Presidential search: Significant changes ahead.
  15. 15. 2008: Self-study process for reaccreditationcompletedHigher Learning Commission VisitHigher Learning Commission -- 10-year reaccreditationGeneral Education – criterion met, assessment needsattention
  16. 16. 2008-2009: Presidential SearchSummer 2009Dr. Elizabeth (Beth) Stroble joinsWebster University as our11th President
  17. 17. February 2009:Webster submits proposal to the Association ofAmerican Colleges & Universities for a team toattend the summer Institute on GeneralEducation and Assessment
  18. 18. Arrow ProcessWhy use graphics from PowerPointing.com?ProgramDesign;AssessmentPlan“transform studentsfor global citizenshipand individualexcellence”What do we want forstudents?What studentsexperience“core competenciesfor responsible globalcitizenship in the 21stcentury”Purposeful pathwaysand a plan for tellingwhether they workLearning Goals& OutcomesProgramContentProgramMissionUniversityMissionThe General Education Reform Process
  19. 19. General Education revision began in 2009.The Faculty Assembly approved theGlobal Citizenship Program in Spring 2011.Students began study in the GCP in 2012.
  20. 20. General Education revision began in 2009.The Faculty Assembly approved theGlobal Citizenship Program in Spring 2011.Students began study in the GCP in 2012.This is a highly unusual timeline.
  21. 21. Giving students what they need
  22. 22. Giving students what they need
  23. 23. What do students need?
  24. 24. Giving students what they need“Skills have become theglobal currency of 21stcentury economies.”-- OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría
  25. 25. GCP and Career Success Todays students will have 10-14 jobs by the timethey are 38. Every year, more than 30 million Americans areworking in jobs that did not exist in the previousquarter.Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics
  26. 26. GCP and Career Success Todays students will have 10-14 jobs by the timethey are 38. Every year, more than 30 million Americans areworking in jobs that did not exist in the previousquarter.Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics
  27. 27. GCP Competencies are the Gateway toCareer Success“Irrespective of college major orinstitutional selectivity, what mattersto career success is students’development of a broad set of cross-cutting capacities…”Anthony Carnevale, Georgetown UniversityCenter on Education and the Workforce
  28. 28. Kelly Diecker, Psychology majorResearch Assistant, ICF International
  29. 29. Kelly Diecker, Psychology majorResearch Assistant, ICF InternationalBen Goldsmith, Philosophy majorExecutive Director, Farm Forward
  30. 30. Emily Bahr, Mathematics majorStudying college student personnel,International student services assistantshipAubrey Gohl, Public Relations majorActivity Director,Adams Place assisted living center
  31. 31. Not just Webster. Not just socialsciences, social service, and so on.
  32. 32. Not just Webster. Not just socialsciences, social service, and so on.
  33. 33. What do students need?
  34. 34. What do students need?• Knowledge
  35. 35. What do students need?• Knowledge• Skills
  36. 36. What do students need?• Knowledge• Skills• Abilities to integrate and apply
  37. 37. “The service economy is creating a need for new andmore complex skill sets—creativity, problem solving,communications, customer relations, computing,collaboration and teamwork. Increasingly, all workershave to be adaptive and flexible—able to respondrapidly and with independent initiative.”Council on Competitiveness, "Thrive: The Skills Imperative," 2008, p. 21Giving students what they need
  38. 38. The Growing Demand for Higher Order Skills42
  39. 39. Giving students what they needRaising the Bar: Employers’ Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn,Hart Research Associates, for the AAC&U, January, 2010
  40. 40. Wage Premium for GCP LearningOutcomesThe highest salaries apply to positions that call for intensive use ofliberal education capabilities, including (random order): Writing Judgment and Decision Making Problem Solving Social/Interpersonal Skills Mathematics OriginalitySource: Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce
  41. 41. GCP and Career SuccessFor career success students should develop thesecapabilities in college, because• the marketplace rewards graduates with the highestlevels of achievement in these key learningoutcomes, and• they give access to career paths that require andfurther develop these high level capabilities.
  42. 42. What do students need?30 of 128 hours
  43. 43. Cafeteria “A,” 1947, Duke University Archives. Durham, North Carolina, USA.CC by-nc-sa, Some rights reserved.Cold-war era general education
  44. 44. National Research and Best PracticesThe Global Citizenship Program aligns with: Webster University Mission and Values Employer needs Student needs
  45. 45. National Research and Best PracticesThe Global Citizenship Program aligns with research: Association of American Colleges & Universities Research on High-quality Learning Experiences Organization for Economic Cooperation andDevelopment
  46. 46. Giving students what they need“In our research thus far, we have found that four broadcategories of teaching practices and institutional conditionspredict growth on a wide variety of student outcomes ….”
  47. 47. Giving students what they needGood Teaching and High-Quality Interactions with FacultyAcademic Challenge and High ExpectationsMeaningful Interactions with Diverse Peers“Deep Learning “ – analysis, synthesis, reflection, integration
  48. 48. High Impact Practices (George Kuh)• First-Year Seminars and Experiences• Common Intellectual Experiences• Learning Communities• Writing-Intensive Courses• Collaborative Assignments and Projects• “Science as Science Is Done”/Undergraduate Research• Diversity/Global Learning• Service Learning, Internships, Community-Based Learning• Capstone Courses and Projects
  49. 49. High Impact PracticesDemand interaction with facultyHelp students think about novel challengesEngage students in using and applying what theyknowDeepen learning and develop perspective
  50. 50. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Lives: A Strategic Approach to Skills Policies”Launched May 2012
  51. 51. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Skills have become theglobal currency of 21stcentury economies.”-- OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría
  52. 52. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Since skills requirements change and people need to adaptand learn new skills over their working lives to ensureoccupational mobility . . . people should master foundationskills and . . . develop the general desire and capacity toengage in learning over an entire lifetime.”Better Skills Better Jobs Better Lives: A Strategic Approach to Skills Policies,OECD Publishing, 2012, p. 26
  53. 53. OECD “Skills Strategy”Curricula for the 21st century:• Knowledge – connected to real-worldexperience• Skills – including higher-order skills (Creativity,Communication, Critical Thinking,Collaboration)• Values• Meta-layer – integration and learning how tocontinue to learn
  54. 54. OECD on high-quality learningenvironmentsHigh-quality learning environments need to:•make learning central and encourage engagement• ensure that learning is social and often collaborative• be highly attuned to the motivations of learners• be sensitive to individual differences, including prior knowledge• use assessments that emphasiseformative feedback•promote connections across activities and subjects,both in and out of school.Source: OECD, Innovative Learning Environment Project.
  55. 55. What do students need?• Knowledge• Skills• Abilities to integrate and apply
  56. 56. What do students need?• Knowledge– Where meanings come from (Roots of Cultures)– How people and institutions work (Social Systems andHuman Behavior)– How the Physical and Natural World works– Forces that push us apart and pull us together (GlobalUnderstanding)– Human artistic expressions (Arts Appreciation)• Skills• Abilities to integrate and apply
  57. 57. What do students need?• Skills– Critical Thinking– Written and Oral Communication– Quantitative Literacy– Intercultural Competence– Ethical Reasoning• Abilities to integrate and apply– Draw on and connect multiple from multipledisciplines– Draw on and connect to life experience
  58. 58. What do students need?30 of 128 hours
  59. 59. What do students need?Several strategies
  60. 60. PurposefulPathways: A beginning, middle,and endFirst Year Seminar introduces program,emphasizes communication, criticalthinking, interdisciplinarity, integration123Courses address knowledge, communication,critical thinking, ethical reasoning, globalunderstanding, intercultural competence,integrative thinkingGlobal Keystone Seminar serves as capstonefor the Global Citizenship Program,and also prepares students to succeed inculminating work in the major
  61. 61. GCP Courses (Program Content)More than 100 courses, from 16 departments, with 32 prefixes
  62. 62. Integrative LearningGCP integrates learning ofKnowledge + Skill in a course
  63. 63. Integrative Learning• Knowledge + Skill in one course:– Essentials of Biology I is also a WrittenCommunication course– Meaning of Life addresses Global Understandingand Intercultural Competence– Design Concepts is also an Oral Communicationcourse– Dance as an Art Form is also a Critical Thinkingcourse
  64. 64. Integrative LearningMultiple skills in Seminars:– First-year Seminars• Interdisciplinary• address written communication, oral communication,critical thinking, and integrative learning– Global Keystone Seminars• Will address knowledge from interdisciplinaryperspectives• as well as all the skills components
  65. 65. Integrative LearningGlobal Keystone Seminar:– Innovative– Third-year experience– All undergraduate campuses– Capstone experience for GCP curriculum– Bring together knowledge and skills of whole GCP– Critical thinking, written and oral communication,ethical reasoning, intercultural competence,collaboration, as well as multiple knowledge areas anddisciplines
  66. 66. Integrative Learning• Global Keystone Seminar prototypes:– EDUC 3250 (Real World Survivor: ConfrontingPoverty)– SCIN 1210 (Water: The World’s Most ValuableResource)
  67. 67. UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCEMAJORGCPHow do these (all)complement andalign?How do these(all) integrate?CO-CURRICULUM
  68. 68. Giving students what they need Every year, more than 1/3 of the entire US laborforce changes jobs. Todays Students Will Have 10-14 Jobs by the TimeThey Are 38. 50% of Workers Have Been With Their Company LessThan 5 Years. Every year, more than 30 million Americans areworking in jobs that did not exist in the previousquarter.
  69. 69. Giving students what they needMy own former students work in (for example)– study abroad advising– policy analysis– health care ethics– managing online learning– nonprofit advocacy– logistics management– museum administration
  70. 70. Giving students what they need• Students rarely come to us to major in policyanalysis, or health care ethics, or study abroadadvising, or managing online learning• AND we prepare them to do these things,anyway.• The GCP will help us even better preparestudents for careers in the 21st century.
  71. 71. There’s work to come
  72. 72. The next three years:Make every GCP courseexcellent.
  73. 73. Communications
  74. 74. Assessment
  75. 75. Curriculum
  76. 76. Pedagogy and practice
  77. 77. MissionWebster University, a worldwide institution,ensures high-quality learning experiences thattransform students for global citizenship andindividual excellence.
  78. 78. (2)
  79. 79. What is the point?
  80. 80. There’s work to come. . . and if we work hard,together . . .
  81. 81. For the Global Leadership AcademyBruce UmbaughProfessor, PhilosophyDirector, Global Citizenship ProgramMarch 13, 2013
  82. 82. Joi Ito’s Principles of 21st Century Living

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