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A Pedagogy of Autonomy and Care: a manifesto for equity in education and engaged citizenship

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Pecha Kucha presentation for the 2018 "Constitute" (meeting) of the Association of General and Liberal Studies (AGLS

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A Pedagogy of Autonomy and Care: a manifesto for equity in education and engaged citizenship

  1. 1. A Pedagogy of Autonomy and Care: a manifesto for equity in education and engaged citizenship Bruce Umbaugh Professor and Chair, Philosophy Director, Global Citizenship Program Webster University Association of General and Liberal Studies Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania September 21, 2018
  2. 2. •High-quality learning experiences •Transformation •Global citizenship •Individual excellence We promise
  3. 3. UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE MAJOR Gen Ed CO- CURRICULUM
  4. 4. “Students don’t do optional.” Kay McClenney Director, Center for Community College Student Engagement EQUITY
  5. 5. We face a dilemma: We make promises to students about learning/growth. If we don’t force things on students, we fail on equity. If we force things on students, they resent it. How do we avoid inequity and resentment at one time?
  6. 6. UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE MAJOR Gen Ed Require more high-impact practices CO- CURRICULUM Increase demands on students
  7. 7. Equity without resentment: Demonstrate value Teach exhibiting care and respect Increase autonomy & engagement
  8. 8. High Impact Practices • GPA • Students’ reports of how much they learned • General skills (writing, speaking, analyzing problems) • Deep Learning (pursuit of learning beyond memorization to seek underlying meanings & relationships) • Practical competence (working with others, solving complex/real-world problems) • Effects greater for underserved students • Effects cumulative Also: • Personal and Social Development (developing ethics, understanding different backgrounds, understanding self, contributing to community, voting) • Social, emotional, mental well being and flourishing See George D. Kuh, High-Impact Educational Practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter, 2008, Jayne Brownell and Lynn E. Swaner, Five High-Impact Practices: Research on learning outcomes, completion, and quality, 2010, and Ashley Finley, “Examining the Effects of Engagement: High-Impact Practices and Student Flourishing,” Webster University Global Citizenship Program Collaboratory, 2014
  9. 9. High Impact Practices Ashley Finley and Tia McNair, Assessing Underserved Students’ Engagement in High-Impact Practices, 2013
  10. 10. High Impact Practices: Why do they work? Demand interaction with faculty Help students think about novel challenges Engage students in using and applying what they know Deepen learning and develop perspective George Kuh, High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter, 2008
  11. 11. High Impact Practices: Why do they work? Because of caring? Teacher cares for the student, Acts in behalf of the student, And the student recognizes that the teacher cares for the student. See Nel Noddings Caring: a relational approach to ethics and moral education, second edition, updated, 2013, Starting at Home: Caring and Social Policy, 2002, Linda Thompson, “Layers of Understanding,” Family Relations, 1995.
  12. 12. How do we avoid inequity and resentment? Relations of care & respect. Gallup, Great Jobs, Great Lives, 2015
  13. 13. UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE MAJOR Gen Ed CO- CURRICULUM Show respect and care/Bidirectional Relationship Check to see if students learned the material before moving on Provide timely feedback Know about students; let them know about you Engage in high-quality non-classroom interactions that influence students’ growth, values, career aspirations, and interest in ideas What counts as timely feedback? See Charles Blaich, “Research Findings for Deepening Learning,” AAC&U General Education Institute, 2009.
  14. 14. UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE MAJOR Gen Ed CO- CURRICULUM When increasing challenge Share enthusiasm Have a genuine interest in teaching and in helping students grow in more than just academic areas Ensure that students work hard to prepare for class What was a time you worked harder in a class than you thought you could? See Michael Reder, “New Research on Student Experiences With High-Impact Practices,” AAC&U Annual Meeting, 2014.
  15. 15. UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE MAJOR Gen Ed CO- CURRICULUM Meaningful assignments/transparency Help students understand the why & how of assignments, classes, curricula Design clear explanations of assignment/course/program goals and communicate them to students Let students know how success looks Winkelmes, Bernacki, Butler, Zochowski, Golanics, and Harris, “A Teaching Intervention that Increases Underserved Students’ Success,” Peer Review, 2016. Winkelmes, Copeland, Jorgensen, Sloat, Smedley, Pizor, Johnson, and Jalene, “Benefits (Some Unexpected) of Transparently Designed Assignments.” National Teaching & Learning Forum, 2015. Transparency in Learning and Teaching Project (TILT).
  16. 16. UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE MAJOR Gen Ed CO- CURRICULUM Student choice (framed by instructor goals) Flexible curricula A say in readings/course design Choice within assignments Avoid “punitive” syllabi & other communicatio et cetera Ruth Kaplan and Kimberly Neill, “Teaching Required Courses: Pedagogy Under Duress,” Pedagogy, 2018.
  17. 17. Keeping our promise to students Gallup, Great Jobs, Great Lives, 2014. Copyright © 2014 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. The content is used with permission; however, Gallup retains all rights of republication.
  18. 18. UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE MAJOR Gen Ed CO- CURRICULUM Increase student automony and motivation Show respect and care Instructor passion Bidirectional relationship Meaningful assignments Transparency Student choice Increase student automony and motivation; Require more high-impact practices How do we avoid inequity and resentment at one time?
  19. 19. UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE MAJOR Gen Ed CO- CURRICULUM Being transparent, Showing care, Giving choice Student Autonomy Increased intrinsic motivation and engagement Equity without resentment: Demonstrate value Teach exhibiting care and respect Increase autonomy & engagement

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