2012 collaboratory

251 views

Published on

OPening

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
251
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

2012 collaboratory

  1. 1. Second Global Citizenship Program Summer Collaboratory: Review and Preview Bruce Umbaugh Director, Global Citizenship Program July 18, 2012 #gcp2012
  2. 2. (1, 2, 3)
  3. 3. (1)
  4. 4. GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP PUZZLEKnowledgeRoots of CulturesSocial Systems & Human BehaviorPhysical & Natural WorldGlobal UnderstandingArts Appreciation Skills Written Communication Oral Communication Critical Thinking Quantitative Literacy Ethical Reasoning Intercultural Competence Integrative Learning
  5. 5. What is the point?
  6. 6. Global Citizenship Program competencies are key to:a) a “good life” that is satisfying and fulfilling,b) responsible global citizenship in the 21st century, andc) career success and earning power.
  7. 7. (1a)
  8. 8. Meaningful work and fulfillment Something that you you love do well doing that makes a positive difference Dave Pollard, How to Save the World
  9. 9. (1b)
  10. 10. Guided by Mission
  11. 11. MissionThe mission of the Global Citizenship Program is to ensure that every undergraduate studentemerges from Webster University with the core competencies required for responsible global citizenship in the 21st Century.
  12. 12. (1c)
  13. 13. GCP and Career Success Todays students will have 10-14 jobs by the time they are 38. Every year, more than 30 million Americans are working in jobs that did not exist in the previous quarter. Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics
  14. 14. GCP and Career Success Todays students will have 10-14 jobs by the time they are 38. Every year, more than 30 million Americans are working in jobs that did not exist in the previous quarter. Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics
  15. 15. Giving students what they need• Students rarely come to us to major in policy analysis, or health care ethics, or study abroad advising, or managing online learning• AND we prepare them to do these things, anyway.• The GCP will help us even better prepare students for careers in the 21st century.
  16. 16. July, 2012Arrow Process The General Education Reform ProcessWhy use graphics from PowerPointing.com? “transform students What do we want for for global citizenship students? and individual What students excellence” experience Program University Program Learning Goals Design; Program Mission Mission & Outcomes Assessment Content Plan “core competencies for responsible global Purposeful pathways citizenship in the 21st and a plan for telling century” whether they work
  17. 17. What do students need?
  18. 18. What do students need?
  19. 19. What do students need? Raising the Bar: Employers’ Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn, Hart Research Associates, for the AAC&U, January, 2010
  20. 20. GCP and Career Success For career success students should develop these capabilities in college, because• the marketplace rewards graduates with the highest levels of achievement in these key learning outcomes, and• they give access to career paths that require and further develop these high level capabilities.
  21. 21. What do students need? 30 of 128 hours
  22. 22. Cold-war era general education Cafeteria “A,” 1947, Duke University Archives. Durham, North Carolina, USA. CC by-nc-sa, Some rights reserved.
  23. 23. Understanding the Global Citizenship Program of undergraduate education• Create purposeful pathways for students to learn• Build on high-impact practices• Cultivate knowledge, skills, and especially integration
  24. 24. PurposefulPathways: A beginning, middle,and end First Year Seminar introduces program, emphasizes communication, critical 1 thinking, interdisciplinarity, integration Courses address knowledge, communication, critical thinking, ethical reasoning, global 2 understanding, intercultural competence, integrative thinking Global Keystone Seminar serves as capstone 3 for the Global Citizenship Program, and also prepares students to succeed in culminating work in the major
  25. 25. Understanding the Global Citizenship Program of undergraduate education•Create purposeful pathways for students to learn• Build on high-impact practices• Cultivate knowledge, skills, and especially integration
  26. 26. High Impact Practices• First-Year Seminars and Experiences• Common Intellectual Experiences• Learning Communities• Writing-Intensive Courses• Collaborative Assignments and Projects• “Science as Science Is Done”/Undergraduate Research• Diversity/Global Learning• Service Learning, Community-Based Learning• Internships• Capstone Courses and Projects
  27. 27. High Impact Practices• First-Year Seminars and Experiences *• Common Intellectual Experiences• Learning Communities *• Writing-Intensive Courses • Collaborative Assignments and Projects • “Science as Science Is Done”/Undergraduate Research• Diversity/Global Learning *• Service Learning, Community-Based Learning• Internships• Capstone Courses and Projects 
  28. 28. Understanding the Global Citizenship Program of undergraduate education• Create purposeful pathways for students to learn• Build on high-impact practices• Cultivate knowledge, skills, and especially integration
  29. 29. (2)
  30. 30. The last year’s work
  31. 31. July, 2012Arrow Process The General Education Reform ProcessWhy use graphics from PowerPointing.com? “transform students What do we want for for global citizenship students? and individual What students excellence” experience Program University Program Learning Goals Design; Program Mission Mission & Outcomes Assessment Content Plan “core competencies for responsible global Purposeful pathways citizenship in the 21st and a plan for telling century” whether they work
  32. 32. July, 2012Arrow Process The General Education Reform ProcessWhy use graphics from PowerPointing.com? You are here. “transform students What do we want for for global citizenship students? and individual What students excellence” experience Program University Program Learning Goals Design; Program Mission Mission & Outcomes Assessment Content Plan “core competencies for responsible global Purposeful pathways citizenship in the 21st and a plan for telling century” whether they work
  33. 33. Product• Learning outcomes • Program structure• Program content
  34. 34. What do students need?• Knowledge• Skills• Abilities to integrate and apply
  35. 35. What do students need?• Knowledge – Where meanings come from (Roots of Cultures) – How people and institutions work (Social Systems and Human Behavior) – How the Physical and Natural World works – Forces that push us apart and pull us together (Global Understanding) – Human artistic expressions (Arts Appreciation)• Skills• Abilities to integrate and apply
  36. 36. What do students need?• Skills – Critical Thinking – Written and Oral Communication – Quantitative Literacy – Intercultural Competence – Ethical Reasoning• Abilities to integrate and apply – Draw on and connect multiple from multiple disciplines – Draw on and connect to life experience
  37. 37. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Lives: A Strategic Approach to Skills Policies”Launched May 2012
  38. 38. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Skills have become theglobal currency of 21stcentury economies.” -- OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría
  39. 39. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Since skills requirements change and people need to adapt andlearn new skills over their working lives to ensure occupationalmobility, compulsory education is where people should masterfoundation skills and where they should develop the generaldesire and capacity to engage in learning over an entire lifetime.” Better Skills Better Jobs Better Lives: A Strategic Approach to Skills Policies, OECD Publishing, 2012, p. 26
  40. 40. OECD “Skills Strategy”Curricula for the 21st century:• Knowledge – connected to real-world experience• Skills – including higher-order skills (Creativity, Communication, Critical Thinking, Collaboration)• “Character” – behaviors, attitudes, values• Meta-layer – integration and learning how to continue to learn
  41. 41. Seem familiar?
  42. 42. Product• Learning outcomes • Program structure • Program content
  43. 43. Product• Learning outcomes • Program structure • Program content 
  44. 44. GCP Courses (Program Content)More than 100 courses, from 16 departments, with 32 prefixes
  45. 45. Integrative Learning• Knowledge + Skill in one course: – Essentials of Biology I is also a Written Communication course – Meaning of Life addresses Global Understanding and Intercultural Competence – Design Concepts is also an Oral Communication course – Dance as an Art Form is also a Critical Thinking course
  46. 46. Integrative Learning• Multiple skills in Seminars: – First-year Seminars • Interdisciplinary • address written communication, oral communication, critical thinking, and integrative learning – Global Keystone Seminars • Will address knowledge from interdisciplinary perspectives • as well as all the skills components
  47. 47. Integrative Learning• Global Keystone Seminar prototypes: – EDUC 3250 (Real World Survivor: Confronting Poverty) – SCIN 1210 (Water: The World’s Most Valuable Resource)
  48. 48. (3)
  49. 49. The work to come
  50. 50. Communications
  51. 51. Assessment
  52. 52. Curriculum
  53. 53. Pedagogy and practice
  54. 54. OECD on high-quality learning environmentsHigh-quality learning environments need to: •make learning central and encourage engagement • ensure that learning is social and often collaborative • be highly attuned to the motivations of learners • be sensitive to individual differences, including prior knowledge • use assessments that emphasiseformative feedback •promote connections across activities and subjects, both in and out of school. Source: OECD, Innovative Learning Environment Project.
  55. 55. George Kuh on What Makes Practices High-impact In high-impact education practices, students: • invest time and effort, • interact with faculty and peers about substantive matters, • experience diversity, • respond to more frequent feedback, • reflect and integrate learning, and • discover relevance of learning through real-world applications. Source:Kuh, High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter. AAC&U, 2008.
  56. 56. The next three days: • High-impact practices • Integrative Learning • Collaboration
  57. 57. The next three years: Make every GCP course excellent.
  58. 58. (3*) my final point
  59. 59. Three years andone month ago, today
  60. 60. Three years andone month ago, today
  61. 61. Three years and Three years andone month ago, one month from today today
  62. 62. Three years and Three years andone month ago, one month from today today
  63. 63. Signature program
  64. 64. Build “good stuff” into students’ experiences as much as we can• First-Year Seminars and Experiences • Common Intellectual Experiences &• Learning Communities *• Writing-Intensive Courses • Collaborative Assignments and Projects • “Science as Science Is Done”/Undergraduate Researchkk• Diversity/Global Learning ]*• Service Learning, Community-Based Learning-9• Internships _• Capstone Courses and Projects 
  65. 65. To conclude,
  66. 66. I’m filled with optimism.
  67. 67. Optimism in a Bottle, by Robert Banh.CC by. Some rights reserved.
  68. 68. Be optimistic:help to create the future.

×