Generator protection gers

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Generator protection gers

  1. 1. GERS Generator ProtectionPrestación delos servicios de Diseño y Setting Criteria estudios asociados a sistemas eléctricos Certificado No. 637-1 Juan M. Gers
  2. 2. ContentConcepts and protective relaying evolutionFunctions required in the protection of generatorsTypes of Generator GroundingSchemes for generator protectionSetting criteria of generator protectionExamplesHandling of alarms and oscillographs
  3. 3. Preliminary• Faults in power systems occur due to a high number of reasons such us: – Lightning – Aging of insulation – Equipment failure – Animal presence – Rough environmental conditions – Branch fall – Improper design, maintenance or operation• The occurrence of faults is not the responsibility of poor protection systems. Protective devices are essential in Power Systems to detect fault conditions, clear them and restore the healthy portion of the systems.
  4. 4. Preliminary• Protection relays sense any change in the signal which they are receiving, which could be of electrical or mechanical nature.• Typical electrical protection relays include those that monitor parameters such as voltage, current, impedance, frequency, power, power direction or a ratio of any of the above.• Typical mechanical protection relays include those that monitor parameters such as speed, temperature, pressure and flow among others.
  5. 5. Teaching Protection Courses
  6. 6. Teaching Protection Courses
  7. 7. Protection requirements• Reliability: ability to operate correctly. It has two components: • Dependability • Security• Speed: Minimum operating time clear a fault• Selectivity: maintaining continuity of supply• Cost: maximum protection at the lowest cost possible
  8. 8. Classification of relays by construction type – Electromagnetic – Solid state – Microprocessor – Numerical – Non-electric (thermal, pressure, etc.,)
  9. 9. Electromagnetic Torque
  10. 10. Solid State Averaged Ref HysteresisRef Hysteresis
  11. 11. Microprocessor Averaged A/D P
  12. 12. Numeric Direct Samples A/D P
  13. 13. Advantages of numerical relays • Reliability • Multifunctionality • Self-diagnosis • Event and disturbance records • Communication capabilities • Adaptive protection
  14. 14. Architecture of numerical relays • Microprocessor • Memory module • Input module • Output module • Communication module
  15. 15. Numerical relays
  16. 16. Sampled Waveform 8 1 6 4Current 2 0 2 Sine Wave 0 4 samples/cycle 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 -2 -4 3 -6 -8 Sample
  17. 17. DFT N-1I(n) = 2 Σ [ (cos(nk 2π ))- I k=0 k N 2π jI k (sin( nk ))] N DFT N N= # samples/cycle fundamental n= desired harmonic k= sample index
  18. 18. DFT 2π 2πFor k = 0 , n=1 cos( nk )=1 and sin (Nk ) = 0 N N 2π 2πFor k = 1 , n=1 cos( nk ) =0 and sin ( nk ) = 1 N N 2π 2πFor k = 2 , n=1 cos( nk ) = -1 and sin ( nk )= 0 N N 2π 2πFor k = 3 , n=1 cos( nk ) =0 and sin (nk ) = -1 N N 2 (I -jI -I +jI ) IDFT = N 0 1 2 3
  19. 19. ANSI/IEEE device identification No. DESCRIPTION No. DESCRIPTION 2 Time-delay relay 60 Voltage balance or loss of potential relay 21 Distance relay 63 Pressure device 24 Overexcitation / Volts per Hertz 64F Field Ground relay 25 Synchronism-check relay 64B Brush Lift-Off Detection 27 Undervoltage relay 100% Stator Ground Protection by Low27TN Third-Harmonic Undervoltage relay 64S Frequency Injection 30 Annunciator device 67 AC directional overcurrent relay 32 Reverse power relay 68 Power Swing Blocking 37 Undercurrent or underpower relay 69 Permissive relay 40 Field excitation relay 74 Alarm relay 46 Negative sequence overcurrent relay 76 DC overcurrent relay 47 Negative sequence overvoltage relay 78 Out-of-step relay 79 AC reclosing relay 49 Thermal relay 81 Frequency relay 50 Instantaneous AC overcurrent relay 81R Rate of Change Frequency relay50DT Split Phase Differential 83 Transfer device50/27 Inadvertent Energizing 85 Carrier or pilot-wire relay50BF Breaker Failure 86 Lock out relay 51 AC Inverse Time Overcurrent relay 87 Differential relay 52 Circuit breaker 94 Auxiliary tripping relay 59 Overvoltage relay 59D Third-Harmonic Voltage Differential Ratio
  20. 20. Review of Grounding TechniquesWhy Ground?• Safety• Ability to detect less harmful (hopefully) phase-to-ground fault before phase-to-phase fault occurs• Limit damage from ground faults• Stop transient overvoltages• Provide ground source for other system protection (other zones)
  21. 21. Types of Generator GroundsNo Impedance• Cheap• Usually done only on small generators• Definitely a good ground source• Generator likely to get damaged on internal ground fault G System
  22. 22. Types of Generator GroundsLow Impedance• Can get expensive as resistor size increases• Usually a good ground source• Generator still likely to be damaged on internal ground fault• Ground fault current typically 200-400 A G System
  23. 23. Types of Generator GroundsHigh Impedance• Moderately expensive• Used when generators are unit connected• System ground source obtained from unit xfmr• Generator damage minimized or mitigated from ground fault• Ground fault current typically <=10A
  24. 24. Types of Generator GroundsHybrid Impedance• Combines advantages of Low Z and High Z ground• Low Z ground provides ground source for normal conditions• If an internal ground fault (in the generator) is detected by the 87GD element, the Low Z ground path is opened, leaving only the High Z ground path• The High Z ground path limits fault current to approximately 10A (saves generator!)
  25. 25. Hybrid Impedance Ground 51 51 N 52 F3 51 51 N 52 F2 52 B 51 51 N 52 F1 52 G 87 GD G 51 G Trip Excitation, Prime Mover VS 59 N
  26. 26. Generator Protection: Faults
  27. 27. Generator Protection: Abnormal Conditions
  28. 28. New Std C37.102-2005
  29. 29. New Std C37.102-2005
  30. 30. What’s new in Std C37.102-2005 Section 6 – Multifunction Generator Protection Systems • Digital technology offers several additional features which could not be obtained in one package with earlier technology • These features include:• Metering of voltages, currents, • User configurability of tripping power and other schemes and other control measurements logic• Oscillography • Low burden on the PT’s and• Sequence of events capture CT’s with time tagging • Continuous self-checking and• Remote setting and monitoring ease of calibration through communications
  31. 31. What’s new in Std C37.102-20056.2.1 Protective Functions• 87G – Generator Phase Differential• 87GN – Generator Ground Differential• 59G Stator Ground• 100% Stator Ground – 27TH - Third Harmonic Neutral Undervoltage – 59TH – Third Harmonic Voltage Ratio or Differential – 64S – Sub-harmonic Voltage Injection• 46 – Current Unbalance/Negative Sequence
  32. 32. What’s new in Std C37.102-2005• 24 – Overexcitation• 27 – Undervoltage• 59 – Overvoltage• 81U – Underfrequency• 81O – Overfrequency• 32 – Reverse Power or Directional Power• 49 – Thermal Protection• 51 – Overcurrent• 51VC/51VR or 21 – System Backup
  33. 33. What’s new in Std C37.102-2005• 60 – Loss of Voltage• 78 – Out-of-Step• 64F – Field Ground• Additional functions that may be provided include: • Sequential Trip Logic • Accidental Energization • Open Breaker Detection
  34. 34. What’s new in Std C37.102-2005• 60 – Loss of Voltage• 78 – Out-of-Step• 64F – Field Ground• Additional functions that may be provided include: – Sequential Trip Logic – Accidental Energization – Open Breaker Detection
  35. 35. Small Machine Protection IEEE “Buff Book” Small – up to 1 MW to 600V, 500 kVA if >600V
  36. 36. Medium Machine Protection IEEE “Buff Book” Medium – up to 12.5 MW
  37. 37. Large Machine Protection IEEE “Buff Book” Large – up to 50 MW
  38. 38. Large Machine Protection IEEE C37.102-1995 Larger than 50 MW
  39. 39. Large Machine Protection IEEE C37.102-2006
  40. 40. Relay Beckwith M-3425A CT 50 50 BFPh DT Programmable I/O VT Metering 87 52 Sequence of Events 25 Gen Logging VT Waveform Capture 81R 81 27 59 24 User Interface with PC 3Vo VT Communications (MODBUS, Ethernet) M-3921 + On Board HMI 67N - LED Targets 64F 64BThis function is available as astandard protective function. 27This function is available as aoptional protective function. 60FL 21 78 32 51V 40 50/27 51T 46 50 CTThis function provides control forthe function to which it points.NOTE: Some functions aremutually exclusive; seeInstruction Book for details. VT CT 87 50 50N 51N 27 27 GD BFN 59D 59N R 32 TN R High-impedance Grounding with Third Low-impedance Grounding with Harmonic 100% Ground Fault Protection Overcurrent Stator Ground Fault Protection
  41. 41. IEEE Devices used in Generator Protection No. DESCRIPTION 21 Phase Distance protection 24 Overexcitation / Volts per Hertz protection 25 Sync-check 27 Phase Undervoltage protection 100% Stator Ground Fault protection using 3rd Harmonic 27TN Undervoltage Differential 32R Reverse Power protection32F, 32LF Overpower, Low Forward protection 40 Loss of Field protection 46 Negative sequence overcurrent protection
  42. 42. IEEE Devices used in Generator Protection No. DESCRIPTION 50 Instantaneous AC Overcurrent protection 50DT Split Phase Differential protection 50/27 Inadvertent Generator Energizing protection 50BF Breaker Failure 51 AC Inverse Time Overcurrent protection Inverse Time Overcurrent protection with Voltage 51V Control/Restraint 59 Overvoltage protection 100% Stator Ground Fault protection using 3rd 59D Harmonic Voltage Comparison 60FL VT Fuse-loss detection and blocking
  43. 43. IEEE Devices used in Generator Protection No. DESCRIPTION 64F Field Ground protection 64B Brush Lift-Off Detection 64S 100% Stator Ground Protection by Low Frequency Injection 67N AC Directional Neutral Overcurrent protection 78 Out-of-step protection 81 Over/Under Frequency protection 81R Rate of Change Frequency protection 87 Generator Phase Differential protection87GD Ground Differential protection
  44. 44. Distance Protection (21)
  45. 45. Distance ProtectionDistance relaying with mho characteristics is commonly usedfor system phase-fault backup.These relays are usually connected to receive currents fromcurrent transformers in the neutral ends of the generatorphase windings and potential from the terminals of thegenerator.If there is a delta grounded-wye step-up transformer betweenthe generator and the system, special care must be taken inselecting the distance relay and in applying the propercurrents and potentials so that these relays see correctimpedances for system faults.
  46. 46. Phase Distance (21)• Phase distance backup protection may be prone to tripping on stable swings and load encroachment - Employ three zones • Z1 can be set to reach 80% of impedance of GSU for 87G back-up. • Z2 can be set to reach 120% of GSU for station bus backup, or to overreach remote bus for system fault back up protection. Load encroachment blinder provides security against high loads with long reach settings. • Z3 may be used in conjunction with Z2 to form out-of-step blocking logic for security on power swings or to overreach remote bus for system fault back up protection. Load encroachment blinder provides security against high loads with long reach settings. - Current threshold provides security against loss of potential (machine off line)
  47. 47. 3-Zone 21 Function with OSB/Load Encroachment
  48. 48. 21 – Distance element Fault Load (for Z1, Z2, Z3) Impendance Blinder +X XL Z3 XT Z2 Z1 -R +R -X Power Swing oror Power SwingZ1, Z2 and Z3 used to trip Load Encroachment Load EncraochmentZ1 set to 80% of GSU, Z2 set to 120% of GSUZ3 set to overreach remote bus
  49. 49. 21 – Distance Element Fault Load (for Z1 & Z2) Impendance Blinder +X XL Z3 XT Z2 Z1 -R +R -X Pow er Sw ing orZ1 and Z2 used to trip Load EncraochmentZ1 set to 80% of GSU, Z2 set to overreach remote busZ3 used for power swing blocking; Z3 blocks Z2
  50. 50. Distance ProtectionSettings summary per IEEE C37.102-2005 Zone-1 = the smaller of the two following criteria: 1. 120% of unit transformer 2. 80% of Zone 1 reach setting of the line relay on the shortest line (neglecting in-feed); Time = 0.5 s Zone-2 = the smaller of the three following criteria: A. 120% of longest line (with in-feed). B. 50% to 66.7% of load impedance (200% to 150% of the generator capability curve) at the RPF C. 80% to 90% of load impedance (125% to 111% of the generator capability curve) at the maximum torque angle; Zone-2 < 2Z maxload @ RPF Time > 60 cycles
  51. 51. Distance Protection
  52. 52. Overexcitation/ Volts per Hertz (24)
  53. 53. Overexcitation/Volts per HertzPHYSICAL INSIGHTS• As voltage rises above rating leakage flux increases• Leakage flux induces current in transformer support structure causing rapid localized heating.
  54. 54. Overexcitation/ Volts per Hertz GENERATOR Voltage V TRANSFORMER ≈ Freq. Hz EXCITATIONGENERATOR LIMITS (ANSI C 50.13) Full Load V/Hz = 1.05 pu No Load V/Hz = 1.05 puTRANSFORMER LIMITS Full Load V/Hz = 1.05 pu (HVTerminals) No Load V/Hz = 1.10 pu (HV Terminals)
  55. 55. Overexcitation/Volts per Hertz Typical Curves
  56. 56. Overexcitation/Volts per Hertz Example of inverse volts/hertz setting
  57. 57. Overexcitation/ Volts per HertzSettings summary per IEEE C37.102 Single relay: PU = 110% p.u. time = 6 s Two stages relay: alarm pu = 110%; 45< t < 60 s trip pu = 118% - 120%, 2< t < 6s
  58. 58. Overexcitation/Volts per Hertz Overfluxing Capability, Diagram 3Siemens V84.3 165 MW Generator 12/1/94 MET-ED, FPC
  59. 59. Synchronizing (25)
  60. 60. SynchronizingImproper synchronizing of a generator to a system may resultin damage to the generator step-up transformer and any typeof generating unit.The damage incurred may be slipped couplings, increasedshaft vibration, a change in bearing alignment, loosenedstator windings, loosened stator laminations and fatiguedamage to shafts and other mechanical parts.In order to avoid damaging a generator during synchronizing,the generator manufacturer will generally providesynchronizing limits in terms of breaker closing angle andvoltage matching.
  61. 61. SynchronizingSettings summary per IEEE C37.102 Breaker closing angle: within ± 10 elect. degrees Voltage matching: 0 to +5% Frequency difference < 0.067 Hz
  62. 62. Undervoltage (27)
  63. 63. UndervoltageGenerators are usually designed to operate continuouslyat a minimum voltage of 95% of its rated voltage, whiledelivering rated power at rated frequency.Operating generator with terminal voltage lower than95% of its rated voltage may result in undesirable effectssuch as reduction in stability limit, import of excessivereactive power from the grid to which it is connected,and malfunctioning of voltage sensitive devices andequipment.
  64. 64. UndervoltageSettings summary per IEEE C37.102Relays with inverse time characteristic and instantaneous PU : 90%Vn; t= 9.0 s at 90% of PU setting Inst : 80% VnRelays with definite time characteristic and two stages Alarm PU : 90%Vn; 10< t < 15 s Trip PU : 80% Vn; time: 2s
  65. 65. Reverse Power (32)
  66. 66. Reverse PowerPrevents generator from motoring on loss of prime moverFrom a system standpoint, motoring is defined as the flow ofreal power into the generator acting as a motor.With current in the field winding, the generator will remain insynchronism with the system and act as a synchronousmotor.If the field breaker is opened, the generator will act as aninduction motor.A power relay set to look into the machine is therefore usedon most units.The sensitivity and setting of the relay is dependent uponthe type of prime mover involved.
  67. 67. Reverse PowerSettings summary per IEEE C37.102Pickup setting should be below the following motoringlimits: Gas : 50% rated power; time < 60 s Diesel : 25% rated power; time < 60 s Hydro turbines : 0.2% - 2% rated power; time < 60 s Steam turbines : 0.5% - 3% rated power; time < 30 s
  68. 68. Sequential TrippingUsed on steam turbine generators to preventoverspeedRecommended by manufacturers of steam turbinegenerators as a result of field experienceThis trip mode used only for boiler/reactor orturbine mechanical problemsElectrical protection should not trip through thismode
  69. 69. Sequential TrippingSTEP 1 Abnormal turbine/boiler/reactor condition is detectedSTEP 2 Turbine valves are closed; generator allowed to briefly “motor” (I.e., take in power)STEP 3 A reverse power (32) relay in series with turbine valves position switches confirms all valves have closedSTEP 4 Generator is separated from power system
  70. 70. Sequential Tripping Logic
  71. 71. Sequential Tripping ProblemCONSIDER High MVArs (out) Low MW (in) E-M relay can be fooled
  72. 72. Loss-of-Field (40)
  73. 73. Loss of FieldCAUSES• Field open circuit• Field short circuit• Accidental tripping of field breaker• Regulator control failure• Loss of main exciter
  74. 74. Loss of Field
  75. 75. Transformation from KW-KVAR plot to R-X PlotMachine Capability Curve R-X Plot
  76. 76. Loss of FieldLoss of Field Impedance Characteristics
  77. 77. Loss of FieldSettings summary per IEEE C37.102 UNIT 1Offset: Xd/2; Diameter: 1.0 pu; time: 0.1 s UNIT 2Offset: Xd/2; Diameter: Xd; time: 0.5 to 0.6 s
  78. 78. Loss of FieldProtective Approach # 1
  79. 79. Loss of FieldProtective Approach # 2
  80. 80. Graphical Method For Steady-state StabilityThe Steady-State Stability limit can be a significant limit that should be related to both themachine capability curve (MW-MVAR Plot) and the loss-of-field (40) relay operatingcharacteristics (R-X Diagram Plot). In the figures below, V is the per-unit terminal generatorvoltage, XT and Xs the per-unit Generator Step Up (GSU) transformer and system impedancesrespectively as viewed from the generator terminals. Xd is the per-unit unsaturated synchronousreactance of the generator. All reactances should be placed on the generator MVA base.
  81. 81. Negative Sequence (46)
  82. 82. Negative Sequence• Unbalanced phase currents create negative sequence current in generator stator• Negative sequence current interacts with normal positive sequence current to induce a double frequency current (120 Hz)• Current (120 Hz) is induced into rotor causing surface heating• Generator has established short-time rating, l22t=K where K=Manufacturer Factor (the larger the generator the smaller the K value)
  83. 83. Negative Sequence Settings summary per IEEE C37.102 PERMISSIBLE l2 TYPE OF GENERATOR PERCENT OF STATOR RATINGSalient Pole With connected amortisseur windings 10 With non-connected amortisseur windings 5Cylindrical Rotor Indirectly cooled 10 Directly cooled to 960 MVA 8 961 to 1200 MVA 6 1200 to 1500 MVA 5†These values also express the negative-phase –sequence current capabilityat reduced generator KVA capabilities.‡ The short time (unbalanced fault) negative sequence capability of agenerator is also defined in ANSI C50.13.
  84. 84. Negative SequenceType of Generator Permissible l22tSalient pole generator 40Synchronous condenser 30Cylindrical rotor generators Indirectly cooled 30 Directly cooled (0-800 MVA) 10 Directly cooled (801-1600 MVA) see curve below (VALUES TAKEN FROM ANSI C50.13-1989)
  85. 85. Split PhaseDifferential (50DT)
  86. 86. Split-Phase Differential• Most turbine generators have single turn stator windings. If a generator has stator windings with multiturn coils and with two or more circuits per phase, the split-phase relaying scheme may be used to provide turn fault protection.• In this scheme, the circuits in each phase of the stator winding are split into two equal groups and the currents of each group are compared.• A difference in these currents indicates an unbalance caused by a single turn fault.
  87. 87. Split-Phase Differential • Scheme detects turn to turn fault not involving ground. • Generator must have two or more windings per phase to apply scheme. • Used widely on salient-pole hydro generators. Used on some steam generators. • Difference between current on each phase indicates a turn to turn fault. • Need to have separate pick-up levels on each phase to accommodate practice of removal of shorted terms.
  88. 88. Typical Split-Phase Differential Using Window CT’s
  89. 89. Split-phase protection using a single window current transformer Settings summary per IEEE C37.102 The pickup of the instantaneous unit must be set above CT error currents that may occur during external faults.
  90. 90. Inadvertent Off-Line Generator Protection (50/27)
  91. 91. Why Inadvertent Energizing Occurs • Operating errors • Breaker head flashover • Control circuit malfunctions • Combination of above
  92. 92. Inadvertent Energizing ProtectionInadvertent energizing is a serious industry problemDamage occurs within secondsConventional generator protection will notprovide protection- marginal in detecting the event- disabled when machine is inadvertently energized- operates too slowly to prevent damageNeed to install dedicated protection scheme
  93. 93. Generator Response and Damage to Three-Phase Energizing Generator behaves as an induction motor Rotating flux induced into the generator rotor Resulting rotor current is forced into negative sequence path in rotor body Machine impedance during initial energizing is equivalent to its negative sequence impedance Rapid rotor heating occurs l2t = K
  94. 94. Inadvertent Energizing Equivalent Circuit
  95. 95. Response of Conventional GeneratorProtection to Inadvertent Energizing Some relays may detect inadvertent generator energizing but can: Be marginal in their ability to detect the condition Operate too slowly to prevent damage Many times conventional protection is disabled when the unit is off-line Removal of AC potential transformer fuses or links Removal of D.C. control power Auxiliary contact (52a) of breaker of switches can disable tripping
  96. 96. Dedicated Protection Schemes to Detect Inadvertent Energizing Frequency supervised overcurrent scheme Voltage supervised overcurrent scheme Directional overcurrent scheme Impedance relays scheme Auxiliary contact enabled overcurrent scheme
  97. 97. Inadvertent Energizing Protection *Positive Sequence Voltage
  98. 98. Inadvertent Energizing ProtectionSettings summary per IEEE C37.102 50: P.U ≤ 50% of the worst-case current value andshould be < 125% generator rated current. 27: 70% Vn, time: 1.5 s
  99. 99. Generator Circuit Breaker Failure (50BF)
  100. 100. Generator Circuit Breaker FailureIf a breaker does not clear the fault or abnormal condition in aspecified time, the timer will trip the necessary breakers toremove the generator from the system.To initiate the breaker-failure timer, a protective relay mustoperate and a current detector or a breaker "a" switch mustindicate that the breaker has failed to open, as shown in theFigure.
  101. 101. Generator Circuit Breaker Failure Functional diagram of alternate generator breaker failure scheme
  102. 102. Generator Circuit Breaker FailureSettings summary per IEEE C37.102 Current detector PU: should be more sensitive than the lowest current present during fault involving currents. Timer: > Gen breaker interrupting time + Current detector dropout time + safety margin
  103. 103. Overcurrent Protection (50/51)
  104. 104. Overcurrent ProtectionIn some instances, generator overload protection may beprovided through the use of a torque controlled overcurrentrelay that is coordinated with the ANSI C50.13-2004 short-time capability curveThis relay consists of an instantaneous overcurrent unit anda time overcurrent unit having an extremely inversecharacteristic.An overload alarm may be desirable to give the operator anopportunity to reduce load in an orderly manner.This alarm should not give nuisance alarms for externalfaults and should coordinate with the generator overloadprotection if this protection is provided.
  105. 105. Overcurrent ProtectionTurbine-generator short-time thermal capability for balanced 3-phase loading (From ANSI C50.13-2004)
  106. 106. Overcurrent ProtectionSettings summary per IEEE C37.102 51PU: 75-100% FLC, time: 7 s at 226% FLC. Where FLC: full load current. 50PU: 115% FLC, time: instantaneous Dropout: 95% of 50PU or higher
  107. 107. Voltage Controlled or VoltageRestrained Time Overcurrent (51 V)
  108. 108. Voltage Controlled or Voltage Restrained Time OvercurrentFaults close to generator terminals may result in voltagedrop and fault current reduction, especially if the generatorsare isolated and the faults are severe.Therefore, in generation protection it is important to havevoltage control on the overcurrent time-delay units to ensureproper operation and co-ordination.These devices are used to improve the reliability of the relayby ensuring that it operates before the generator currentbecomes too low.There are two types of overcurrent relays with this feature –voltage-controlled and voltage-restrained, which aregenerally referred to as type 51V relays.
  109. 109. Voltage Controlled or Voltage Restrained Time OvercurrentThe voltage-controlled (51/27C) feature allows the relays tobe set below rated current, and operation is blocked untilthe voltage falls well below normal voltage.The voltage-controlled approach typically inhibits operationuntil the voltage drops below a pre-set value.It should be set to function below about 80% of ratedvoltage with a current pick-up of about 50% of generatorrated current.
  110. 110. Voltage Controlled or Voltage Restrained Time OvercurrentThe voltage-restrained (51/27R)feature causes the pick-up todecrease with reducing voltage, asshown in Figure.For example, the relay can be setfor 175% of generator rated currentwith rated voltage applied. At 25%voltage the relay picks up at 25% ofthe relay setting (1.75 × 0.25 = 0.44times rated).The varying pick-up level makes itmore difficult to co-ordinate the relaywith other fixed pick-up overcurrentrelays.
  111. 111. Voltage Controlled or Voltage Restrained Time OvercurrentSettings summary per IEEE C37.102Voltage Controlled: Overcurrent PU: 50% FLC Control voltage: 75%VNOM. Inverse time curve and dial settings should be set to coordinate with system line relays for close-in faults on the transmission lines at the plant.Voltage Restrained: Overcurrent PU: 150% FLC at rated voltage Inverse time curve and dial settings should be set to coordinate with system line relays for close-in faults on the transmission lines at the plant.
  112. 112. Overvoltage (59)
  113. 113. OvervoltageGenerator overvoltage may occur without necessarilyexceeding the V/Hz limits of the machine.Protection for generator overvoltage is provided witha frequency-compensated (or frequency insensitive)overvoltage relay.The relay should have both an instantaneous unitand a time delay unit with an inverse timecharacteristic.Two definite time delay relays can also be applied.
  114. 114. OvervoltageSettings summary per IEEE C37.102Relays with inverse time characteristic and instantaneous PU : 110%Vn; t= 2.5 s at 140% of PU setting Inst : 130 - 150% VnRelays with definite time characteristic and two stages Alarm PU : 110%Vn; 10< t < 15 s Trip PU : 150% Vn; time: 2s
  115. 115. 100% Stator Ground (59N/27TH)
  116. 116. Stator Ground ProtectionProvides protection for stator ground fault on generators whichare high impedance groundedUsed on unit connected generatorsGround current limited to about 10A primaryProvides 100% stator ground protection (entire winding) High Impedance Grounding
  117. 117. 3rd Harmonic Comparator for 100% Stator Ground Fault Protection • 3rd harmonic levels change with position of ground fault and loading • Using a comparator technique of 3rd harmonic voltages at line and neutral ends allows an overvoltage element to be applied
  118. 118. 100% Stator Ground Fault (59N/27TN) Third-Harmonic Undervoltage Ground-Fault Protection Scheme
  119. 119. Stator GroundSettings summary per IEEE C37.102 59G element: Pickup = 5 V; t = 5 s Note: Time setting must be selected to provide coordination with other system protective devices. 27TH element: Pickup = 50% of minimum normal generator 3rd harmonic. t = 5 s
  120. 120. Field Ground (64F)
  121. 121. Field (Rotor) Ground Fault ProtectionThe field circuit of a generator is an ungrounded system.As such, a single ground fault will not generally affect theoperation of a generator.However, if a second ground fault occurs, a portion of thefield winding will be short circuited, thereby producingunbalanced air gap fluxes in the machine.These unbalanced fluxes may cause rotor vibration thatmay quickly damage the machine; also, unbalanced rotorwinding and rotor body temperatures caused by unevenrotor winding currents may cause similar damagingvibrations.
  122. 122. Field (Rotor) Ground Fault Protection The probability of the second ground occurring is greater than the first, since the first ground establishes a ground reference for voltages induced in the field by stator transients, thereby increasing the stress to ground at other points on the field winding. On a brushless excitation system continuous monitoring for field ground is not possible with conventional field ground relays since the generator field connections are contained in the rotating element. Insurance companies consider this is the most frequent internal generator fault Review existing 64F voltage protection methods
  123. 123. Typical Generator Field CircuitA single field ground fault will not: affect the operation of a generator produce any immediate damaging effects
  124. 124. Typical Generator Field Circuit Ground #1The first ground fault will: establish a ground reference making a second ground fault more likely increase stress to ground at other points in field winding
  125. 125. Typical Generator Field Circuit Ground #1 Ground #2The second ground fault will: short out part of field winding causing unit vibrations cause rotor heating from unbalanced currents cause arc damage at the points of fault
  126. 126. Detection Using a DC Source A dc voltage source in series with an overvoltage relay coil is connected between the negative side of the generator field winding and ground. A ground anywhere in the field will cause the relay to operate.
  127. 127. Detection Using a Voltage Divider This method uses a voltage divider and a sensitive overvoltage relay between the divider midpoint and ground. A maximum voltage is impressed on the relay by a ground on either the positive or negative side of the field circuit.This generator field ground relay is designed to overcome thenull problem by using a nonlinear resistor (varistor) in series withone of the two linear resistors in the voltage divider.
  128. 128. Detection Using Pilot BrushesThe addition of a pilot brush or brushes is to gain access tothe rotating field parts.Normally this is not done since eliminating the brushes is oneof the advantages of a brushless system.A ground fault shorts out the field winding to rotorcapacitance, CR, which unbalances the bridge circuit.If a voltage is read across the 64F relay, then a ground existsDetection systems may be used to detect field grounds if acollector ring is provided on the rotating shaft along with apilot brush that may be periodically dropped to monitor thesystem.
  129. 129. Detection Using Pilot Brushes The brushes used in this scheme are not suitable for continuouscontact with the collector rings.
  130. 130. Field Ground Detection for Brushless Machines LED Communications
  131. 131. Field Ground Detection for Brushless Machines with Infrared LED CommunicationsThe relays transmitter is mounted on the generator fielddiode wheel.Its source of power is the ac brushless exciter system. Twoleads are connected to the diode bridge circuit of the rotatingrectifier to provide this power.Ground detection is obtained by connecting one lead of thetransmitter to thenegative bus of the field rectifier and theground lead to the rotor shaft.Sensing current is determined by the field ground resistanceand the location of a fault with respect to the positive andnegative bus.
  132. 132. Field Ground Detection for Brushless Machines with Infrared LED Communications The transmitter Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) emit light fornormal conditions. The receivers infrared detectors sense the light signalfrom the LED across the air gap. Upon detection of a fault, the LEDs are turned off. Loss ofLED light to the receiver will actuate the ground relay andinitiate a trip or alarm
  133. 133. Using Injection Voltage Signal
  134. 134. Using Injection Voltage Signal In addition, digital relays may provide real-time monitoringof actual insulation resistance so deterioration with time maybe monitored. The passive coupling network is used to isolate high dc fieldvoltages from the relay. Backup protection for the above described schemes usuallyconsists of vibration detecting equipment. Contacts are provided to trip the main and field breakers ifvibration is above that associated with normal short circuittransients for faults external to the unit.
  135. 135. Field (Rotor) Ground Fault ProtectionSettings summary per IEEE C37.102 Field ground detection using DC a source: 1< t <3 s Field ground detection for Brushless Machines with infrared LED communications: time up to 10 s Field ground detection using low frequency square wave voltage injection: ALARM = 20 kΩ TRIP = 5 kΩ
  136. 136. Generator Out-Of-Step Protection (OSP) (78)
  137. 137. When is OSP needed?1. When critical switching times are short enough to warrant concern that backup clearing of a system fault could exceed critical switching time.2. This swing locus passes through the generator or GSU3. Credible loss of transmission lines could result in high transfer reactance between the generator and the power system
  138. 138. BackgroundPower system stability enables the synchronousmachines of a system to respond to a disturbance suchas transmission system faults, sudden load changes,loss of generating units or line switching.Loss of synchronism is produced when the angle of theEMF of a machine increases to a level that does notallow any recovery of the plant when the machine is saidto have reached a slip.Transient stability studies allow to determine if thesystem will remain in synchronism following majordisturbance
  139. 139. OST & PSB Functions• During power system disturbances, the voltage and current which feed the relays vary with time and, as a result, the relays will also see an impedance that is varying with time.• Certain power system disturbances may cause loss of synchronism between a generator and the rest of the utility system, or between neighboring utility interconnected power systems.• If such a loss of synchronism occurs, it is imperative that the generator or system areas operating asynchronously are separated immediately through controlled islanding of the power system using out-of-step protection systems-OST.• OST systems must be complemented with Power Swing Blocking (PSB) of distance relay elements prone to operate during unstable power swings. PSB prevents system separation from occurring at any locations other than the pre-selected ones.
  140. 140. Power Transfer Equation V S x VR P= Sinδ X
  141. 141. Two-Machine SystemP VS & VR 90° Constant δ V S x VR P= Sinδ X
  142. 142. Effect of Faults on Power Transfer B e fo re F au lt F au lty L in eP e r U n it T o rqu e o r P ow e r S w itc he d O u t L -G F a u lt L -L F au lt T0 L -L -G F au lt 3 ø F au l t 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 1 00 110 120 130 140 1 5 0 160 1 70 180 A ng u lar D isp lace m en t in D eg rees
  143. 143. Network with Three Phase Fault S R S A 3∅ B RVS VR‘ Fault nP
  144. 144. Power Transfer Curve U Before Fault Line A-B Open K Final Operating Steady State Load Point J Requirements and II Mechanical Input Initial To GeneratorsTransmitted Power Operating Point P D L I A Breaker Open B Breaker Closed During 3 ∅ Fault H N G A and B F Breakers Closed E 45 90 135 180 Angle m
  145. 145. Power Transfer Curve• Ways the protection system can mitigate the affect of the fault on power swings.• Fast clearing• Pilot systems• Breaker failure systems• Single pole tripping• High speed reclosing• Load shedding
  146. 146. Impedances Seen by Relays
  147. 147. Impedances Seen by Relays δ
  148. 148. Impedances Seen by Relays δ
  149. 149. Basics of Power Swing Blocking R X B VR IS Q Increase in δS when V S = VR ZL δS O VA / I S A R VS VS S IS Impedance seen by the relay
  150. 150. Basics of Power Swing Blocking Power oscillation with Vs >V r Measuring unit Zone 3 Zone 2Blocking relaycharacteristic Load characteristic
  151. 151. Basics of Out of Step Protection• The Out-of-Step function (78) is used to protect the generator from out-of-step or pole slip conditions.• There are different ways to implement Out of Step Protection.• One of the commonest types uses one set of blinders, along with a supervisory MHO element.
  152. 152. Basics of Out of Step Protection•The pickup area is restricted to the shaded area, defined by theinner region of the MHO circle, the region to the right of theblinder A and the region to the left of blinder B.
  153. 153. Basics of Out of Step ProtectionFor operation of the blinder scheme : The positive sequence impedance must originate outside either blinder A or B, It should swing through the pickup area and progress to the opposite blinder from where the swing had originated. The swing time should be greater than the time delay settingWhen this scenario happens, the tripping circuit is complete. Thecontact will remain closed for the amount of time set by the seal-intimer delay.
  154. 154. Generator Out-of-Step Protection (OSP) Unstable Stable X ’d XT XS
  155. 155. Setting of 78 Relays X D A B SYSTEM X maxSG1 O1.5 X TG TRANS XTG P δ R O M Swing Locus GEN X´d MHO 2X´d ELEMENT d A B ELEMENT ELEMENT PICK-UP PICK-UP C BLINDER ELEMENTS
  156. 156. Setting of 78 RelaysSettings summary per IEEE C37.102-2005 Mho Diameter : 2Xd + 1.5 XTG d = ((Xd + XTG + XmaxSG1)/2) x tan (90-(δ/2))where d: Blinder distance δ: angular separation between generator and the system which the relay determines instability. If there is not stability study available δ = 120º t = as per transient stability studytypically 40 < t < 100 ms
  157. 157. Frequency (81)
  158. 158. Frequency The operation of generators at abnormal frequencies(either overfrequency or underfrequency) generally resultsfrom full or partial load rejection or from overloading of thegenerator. Load rejection will cause the generator to overspeed andoperate at some frequency above normal Steam and gas turbines are more limited or restrictive toabnormal frequency than hydrogenerators. At some point abnormal frequency may impact turbineblades and result in damage to the bearings due to vibration.
  159. 159. FrequencySettings summary per IEEE C37.102It is important to consult turbine manufacturer and get turbineoff frequency operating curves or limitsUnder frequency: 81U ALARM: 59.5 Hz time: 10 s 81U TRIP :The generator 81U relay should be set below the pick-up ofunder frequency load shedding relay set-point and above theoff frequency operating limits of steam turbine.Over frequency: 81O ALARMPick-up: 60.6 Hz, Time Delay 5 sec.
  160. 160. Phase Differential (87)
  161. 161. Phase DifferentialFast response time (under 1 – ½ cycle)Percentage differential with adjustable slope
  162. 162. Phase DifferentialSettings summary per IEEE C37.102 PU : 0.3 A Slope1 : 10% time: Instantaneous
  163. 163. Typical Settings of Generator Relays Table 1 - Recommended Settings Per IEEE C37.102IEEE No. FUNCTION SECTION DESCRIPTION Zone-1 = smaller of the two following criteria: 1. 120% of unit transformer 2. 80% of Zone 1 reach setting of the line relay on the shortest line (neglecting in-feed); time = 0.5 s Zone-2 = the smaller of the three following criteria: A. 120% of longest line (with in-feed). If the unit is connected to a breaker and a half bus, this 21 Distance A.2.3 would be the length of the adjacent line. B. 50% to 66.7% of load impedance (200% to 150% of the generator capability curve) at the RPFA C. 80% to 90% of load impedance (125% to 111% of the generator capability curve) at the maximum torque angle; time > 60 cycles Zone-2 < 2Z maxload @ RPF Single relay: PU = 110% p.u. time = 6 s 24 Overexcitation 4.5.4.2 Two stages relay: alarm pu = 110%; 45< t < 60 s trip pu = 118% - 120%, 2< t < 6s Breaker closing angle: within ± 10 elect. Degrees 25 Sync-check 5.7 Voltage matching: 0 to +5% Frequency difference < 0.067 Hz Relays with inverse time charac and instantaneous PU : 90%Vn; t= 9.0 s at 90% of PU setting Inst : 80% Vn 27 Undervoltage A.2.13 Relays with definite time charac and 2 stages Alarm PU : 90%Vn; 10< t < 15 s Trip PU : 80% Vn; time: 2s
  164. 164. Typical Settings of Generator Relays Table 1 - Recommended Settings Per IEEE C37.102IEEE No. FUNCTION SECTION DESCRIPTION Pickup setting should be below the following motoring limits: 4.5.5.3 & Gas : 50% rated power; time < 60 s 32 Reverse Power A.2.9 Diesel : 25% rated power; time < 60 s Hydro turbines : 0.2% - 2% rated power; time < 60 s Steam turbines : 0.5% - 3% rated power; time < 30 s UNIT 1 Offset: Xd/2; Diameter: 1.0 pu; time: 0.1 s 40 Loss-of-field 4.5.1.3 UNIT 2 Offset: Xd/2; Diameter: Xd; time: 0.5 to 0.6 s Pickup setting should be below the permissible I2 percent expressed in percent of rated current, which are indicated below: Salient pole w/connected amortisseur windings: 10% Salient pole non-connected amortisseur windings: 5% Cylindrical rotor indirectly cooled: 10% Directly cooled up to 960 MVA: 8% Negative Sequence 46 4.5.2 Directly cooled 961 to 1200 MVA: 6% Overcurrent Directly cooled 961 to 1200 MVA: 6% Directly cooled 1201 to 1500 MVA: 5% Permissible K (I22 x t) Salient pole generator: 40 Synchronous condenser: 30 Cylindrical rotor indirectly cooled: 30 Directly cooled: 10
  165. 165. Typical Settings of Generator Relays Table 1 - Recommended Settings Per IEEE C37.102 IEEE No. FUNCTION SECTION DESCRIPTION Differential via flux summation The pickup of the instantaneous unit must be set above 50/87 4.3.2.5.1 CT error currents that may occur during external faults. CTs or split-phase protection Inadvertent Energization 50: P.U ≤ 50% of the worst-case current value and 50/27 Overcurrent with 27, 81 A.2.4 should be < 125% generator rated current. Supervision 27: 70% Vn, time: 1.5 s Current detector PU: should be more sensitive than the Generator Breaker Failure lowest current present during fault involving currents. 50 BF A.2.11 Timer > Gen breaker int time + Curr det. dropout time + Protection safety margin 51N Stator Ground Over-current (Low,Med Z Gnd,Phase CT Residual) Stator Ground Over-current 50/51N (Low, Med Z Gnd, Neutral CT or Flux Summation CT) Stator Ground Over-current51GN, 51N (High Z Gnd)
  166. 166. Typical Settings of Generator Relays Table 1 - Recommended Settings Per IEEE C37.102 IEEE No. FUNCTION SECTION DESCRIPTION 51PU: 75-100% FLC, time: 7 s at 226% FLC. FLC Time overcurrent protection 50/51 4.1.1.2 means full load current. (against overloads) 50PU: 115% FLC, time: instantaneous Overcurrent PU: 50% FLC Control voltage: 75%VNOM. 51VC Voltage Controlled Overcurrent A.2.6 Inverse time curve and dial settings should be set to coordinate with system line relays for close-in faults on the transmission lines at the plant. Overcurrent PU: 150% FLC at rated voltage Inverse time curve and dial settings should be set to 51VR Voltage Restrained Overcurrent A.2.6 coordinate with system line relays for close-in faults on the transmission lines at the plant. Relays with inverse time charac and instantaneous PU : 110%Vn; t= 2.5 s at 140% of PU setting 4.5.6. & Inst : 130 - 150% Vn 59 Overvoltage A.2.12 Relays with definite time charac and 2 stages Alarm PU : 110%Vn; 10< t < 15 s Trip PU : 150% Vn; time: 2s 59G element: Pickup = 5 V; t = 5 s 59N, 100% Stator Gound protection 4.3.3.1.1 & Time setting must be selected to provide coordination (for high impedance grounding with other system protective devices.27-TH, 59P A.2.7 generators) 27TH element: Pickup = 50% of minimum normal generator 3rd harmonic, time = 5 s
  167. 167. Typical Settings of Generator Relays Table 1 - Recommended Settings Per IEEE C37.102IEEE No. FUNCTION SECTION DESCRIPTION Field ground detection using DC a source: 1< t <3 s Field ground detection for Brushless Machines with Generator Rotor Field infrared LED communications: time up to 10 s 64F protection 4.4 Field ground detection using low frequency suare wave (rotor ground faults) voltage injection: ALARM = 20 kOhm TRIP = 5 kOhm Directional O/C for Inadvertent 67IE Energization Mho Diameter : 2Xd + 1.5 XTG Blinder distance (d) = ((Xd + XTG + XmaxSG1)/2) x tan (90-(d/2)); d: angular separation between generator and the 78 Out of Step A.2.2 system which the relay determines instability. If there is not stability study available d = 120º t = as per transient stability study Typically 40 < t < 100 ms 81U ALARM: 59.5 Hz time: 10 s 81U TRIP: The generator 81U relay should be set below the pick- Over/under frequency 81 A.2.14 up of underfrequency load shedding relay set-point and (60 Hz systems) above the off frequency operating limits of steam turbine. 81O ALARM:Pick-up: 60.6 Hz, Time Delay 5 sec.
  168. 168. Typical Settings of Generator Relays Table 1 - Recommended Settings Per IEEE C37.102IEEE No. FUNCTION SECTION DESCRIPTION PU : 0.3 A 87G Generator Phase Differential A.2.5 Slope : 10% time: instantaneous87GN Generator Ground Differential87UD Unit Differential
  169. 169. Types Of Data• Metering• Function Status• Breaker Monitoring• Fault Reporting• Oscillography• Testing
  170. 170. Metering
  171. 171. Function Status
  172. 172. Phase Distance Monitor
  173. 173. Breaker Monitoring
  174. 174. Fault Reporting
  175. 175. Fault Reporting
  176. 176. Fault Reporting
  177. 177. Oscillography B C D E A F JG H I K L M N
  178. 178. A. All analog traces. This view shows peak values. RMS values may also be displayed.B. Controls for going to the beginning or end of a record, as well as nudging forward or backward in time in a recordC. Zoom controlsD. Display controls for analog traces, RMS traces, fundamental waveform display, frequency trace, power trace, power factor trace, phasor diagram, impedance diagram and power diagramE. Marker #1F. Marker #2G. Time at Marker #1H. Time at Marker #2I. Control status input and contact output traces (discrete I/O)J. Scaling for each analog trace. This can be set automatically or manually adjusted.K. Date and timestamp for recordL. Time of trip commandM. Time at Marker #1N. Time at Marker #2
  179. 179. OscillographyOP QR S
  180. 180. O. Drop down window for view selection, diagram selection and zoomP. Delta value between Marker #1 and Marker #2Q. Value at Marker #1R. Value at Marker #2S. Scaling for each analog trace. This can be set automatically or manually adjusted.
  181. 181. Waveform Capture: PQ Plot
  182. 182. Communications
  183. 183. Test Report GERS DATE BECHTEL LIMITED FEBRUARY 26 / 2004 TESTED BY: CONSULTING ENGINEERS TEST REPORT R. Bravo - C. QuinteroPROJECT : Meter and relay APROVED BY:test at Spalding Energy Project GENERATOR PROTECTION A.Tasama - G. WilliamsMANUFACTURER : BECKWITH PANEL TAG: LOCATION : SERIAL NUMBER : CIRCUIT : STG PROT. ATYPE: M-3425 GPR STG ELECT BUILDING 1815 SYSTEM: AC011. GENERAL SETTINGS Parameter Value Parameter ValueNominal Voltage [V] 120 V.T. Configuration L-G to L-LNominal Current [A] 3.98 Relay Seal-in Time [Cycles] 300Nominal Frequency [Hz] 50 V.T. Phase Ratio 200Phase Rotation ABC V.T. Neutral Ratio 100C.T. Secundary Rating [A] 5 C.T. Phase Ratio 2600Delta - Y Transformer Enable C.T. Neutral Ratio 252. READINGS CHECK Description Injected Theoretical Value Obtained Read % ErrorV RY [V] 120.0 24000 23960 -0.17%V YB [V] 120.0 24000 23940 -0.25%V BR [V] 120.0 24000 24020 0.08%I R [A] 5.0 13000 13005 0.04%I Y [A] 5.0 13000 13021 0.16%I B [A] 5.0 13000 13013 0.10%I r [A] 5.0 13000 13018 0.14%I y [A] 5.0 13000 13013 0.10%I b [A] 5.0 13000 13000 0.00%Active Power [W/MW] 900.0 468.00 466.36 -0.35%Reactive Power [VAr/MVAr] 519.6 270.20 275.21 1.85%Power Factor 0.87 0.87 0.86 -1.15%Frequency [Hz] 50.000 50.00 50.00 0.00%Note: IR, IY, IB = line side currents / Ir, Iy, Ib = generator side currents
  184. 184. Test Report16. FUNCTION 87. PHASE DIFFERENTIAL PROTECTION16.1. Settings Parameter ValueMinimum Operation current [A] 0.3Slope 10% Trip output 1Time Delay [Cycles] 1 Blocking input -16.2 Function Test Parameter Theoretical Value Result % Error IR 0.29 3.33%Minimum current for operation [A] 0.30 IY 0.29 3.33% IB 0.29 3.33%Slope 1 10.00% 10.53% 0.53%Slope 2 40.00% 40.00% 0.00%Operation Time [ms] 20.00 19.00 -5.00%Differential Characteristic TestLine current [A] - Fixed IR 0.29 3.00 5.00 7.00 10.50 13.00 15.00Theoretical Values Ir 0.00 2.70 4.52 6.33 7.00 8.67 10.00 Idiff = (IR-Ir) Idiff 0.29 0.30 0.48 0.67 3.50 4.33 5.00 Ibias = (IR+Ir)/2 Ibias 0.15 2.85 4.76 6.67 8.75 10.83 12.50Obtained values Ir 0.00 2.70 4.50 6.30 7.00 8.60 10.00 Idiff = (IR-Ir) Idiff 0.29 0.30 0.50 0.70 3.50 4.40 5.00 Ibias = (IR+Ir)/2 Ibias 0.15 2.85 4.75 6.65 8.75 10.80 12.50 6.0 Differential Current [A] 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Bias Current [A] Obtained Theoretical
  185. 185. Test Report3. FUNCTION 21. DISTANCE PROTECTION3.1. Settings Parameter ValueDiameter [Ohms] 8.50Offset [Ohms] -5.2Impedance Angle [Degrees] 85 Trip output 1Time delay [cycles] 50 Blocking input 1 & FL3.2 Function Test Parameter Theoretical Value Result % ErrorVoltage [V LN] Fixed 20 - -Current [A] Varied 6.06 5.99 1.17%Impedance [Ohms] Calculated 3.30 3.34 1.18%Operation time [s] 1.00 1.01 0.50%
  186. 186. Questions?jmgers@gersusa.com

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