2010 
 

             


       Lake Champlain 
       Saving the Lake 
        
       What part can Plattsburg NY ...
Lake Champlain             2 

 
          What is the major cause of the blue‐green algae blooms and what impact do they ...
Lake Champlain             3 

 
          Where is the excess Phosphorus coming from? 


Phosphorus comes from what is ca...
Lake Champlain             4 

 
          What are some challenges to reducing Phosphorus pollution? 


One of the bigges...
Lake Champlain               5 

 
           What are some measures that have been made to reduce Phosphorus counts n 
  ...
Lake Champlain            6 

 
          What are some steps that the leaders of Plattsburg and Burlington can do to 
   ...
Lake Cha
                                                                                       amplain               7 

...
Lake Champlain             8 

 
    Here are some useful graphs 




                                                    ...
Lake Champlain         9 

 




                                 


    Being Green Pays | Confidential 


 
Lake Champlain         10 

 
         References 


http://www.clf.org/work/CWHF/lakechamplain/index.html 

http://www.lc...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Walker

1,408 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,408
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Walker

  1. 1.   2010        Lake Champlain  Saving the Lake    What part can Plattsburg NY and Burlington VT play in reducing phosphorus  concentrations in Lake Champlain    Charles N. Walker  Being Green Pays  2/15/2010 
  2. 2. Lake Champlain 2    What is the major cause of the blue‐green algae blooms and what impact do they  have on Lake Champlain?  The biggest cause of algae blooms in Lack Champlain comes from an excess of phosphorus entering the  lake. Phosphorus is an essential nutrient in a plant or animal’s growth. The problem occurs when more  phosphorus than those plants and organisms need ends up in the Lake, disturbing the delicate nutrient  balance that exists. Phosphorus stimulates growth, so when too much of it ends up in the lake some  plants and algae grow too quickly and thickly. In turn the overabundance of these plants then absorb  much of the oxygen and sunlight needed by fish and plants below the surface waters. Additionally the  ultimate decomposition or these plants creates a toxic environment for other organism. As a result the  Lake's normal ecosystem is dramatically altered. In addition, algal blooms are also a major deterrent to  human enjoyment of the Lake as the murky green, sometimes smelly water is less than inviting for  swimming, fishing and boating.  The continued pollution of the lake will inevitably have a negative impact on the region's economy.  A closed beach not only can ruin an afternoon, it can have a disastrous effect on housing values and  chase away tourist dollars. Who wants to buy a house near a beach they can never swim in? Who is  going to come back to a lakefront hotel whose main attraction could make them sick? One study has  estimated the frequent algae blooms in St. Alban's Bay have lowered property values by 20 percent.  The excess phosphorus that is not used by aquatic organisms will eventually reach the ocean  causing the same kinds of issues at sea. Furthermore any excess phosphorus at this point becomes  locked in the sediment on the oceans floor and is lost from the terrestrial phosphorus cycle and  from further human use. This causes a greater demand on obtaining phosphorus from strip mining  operations.        Being Green Pays | Confidential   
  3. 3. Lake Champlain 3    Where is the excess Phosphorus coming from?  Phosphorus comes from what is called point and non point source pollution. Wastewater treatment or  industrial discharges are examples of point source pollution. In point source pollution the source of the  problem is localized and easily identifiable. This type of pollution produced about 20% of the excess  phosphorus in the Lake. As a result of reduction efforts, now less than 10% of the phosphorus in the  Lake comes from point sources.  Non point source pollution contributes the rest of the Lake's excess phosphorus. Non point source  pollution is more dispersed, coming from runoff from roads, farm fields, septic system effluent, and  residential lawns that have been fertilized with a high phosphorus fertilizer. Acre‐for‐acre, urban  development is the primary contributor of phosphorus into the Lake. Rain water and snow melt washes  over parking lots, roads, strip malls, big box stores, rooftops and lawns, and flows directly into the Lake  and its tributaries. This polluted stormwater runoff is the biggest contributor of phosphorus to the  widest, central part of the Lake – 44 metric tons per year pour into this part of Lake Champlain.  Urbanization has other negative impacts, including physical changes to river systems and other natural  filters such as wetlands. On average, urban and suburban land contributes up to four times the  phosphorus per unit area than either agricultural or forested land. Although it only constitutes 5% of the  land use, it is estimated to contribute about 46% of the phosphorus! Development increases the amount  of impervious area (e.g. roof tops and pavement) in a watershed, which interferes with the natural  filtering ability of soils. The quantity of runoff also increases because the soils can no longer absorb and  store rain and snowmelt. Suburban and rural residential areas, commercial developments, industries,  and roads all contribute phosphorus. Activities such as washing cars on roads and driveways, not  cleaning up pet waste, over‐fertilizing lawns and gardens, can all contribute to nonpoint source  phosphorus. Because it is widely dispersed, this type of phosphorus pollution is more difficult to control.        Being Green Pays | Confidential   
  4. 4. Lake Champlain 4    What are some challenges to reducing Phosphorus pollution?  One of the biggest hurdles to reducing phosphorus in Lake Champlain is financing. Towns and cities fear  that by enforcing the laws currently in place, they will lose development‐related jobs and taxes.  However considering that Lake Champlain related activities generate approximately 1.5 billion dollars  per year for Vermont alone it seems that losing this revenue would hurt much more in the long run. The  cost of cleaning up the lake and keeping it clean is much less than one year of Lake generated revenue.  Another challenge is changing the way Americans look at their transportation options. Because of the  way communities have developed over the past 60 years Americans have become more reliant on  privately owned vehicles. There are no easy answers to this challenge. However, by developing better  public transportation options and designing communities so most everywhere the residents need to go  is within easy walking distance, people will be less dependent on their automobiles. As people start to  walk, ride bikes or use public transportation more we will see a reduction in pollution and pollution  related issues.        Being Green Pays | Confidential   
  5. 5. Lake Champlain 5    What are some measures that have been made to reduce Phosphorus counts n  Lake Champlain?  Numerous actions have been taken to reduce phosphorus pollution in the Lake. Many farmers have  instituted best management practices (BMP’s).These include nutrient and waste management. Manure  is stored in pits until it is ready to be spread as fertilizer for the fields. Manure is no longer spread on the  fields during the winter. Spreading manure must wait until after the snow melts and the ground thaws in  the spring so that raw manure used by the farmer as fertilizer will not wash off and flow directly into the  streams, rivers and finally Lake Champlain. Another BMP is to plant a buffer of riparian plants between  farm fields and the stream or river banks that abut them so that the plants can help filter out the excess  phosphorus from the fields before it enters the water. Other programs address the problem of reducing  phosphorus runoff from lawns and roads in developed areas    On August 26th, 2002 Vermont and Quebec signed the Missisquoi Bay Phosphorus Reduction  Agreement pledging to reduce approximately 98 metric tons of phosphorus per year, 60% in Vermont  and 40% in Quebec. This will be done through such measures as upgrading our wastewater treatment  plants, best management practices, stabilization of stream banks and channels, improving storm water  management, and controlling erosion. Prior to the agreement, the Lake Champlain Basin Program  succeeded in reducing phosphorus loads by about 38.8 metric tons per year in 2001, exceeding their  goal  Some other measures:  • Boat holding tank laws to make dumping boat waste illegal on the lake.  • Monitoring programs to gauge trends in water quality.  • Stringent standards of phosphorus removal for Lake Champlain wastewater treatment plants  • The Don’t P on Your Lawn campaign – an educational outreach effort to reduce unnecessary  application of phosphorus lawn fertilizer.        Being Green Pays | Confidential   
  6. 6. Lake Champlain 6    What are some steps that the leaders of Plattsburg and Burlington can do to  help?  • Educate yourselves – Understand the impact pollution has on the quality of life in the Lake  Champlain Basin is the first step in making plans for a better future for the lake.  • Make informing the public a priority – The general public needs to understand the implications  of apathy and inaction to the welfare of the lake  • Get the public involved – The public needs to be involved in the whole process from planning to  implementation .This will go a long way towards making this region a better place to live.  • Put into action BMP – Best Management Practices are essential to mitigating pollution of the  lake’s ecosystem. Some of the ways to do this include creating stream buffers, enforcing erosion  control at construction sites, implementing incentives for adding green roofs to existing  buildings, and maximizing the use of pervious surfaces.  • Break the public’s overreliance on privet transportation – One of the best ways to fight non‐ point source pollution is by providing people with better alternatives to driving everywhere.  Making communities pedestrian friendly, and having public transportation that people will use,  • Lead by example – It will be much harder to convince the people of the Lake Champlain Basin to  make changes to their lives if their elected officials do not practice what they preach. Make the  effort to live a more sustainable lifestyle.  • Bring your county and state governments to the table – Don’t try to make all these changes  alone. These challenges are facing all communities in America. You are in a position to make a  difference beyond the city limits of Plattsburg and Burlington.        Being Green Pays | Confidential   
  7. 7. Lake Cha amplain 7    In conclusio on  rative that we It is imper e take steps n now to improve the health h of Lake Chammplain. The lo onger we wait the  more expensive the cle eanup proces ss will be and the longer it will take. Fur rthermore, thhe more pollu uted  the lake bbecomes the m more revenue e will be lost. The steps taken to improve the health h of Lake  Champlain will have th he added benefits of attrac cting more peeople to the aarea as both t tourists and full  time residdents. A revita alized, health hy lake can on nly add to the e region’s eco onomic well being.  Furthermore, by makin ng the environment a priority in civic pl lanning the re esidents of th he Lake Cham mplain  Basin will have healthier living condditions, needing less sick time and spend less on med dical bills.  su ustaina able  hea althy  healthy lak ke de evelopmment econ nomy       Being Green n Pays | Confidential   
  8. 8. Lake Champlain 8    Here are some useful graphs    Being Green Pays | Confidential   
  9. 9. Lake Champlain 9      Being Green Pays | Confidential   
  10. 10. Lake Champlain 10    References  http://www.clf.org/work/CWHF/lakechamplain/index.html  http://www.lcbp.org/index.htm  http://www.lakechamplaincommittee.org/lcc‐at‐work/phosphorus‐pollution‐in‐lake/  http://www.lclt.org/Phosphorus.htm    Being Green Pays | Confidential   

×