Supplemental
  Lighting
Why Supplemental Lighting?
   During winter light intensity suboptimal
   Previous methods discussed not enough
   Crop...
Lamp Types
   Incandescent
   Fluorescent
   HID
    – High pressure mercury
    – Metal-halide
    – Low pressure sodi...
Incandescent Lamps
   Poor light quality
   High heat load
   Low efficiency (7%)
   Too much light in Red
    Far red...
Fluorescent Lamps
    Commonly used over
     small growing areas
     (germination)
    Rare for finishing crops
    M...
HID/High Pressure Mercury-Type
   Mostly replaced by Metal Halide lamps
   Similar spectrum to fluorescent lights
   13...
HID/Metal-halide type
   Up to 2000 W
   20% efficiency
   More expensive than Mercury types, and
    have a shorter life
HID/ Low Pressure Sodium
 Very narrow band at 589 nm
 Little in the 700-850 nm range
 Low level of blue lights
 Some s...
HID/ High Pressure Sodium
 Life expectancy of up to 24,000 hours (2.75
  years)
 Cheaper to purchase
 Better spectrum t...
http://aesop.rutgers.edu/~horteng/images/fhgreenhouse/HPS_lamp_in_GH.jpg
Supplemental Lighting
 Already common above 40ºN latitude in U.S. and
  50ºN latitude in EU
 Gaining popularity in south...
Other Notes:
 Use only horticultural fixtures – reflectors
  important
 Reflectors for different locations in the
  gree...
Supplemental Lighting
Supplemental Lighting
Supplemental Lighting
Supplemental Lighting
Supplemental Lighting
Supplemental Lighting
Supplemental Lighting
Supplemental Lighting
Supplemental Lighting
Supplemental Lighting
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Supplemental Lighting

2,173 views

Published on

Brief review of supplemental lighting in the greenhouse.

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,173
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,009
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Supplemental Lighting

  1. 1. Supplemental Lighting
  2. 2. Why Supplemental Lighting?  During winter light intensity suboptimal  Previous methods discussed not enough  Crop growth slows down  Blindness increases  Flower size is smaller  Stems thinner  Plants often too tall.
  3. 3. Lamp Types  Incandescent  Fluorescent  HID – High pressure mercury – Metal-halide – Low pressure sodium – High pressure sodium
  4. 4. Incandescent Lamps  Poor light quality  High heat load  Low efficiency (7%)  Too much light in Red Far red range
  5. 5. Fluorescent Lamps  Commonly used over small growing areas (germination)  Rare for finishing crops  More efficient (20%)  Low wattage, so you need a lot of them (shadow creation)
  6. 6. HID/High Pressure Mercury-Type  Mostly replaced by Metal Halide lamps  Similar spectrum to fluorescent lights  13% efficiency  Up to 1000 W; can last over 10,000 hours  Also used to light roadways
  7. 7. HID/Metal-halide type  Up to 2000 W  20% efficiency  More expensive than Mercury types, and have a shorter life
  8. 8. HID/ Low Pressure Sodium  Very narrow band at 589 nm  Little in the 700-850 nm range  Low level of blue lights  Some success in combining with incandescents  In Northern areas can affect leaf morphology  Large reflectors cause shadows
  9. 9. HID/ High Pressure Sodium  Life expectancy of up to 24,000 hours (2.75 years)  Cheaper to purchase  Better spectrum than LPS  Most common worldwide today  25% efficiency !!  For some crops extended light spectrum results in increased fresh weight, stem elongation, and early flowering.
  10. 10. http://aesop.rutgers.edu/~horteng/images/fhgreenhouse/HPS_lamp_in_GH.jpg
  11. 11. Supplemental Lighting  Already common above 40ºN latitude in U.S. and 50ºN latitude in EU  Gaining popularity in south  Especially profitable in winter months  Cost about $2.90/ft2 of growing space (HPS)  Chrysanthemum, geranium, begonia, rose, and plugs  300 – 600 fc for ornamentals 600-1000 fc for vegetable crops
  12. 12. Other Notes:  Use only horticultural fixtures – reflectors important  Reflectors for different locations in the greenhouse  Usually 16-18 photoperiod used  Higher plant densities are more economic.

×