Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Designing micro-learning for the workplace

639 views

Published on

Sharing at Institute for Adult Learning, Adult Education Network,
Special Interest Group (Instructional Design) in Nov 2015

Published in: Education

Designing micro-learning for the workplace

  1. 1. Design Micro‐learning  for the Workplace Institute for Adult Learning Adult Education Network Special Interest Group (Instructional Design)  Tang Buay Choo bchootang@outlook.sg Ho Mee Yin
  2. 2. Recap • What is Micro‐learning? • When to use Micro‐learning? • Pull or Push 
  3. 3. What is micro‐learning? "Microlearning deals with relatively small learning units and  short‐term learning activities"  (Amit Garg, 2009)  "Sharing byte‐sized processes to help others learn from their  experiences"  (Stephen Downes, 2009) ”  “Supports repetitive learning through embedding the learning  process into daily routines by making use of communication  devices” (Theo Hug, Innsbruck, 2005)
  4. 4. Micro‐learning at workplace • Performance support / Job aid • Review /revision for tasks e.g. those that are performed only once in a  while • Deliver updates (e.g. price changes, new product features, or anything  that requires regular updates) • Complement formal learning (e.g. Blended learning) • Paced competence/knowledge acquisition – breaking a large  competence / knowledge into smaller chunks  Some possible uses When to Use micro‐learning?
  5. 5. Structure of Micro‐learning  Pull ApproachPull ApproachPush ApproachPush Approach
  6. 6. Design “Pull” micro‐learning  • About Knowledge, Memory and Learning  • Design elements of “Pull” micro‐learning • Design structure of “Pull” micro‐learning
  7. 7. • Knowledge is inherently functional and situated. Learning occurs and  is meaningful only when the new information is applied in carrying  out task at work or in everyday life. • Human memory is a collection of thousands of stories we remember  through experience • Learning involves Reminding and Expectation Failure (Scripts) • Learning is complete only when the new information is transferred to  the long term memory from the working memory • Our working memory has limited capacity • Emotion and memory – we remember emotional charged events  better • Practice is essential to learning. Multiple Distributed Practice is more  effective than single concentrated practice at the end of learning • Learning involves observing, “imitating” and from more abled others About Knowledge, Memory and Learning  – some research‐based principles
  8. 8. • Experience (working on real world task)  • Stories  • As trigger for Pull Learning • As learning / performance strategy support • Conversations • As trigger for Pull learning • In the form of discussions, and peer critique/feedback • Access to experts  ‐ One‐on‐one mentoring  • Social/Community learning or collaborative performance • Learning Resources / Information Support • Practice Design elements of “Pull” micro‐learning
  9. 9. Design structure of “Pull” micro‐learning (1) Practice Workplace Task (Experience)Workplace Task (Experience) Social/Community  learning or collaborative  performance Stories Access to experts (one‐on‐one Mentoring) Conversations – discussions &/or peer  critique/ feedback Learning Resources /  Information Support Conversations Trigger Learn Stories (as learning /  performance strategy  support) Support for Learning & Performances
  10. 10. Design structure of “Pull” Micro‐learning (2) Practice Workplace Task (Experience)Workplace Task (Experience) Social/Community  learning or collaborative  performance Stories Access to experts (one‐on‐one Mentoring) Conversations – discussions &/or peer  critique /feedback Learning Resources /  Information Support Conversations Trigger Learn Stories (as learning /  performance strategy  support) Support for Learning & Performance PracticeLearn Micro‐learning (1) Micro‐learning (n) Support for Learning &  Performance
  11. 11. Background of the micro‐learning  Workplace:  A training provider of WSQ qualifications Target audience of the micro‐learning:  Full‐time Curriculum Developers who  have responsibility in developing the  training curricula and checking the  training curricula developed by freelance  developers engaged by the company Focus of the micro‐learning Equip full time Curriculum Developers  with the competences to ensure: • Learning objectives are well‐written;  and  • Lessons are well‐structured to promote  effective learning. Design “Pull” micro‐learning – a possible example Story: A scenario that sets out the possible work  situation that requires the performance of the  competences, and providing an appreciation of the  desired standard of performance Workplace Task (Experience)Workplace Task (Experience) Learning Resources / Information Support 1. Characteristics of a well‐written  learning objective? (15 to 25 mins) http://create.lensoo.com/watch/b6D7 2. Common pitfalls when  writing learning objectives Access to experts (one‐on‐one Mentoring) • Select at least 3 well‐written and 3 not well‐written  learning objectives (either previously written by self or by  freelancer). For the not well‐written ones, indicate what is  wrong and suggested corrections. • Share with & get feedback from a Senior Curriculum  Developer (serving as Mentors for this micro‐learning) 
  12. 12. Background of the micro‐learning  Workplace:  A training provider of WSQ qualifications Target audience of the micro‐learning:  Full‐time Curriculum Developers who  have responsibility in developing the  training curricula and checking the  training curricula developed by freelance  developers engaged by the company Focus of the micro‐learning Equip full time Curriculum Developers  with the competences to ensure: • Learning objectives are well‐written;  and  • Lessons are well‐structured to promote  effective learning. Design “Pull” micro‐learning – a possible example Story: A scenario that sets out the possible work  situation that requires the performance of the  competences, and providing an appreciation of the  desired standard of performance Workplace Task (Experience)Workplace Task (Experience) Learning Resources / Information Support Instructional events that should be  present in a lesson to  • support students internal processing  of the new content;  • allow students to apply their learning;  and • promote students'retention/transfer  of learning [Gagne's Nine Events of Instruction]  ‐ 15 to 25 mins https://prezi.com/t69vqcs4ejkm/ Social / Community learning • Go to the shared folder “xxx”. This folder contains past  “problem” lesson plans developed by our freelancers, and  the suggested enhancements made by our colleagues. • Study at least 3 of them to identify the nature of the  problem – Learning objectives & Structure, and learn from  the suggestions for enhancements • Seek clarifications from the contributors, if needed.
  13. 13. Background of the micro‐learning  Workplace:  A training provider of WSQ qualifications Target audience of the micro‐learning:  Full‐time Curriculum Developers who  have responsibility in developing the  training curricula and checking the  training curricula developed by freelance  developers engaged by the company Focus of the micro‐learning Equip full time Curriculum Developers  with the competences to ensure: • Learning objectives are well‐written;  and  • Lessons are well‐structured to promote  effective learning. Design “Pull” micro‐learning – a possible example Story: A scenario that sets out the possible work  situation that requires the performance of the  competences, and providing an appreciation of the  desired standard of performance Workplace Task (Experience)Workplace Task (Experience) Learning Resources / Information Support Instructional events that should be  present in a lesson to  • support students internal processing  of the new content;  • allow students to apply their learning;  and • promote students'retention/transfer  of learning [Gagne's Nine Events of Instruction]  ‐ 15 to 25 mins https://prezi.com/t69vqcs4ejkm/ Conversations – peer critique /feedback • Select a past lesson plan with problems in the learning  objectives & structure. Suggest enhancements. • Exchange with your partner for this micro‐learning. Provide  feedback to each other on the suggestions & revise if needed • Consult your Mentor for further feedback. Upload finalised  suggestions to Folder xxx to share with others. Access to experts (one‐on‐one Mentoring)
  14. 14. • Centred around a Workplace Task  • Learning extended into / integrated with workflow  (workplace process) • Simulate typical “everyday” learning at the workplace Design “Pull” micro‐learning –key “success” features Further readings on: • Learning extended into the workflow – Charles Jennings’ 70 20 10  Framework • “Everyday” Learning at the workplace – Jane Hart’s Everyday  Workplace Learning
  15. 15. Design “Pull” Micro‐learning • Participants work in groups to design a micro‐learning Activity:

×