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2
On behalf of Born This Way
Foundation, Benenson Strategy
Group conducted 401 online
interviews with 13-24 year olds in
t...
3
Snapshot
4
Prioritization of
Mental Health
Somewhat
important priority
Very important
priority
Frequency of
Discussing Men...
Snapshot
*
5
Somewhat
important priority
Very important
priority
Somewhat
important priority
Very important
priority
LGBTQ...
6
Ages 18-24Ages 13-17Overall
Mental Health Behavior of Las Vegas Youth
7
How much of a priority is your mental health to yo...
Friends
Parents/guardians
Romantic partner
Therapist or mental health professional
Trusted adult
Religious leader
Online c...
Mental Health Behavior of Las Vegas Youth
9
It's important to talk to someone
It makes me feel better
I get depressed, sad...
You feel suicidalYou are worried
about your own
substance use
You feel depressedYou feel like harming
yourself
You feel an...
Three-quarters of young people say they spend several hours a week helping the people in their lives. They cite the good
f...
12
Mental Health Resource Access in Las Vegas
13
Do young people in your city have access to the resources they need to suppo...
Mental Health Resource Access in Las Vegas
Most young people in Las Vegas don’t think they have access to the mental healt...
Health insurance that covers mental health care
University campus mental health resources ³
Community centers with counsel...
16
Youth Mental Health Resource Preferences in Las Vegas
Young people in Las Vegas are open to a wide range of mental health ...
Youth Mental Health Resource Preferences in Las Vegas
There is high demand for mental health resources that teach the copi...
Youth Mental Health Resource Preferences in Las Vegas
The qualities Las Vegas young people seek in mental health resources...
In-person Online Over text or instant
message
Over the phone Equally comfortable
with any of these
resources
Overall 13-17...
21
LGBTQ+ youth in Las Vegas are more susceptible to emotional and mental health challenges than their non-
LGBTQ+ peers, rep...
You feel suicidalYou are worried
about your own
substance use
You feel depressedYou feel like harming
yourself
You feel an...
I am in a community
where most people
are kind to me
I am in a community
where most people are neither
kind nor unkind to ...
LGBTQ+ Youth in Las Vegas
25
% Very Comfortable
Using Resource
In-personLGBTQ+
% Say Resource
Definitely Available
Digital...
In-person Online Over text or instant
message
Over the phone Equally comfortable
with any of these
resources
Compared to t...
Youth Mental Health in Las Vegas: Understanding Resource Availability and Preferences
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Youth Mental Health in Las Vegas: Understanding Resource Availability and Preferences

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On behalf of Born This Way Foundation, Benenson Strategy Group conducted 401 online interviews with 13-24 year olds in the Las Vegas metropolitan area from December 12, 2018 to January 3, 2019.

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Youth Mental Health in Las Vegas: Understanding Resource Availability and Preferences

  1. 1. 2 On behalf of Born This Way Foundation, Benenson Strategy Group conducted 401 online interviews with 13-24 year olds in the Las Vegas metropolitan area from December 12th 2018 to January 3rd 2019. • The margin of error for the entire data set is ±4.84% at the 95% confidence level. • Note: the margin of error is higher among subgroups • Due to rounding, answer choices may not always add up to 100%. • Questions asked only of relevant groups: Online Interviews ¹ Military: Asked of those who have served or have had a family member serve in the U.S. military ² School student: Asked of those who are currently in middle or high school ³ University student: Asked of those who are currently in college ⁴ Employed: Asked of those who are currently employed ⁵ Relationship: Asked of those who are currently married or in a long-term relationship
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  3. 3. Snapshot 4 Prioritization of Mental Health Somewhat important priority Very important priority Frequency of Discussing Mental Health with Anyone Often Sometimes Rarely/never Talk About Mental Health With… Resource Accessibility All of the time Most of the time Rarely/never Parent/Guardian Friend “Do young people in your city have access to mental health resources…?” Overall, young people in the Las Vegas area believe mental health is an important priority that should be addressed on an ongoing basis. However, most say they “rarely” or “never” talk about it and more than one in four say that young people in the city don’t have access to the resources they need to handle serious mental health challenges such as suicide, bullying, sexual assault, and online harassment. The unawareness of resource access is particularly worrying given that many reported feeling anxious, helpless or sad, or fearful frequently in the past month. ALL YOUNG PEOPLE Anxious Fearful Helpless or sad Best Way to Work on Mental Health …when you face a specific challenge …on an ongoing basis …not possible to ‘work on’ like your physical health % who felt this way a good bit of the time or more during the past month… Felt Frequently in the Past Month Feel They Don’t Have Access to the Mental Health Resources to Deal with… Suicide Bullying Sexual Assault Online Harassment
  4. 4. Snapshot * 5 Somewhat important priority Very important priority Somewhat important priority Very important priority LGBTQ+ Often Sometimes Rarely/never Often Sometimes Rarely/never All of the time Most of the time Rarely/never All of the time Most of the time Rarely/never Although LGBTQ+ and non-LGBTQ+ young people in Las Vegas both say mental health is an important priority, the strength of their conviction differs, with non-LGBTQ+ youth more likely to call it “very important.” While LGBTQ+ youth discuss mental health more often than their non-LGBTQ+ peers, they also say mental health resources are less accessible. The most striking difference between these groups is who they turn to when they want to talk about mental health, with LGBTQ+ youth reporting that they would be much less likely to discuss the subject with a parent/guardian than their non-LGBTQ+ peers. Prioritization of Mental Health Frequency of Discussing Mental Health with Anyone Resource Accessibility “Do young people in your city have access to mental health resources…?” NON-LGBTQ+ Anxious Fearful Helpless or sad Anxious Fearful Helpless or sad % who felt this way a good bit of the time or more during the past month… Felt frequently in the past month Talk About Mental Health With Parent/Guardian Friend Parent/Guardian Friend
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  6. 6. Ages 18-24Ages 13-17Overall Mental Health Behavior of Las Vegas Youth 7 How much of a priority is your mental health to you? Somewhat of a priority A very important priority Net 1-3 Net 4-7 Net 8-10 Mental Health Physical Health 13-17 year olds 18-24 year olds Overall % Rate Mental Health or Physical Health Where 1 means “poor” and 10 means “excellent” Mental Health Physical Health Mental Health Physical Health Mental and physical health go hand-in-hand, with young people saying their mental health is as much of an important priority as their physical well being. And yet, despite prioritizing both, young people in Las Vegas don’t feel that positive about their overall health, physical or mental. Over half of all young people rate their health as “average” or even “poor,” and those 18-24 are inclined to rate their physical and mental health at even lower levels.
  7. 7. Friends Parents/guardians Romantic partner Therapist or mental health professional Trusted adult Religious leader Online chat-based helpline Teacher/school staff member/counselor ² Phone line Text line College/university official or staff ³ Mental Health Behavior of Las Vegas Youth 8 It's not possible to 'work on' your mental health in the same way you can 'work on’ your physical health. It’s more helpful to work on your mental health on an ongoing basis. It’s more helpful to work on your mental health when you face a specific challenge. Which statement comes closest to your view about mental health? Overall How often do you discuss mental health? 13-17 18-24 Rarely or never Sometimes Often With whom do you discuss mental health? Asked among those who discuss mental health Young people in Las Vegas agree: good mental health requires a proactive, ongoing effort. And yet most – especially those of high school age – rarely, if ever, discuss mental health with anyone. Those who do discuss it are more likely to turn to a friend rather than a parent/guardian or a mental health professional.
  8. 8. Mental Health Behavior of Las Vegas Youth 9 It's important to talk to someone It makes me feel better I get depressed, sad, anxious, stressed To keep poor mental health from escalating To get some feedback or advice To see if others are having similar issues I've had mental health issues in the past People around me need to know how I feel To hear a positive attitude “I discuss my mental health to accept it and move on quicker. It’s better to not push away the problem. I wanna feel open and free to talk to those around me.” - Female, 21-24 “I know I need help with my mental health issues, but I don’t know what kind of help I need. So I usually ask for advice or ideas for how I can help better take care of myself.” - Female, 21-24 “I talk about mental health to keep a better peace of mind and clarity to address toxic issues head on.” - Male, 18-20 “It’s important to let everyone know what I’m feeling. Instead of leaving them clueless, so they get a feel of what I’m going through. It makes them more understanding.” - Male, 21-24 What is the main reason you discuss your mental health? Asked among those who discuss mental health (Open-end question) Young people in Las Vegas say good mental health begins by talking about it. In sharing how they feel with the people in their communities, young people are able to get the critical support they need to help mitigate their anxieties before they escalate beyond their control.
  9. 9. You feel suicidalYou are worried about your own substance use You feel depressedYou feel like harming yourself You feel angry or violent You were sexually assaulted Mental Health Behavior of Las Vegas Youth 10 % Turn to Each to Talk about Specific Situations You feel unsafe at homeYou're worried about your friend's substance use You feel harassed or unsafe online You feel unsafe at school or work ⁴ You're being physically bullied When confronted by many of life’s challenges, Las Vegas young people tend to turn most commonly to their family, and then friend networks… …though on particularly sensitive issues such as assault, self-harm, or personal substance abuse, many would also consider turning to a professional mental health expert for support. Family Friends Therapist
  10. 10. Three-quarters of young people say they spend several hours a week helping the people in their lives. They cite the good feeling that giving back gives them as their primary motivation. Many young people say giving back also helps them grow, find friends, and feel better when they are down. Importantly, the young people who give back more to their community show stronger mental health than those who give back less. A majority of young people (52%) who rate their mental health as strong (8-10 out of 10) spend an hour a day or more helping the people in their lives, while those who rate their mental health as less strong (1-7 out of 10) tend to spend less time helping the people in their lives. 11 On average, how much time do you spend helping the people in your life? How does helping the people in your life make you feel? Makes me feel good to give back Gives me a way to help others Gives me an opportunity for personal growth Makes me feel better when I'm feeling down Gives me an opportunity to meet new friends Lets me put my skills to good use Teaches me new skills Makes me feel connected to my community Lets me explore new interests Mental Health Behavior of Las Vegas Youth More than anything, they give back because it makes them feel good to help others in their lives. By further offering Las Vegas youth opportunities to help others in their community, both individuals and communities at-large stand to benefit. Youth Who Rate Their Mental Health 1-7/10 Youth Who Rate Their Mental Health 8-10/10 All Las Vegas Youth An hour a day or more Few hours a week Few hours a month Few hours a year Less often
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  12. 12. Mental Health Resource Access in Las Vegas 13 Do young people in your city have access to the resources they need to support their mental wellness or to address a mental health issue? All the time Most of the time Rarely/Never My city can't afford good mental health resources Mental health resources aren't available in my city The resources that are available aren't helpful There are no resources that I trust Elected officials in my city don't care about investing in mental health resources There are mental health resources that exist, but I can't access them Mental health issues are stigmatized in my community People can't afford the cost of mental health resources People don't know where to go for mental health resources What in your view is preventing young people in your city from using resources to support mental health? Among those who say they don’t have access to resources all of the time Nearly a third of all young people say that they rarely or never have access to the resources needed to support positive mental health. Information and cost are the main obstacles preventing access to mental health resources. And while far fewer see stigmatization surrounding mental health as preventing young people from accessing mental health resources, this is still a barrier for 1-in-5 young people in the Las Vegas area.
  13. 13. Mental Health Resource Access in Las Vegas Most young people in Las Vegas don’t think they have access to the mental health resources they need when feeling bad or disappointed in themselves or feeling concerned about others. Alarmingly, most say they would not have the resources to deal with feeling unsafe, being assaulted, or with issues surrounding their own substance use. 14 You feel disappointed with a grade ² ³ You feel depressed You feel anxious You feel angry or violent You feel suicidal You feel bad about how you look You feel disappointed with how you're doing at work ⁴ You feel like harming yourself Your friend has suddenly stopped talking to you You are being physically bullied You are worried about your own substance use You were sexually assaulted You feel unsafe at school or work ² ³ ⁴ You feel unsafe at home Definitely Yes Probably Yes Probably No Definitely No If you faced each situation, would you have the resources to deal with it?
  14. 14. Health insurance that covers mental health care University campus mental health resources ³ Community centers with counsellors to talk to Therapists or mental health experts School guidance counselors or mental health experts ² 15 % Believe Following Resources Are Definitely Available in Their Community Mental health counseling by online video chats Mental health counseling by a text line or phone line A mental health first aid course Classes that teach skills to support mental wellness HR representatives or other work-based resources ⁴ Mental health resources for those who have served in the military ¹ Religious groups or centers that offer counselling Support groups for people struggling with issues such as addiction Mental Health Resource Access in Las Vegas When asked about specifics, most are unsure if they have access to essential mental health resources. Only around a third think most of the resources traditionally relied on to support mental health are definitely available to young people in their community. Despite this generation’s reputation for being tech-savvy and dependent, with the exception of online forums or websites, fewer than 1-in-3 are aware of other digital resources such as apps or text lines dedicated to supporting positive mental health. For most resources there is hardly any age gap on awareness, but just 26% of 13-17 year olds say online forums or websites to support their mental health are definitely available to them compared to 38% of 18-24 year olds. Awareness of mental health resources is most blurry when it comes to accessibility of the resources that are designed to support a specific group or mental health challenge, or those designed to proactively teach skills through workshops or classes. Mental health counseling by online video chats Mental health counseling by a text or phone Apps or online support groups Online forums or websites
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  16. 16. Youth Mental Health Resource Preferences in Las Vegas Young people in Las Vegas are open to a wide range of mental health resources, both in-person and online. Encouragingly, over 60% are enthusiastic about proactive resources such as mental health first aid courses or general mental wellness classes, reiterating a commitment to equipping themselves with the skills they need to help support positive mental health in themselves and within their communities. 17 % Comfortable Using the Following Mental Health Resources Mental health counseling by online video chats Religious groups or centers that offer counseling HR representatives or work-based resources ⁴ Mental health counseling by a text line or phone line Mental health resources for those who’ve served in military ¹ Support groups for specific issues Community centers with counsellors Online forums or websites about mental health A mental health first aid course Apps or online support groups Guidance counselors or mental health experts at school ² Classes that teach skills to support mental wellness ² ³ Therapists or mental health experts Campus mental health resources ³ Health insurance that covers mental health care
  17. 17. Youth Mental Health Resource Preferences in Las Vegas There is high demand for mental health resources that teach the coping mechanisms that help young people address stress points across all parts of their daily life, as well as in their academic, professional, family, and romantic lives. 18 % Agree with Following Statements I want to learn coping skills and tools to help me deal with the stresses of everyday life to support my mental health. I want to learn coping skills and tools to help me deal with the stresses of family life to support my mental health. I want to learn coping skills and tools to help me deal with the stresses of work life to support my mental health.⁴ I want to learn coping skills and tools to help me deal with the stresses of romantic relationships to support my mental health.⁵ I want to learn coping skills and tools to help me deal with the stresses of school life to support my mental health.² ³
  18. 18. Youth Mental Health Resource Preferences in Las Vegas The qualities Las Vegas young people seek in mental health resources are simple: they are looking to connect with someone who understands what they are going through in a judgement-free zone. While some indicate they value a professional opinion above all else, many say peer participation is what would make them most comfortable. 19 Top Mental Health Resource Qualities that Increase Likelihood of Use (Open-ended question) Digital resource (text, online, app) Affordable Professional counseling Open and comfortable atmosphere Kind, trustworthy and supportitve confidants “[Mental health resources] should have a feature to be able to talk to people that experience the same feelings. Not exactly talking to a therapist, but with people that I can relate to.” - Female, 13-17 “Designed for people around my age.” - Female, 18-20 “Something more personal like speaking with a therapist one- on-one or speaking with friends.” – Male, 13-17 “Made for people to talk to who have been through the same things as you.” - Female, 18-20 “[Feel like] it relates to someone my age.” - Male, 13-17 “A therapist that has gone through some things I’ve dealt with in life.” - Male, 20-24 What are the qualities a mental health resource could have that would make you more likely to use it? (Open-ended question)
  19. 19. In-person Online Over text or instant message Over the phone Equally comfortable with any of these resources Overall 13-17 18-24 White Latinx LGBTQ+ Non-LGBTQ+ Very Important Somewhat Important Youth Mental Health Resource Preferences in Las Vegas In thinking about the kinds of resources they’d most like to use, over half say they would be most comfortable using in-person resources, while more than a third say they would like digital resources. 20 When looking for resources to improve your mental health, you would be more comfortable turning to resources that are…? Importance of Anonymity in Finding and Using Mental Health Resources Anonymity is important but not in absolute terms. Across ages, races, and sexual orientations, large majorities say remaining anonymous on some level is important. However, young people are evenly split between just how important anonymity is to them when using mental health resources.
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  21. 21. LGBTQ+ youth in Las Vegas are more susceptible to emotional and mental health challenges than their non- LGBTQ+ peers, reporting significantly worse physical and mental health. LGBTQ+ young people also choose to discuss their mental health with different people in their lives. LGBTQ+ Youth in Las Vegas 22 With whom do you discuss mental health? Friends Parents/Guardians Romantic partner ⁵ Therapist or mental health professional Online chat-based helpline Teacher/school staff member/counselor ² Phone line Text line Frequency of Discussing Mental Health with Anyone Among LGBTQ+ Often Sometimes Rarely/ Never LGBTQ+ Non-LGBTQ+ LGBTQ+ % Rate Mental Health or Physical Health Where 1 means “poor” and 10 means “excellent” Non-LGBTQ+ Net 1-3 Net 4-7 Net 8-10 While LGBTQ+ and non-LGBTQ+ young people are equally likely to talk about their mental health with friends, just a third of LGBTQ+ young people would talk about it with their parents, compared to a majority of non- LGBTQ+ people. Instead, young LGBTQ+ are more likely to turn to digital resources and phone lines for these discussions.
  22. 22. You feel suicidalYou are worried about your own substance use You feel depressedYou feel like harming yourself You feel angry or violent You were sexually assaulted LGBTQ+ Youth in Las Vegas % Turn to Their Family to Talk about Each You feel unsafe at home You receive an unexpected medical diagnosis that worries you You are worried about your friend's substance use You feel harassed or unsafe online You feel unsafe at school or work ⁴ You are being physically bullied …and this gap persists for sensitive issues such as assault, self-harm, or personal substance abuse. 23 When compared to their non-LGBTQ+ peers, the young LGBTQ+ community in Las Vegas are not nearly as comfortable turning to their family for help in most situations, opting instead to confide in friends… LGBTQ+ Non-LGBTQ+
  23. 23. I am in a community where most people are kind to me I am in a community where most people are neither kind nor unkind to me I am in a community where most people are unkind to me LGBTQ+ Youth in Las Vegas 24 Loved Close to the people in my life Interested in socializing Optimistic Energized Useful Level-headed Helpless or sad Anxious Fearful PositiveFeelingsNegativeFeelings % Say They Have Felt Each for Most of the Past Month Their lower self-assessments of their own mental health, while heartbreaking, is unsurprising when you consider they are far less likely to feel “loved” or even “useful,” and more likely to feel “helpless or sad.” Contributing to these negative emotions, LGBTQ+ young people are also significantly less likely to say they live in a “kind community” than their non-LGBTQ+ peers. Thinking about your community, would you say…? LGBTQ+ Non-LGBTQ+ LGBTQ+ Non-LGBTQ+
  24. 24. LGBTQ+ Youth in Las Vegas 25 % Very Comfortable Using Resource In-personLGBTQ+ % Say Resource Definitely Available Digital A mental health first aid course Campus resources such as a counseling center or access to therapists ³ Community centers with counsellors Guidance counselors or mental health experts at school ² Mental health counseling by online video chats Mental health counseling by a text line or phone line Apps or online support groups Online forums or other websites where I can talk about my mental health An LGBTQ+ center While their self-evaluations suggest they are in greater need of mental health resources, young LGBTQ+ in Las Vegas are less aware of the mental health resources at their disposal. The relatively high comfort with turning to an LGBTQ+ center speaks to how important it is that providers communicate that they are welcoming to LGBTQ+ youth. LGBTQ+ Non-LGBTQ+
  25. 25. In-person Online Over text or instant message Over the phone Equally comfortable with any of these resources Compared to their non-LGBTQ+ peers, LGBTQ+ young people in Las Vegas are more drawn to mental health resources that let them connect with others remotely. They are also less drawn to in-person resources. 26 When looking for resources to improve your mental health, you would be more comfortable turning to resources that are…? Importance of Anonymity in Finding and Using Mental Health Resources However, when it comes to the importance of staying anonymous, there is only a marginal difference between LGBTQ+ and non-LGBTQ+ youth, suggesting the preference for digital resources may be more about being able to connect with people that it may be harder for them to find in everyday life (such as fellow LGBTQ+ people) than it is about protecting their identity. LGBTQ+ Youth in Las Vegas LGBTQ+ Non-LGBTQ+ Very important Somewhat important Not very important Not important at all LGBTQ+ Non-LGBTQ+

On behalf of Born This Way Foundation, Benenson Strategy Group conducted 401 online interviews with 13-24 year olds in the Las Vegas metropolitan area from December 12, 2018 to January 3, 2019.

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