0135118875 pp9

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0135118875 pp9

  1. 1. Chapter 9Managed Services
  2. 2. Learning Objectives  At the completion of this chapter you should be able to:  Outline the different managed services segments  Describe the five factors that distinguish managed services operations from commercial ones  Explain the need for and trends in elementary and secondary school foodserviceExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 2 All Rights Reserved.
  3. 3. Learning Objectives  At the completion of this chapter you should be able to:  Describe the complexities in college and university foodservice  Identify characteristics and trends in healthcare, business and industry, and leisure and recreation foodservicesExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 3 All Rights Reserved.
  4. 4. Elements of Managed Services  Airlines  Business & Industry  Military  Leisure &  Elementary & Recreations Secondary schools  Conference centers  Colleges &  Airports Universities  Travel Plazas  Healthcare facilities  National ParksExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 4 All Rights Reserved.
  5. 5. Traits of Managed Services Operations  Must meet the needs of both the guest and the client (institution)  Guests may not have alternative dining options  A “captive” clientele  Often housed in an organization that does not have foodservice as a primary businessExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 5 All Rights Reserved.
  6. 6. Traits of Managed Services Operations  Food is produced in batch quantities for service and consumption within fixed tie periods  Volume of business is more consistent  Easier to predict number of guests  Portions can be better controlled  Working hours may be betterExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 6 All Rights Reserved.
  7. 7. Airlines: In-Flight Foodservice  May provide meals from their own in-flight business or use a contractor  In-flight foodservice is a complex logistical operation  Food must be able to withstand a wide range of conditions  LSG Sky Chefs is the largest airline catering companyExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 7 All Rights Reserved.
  8. 8. Airlines: In-Flight Foodservice  In-flight foodservice managers must:  Plan menus  Develop product specifications  Arrange purchasing contracts  In-flight foodservice is an expense that must be controlled  As airlines decrease foodservice onboard, airport restaurants are becoming more prevalentExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 8 All Rights Reserved.
  9. 9. Military  Feeding military personnel includes feeding in:  Clubs  Dining halls  Military hospitals  In the fieldExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 9 All Rights Reserved.
  10. 10. Military  Foodservice sales exceed $6 billion annually  Trends include:  Contracting services for officers clubs  Moving from fine dining to casual  Mobile field kitchens  Prepared foods to heat and serve anywhere  Providing fast food restaurants on base instead of mess hallsExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 10 All Rights Reserved.
  11. 11. Elementary & Secondary Schools  In response to concern about malnutrition of military recruits in the 1940’s the National School Lunch Act was passed in 1946  The program was designed to provide stronger recruits for the military and use surplus food that farmers producedExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 11 All Rights Reserved.
  12. 12. Food PyramidExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 12 All Rights Reserved.
  13. 13. Elementary & Secondary Schools  The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) feeds nearly 30 million children annually  Federal funding is approximately $2.29 per meal per student  Focus on good nutrition  Potential market for fast food chains  Preparation and product varies among schools  Contract companies provide flexibilityExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 13 All Rights Reserved.
  14. 14. Colleges & Universities  Foodservice operations are complex and include:  Residence halls  Sports concessions  Conferences  Cafeterias/Student Unions  Faculty clubs  Convenience stores  CateringExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 14 All Rights Reserved.
  15. 15. Responsibilities in Managed Services  Responsibilities of the manager are often greater in small to mid-sized operations  Managers in larger operations often have staff to delegate tasks toExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 15 All Rights Reserved.
  16. 16. Responsibilities in Managed Services  Typical responsibilities include:  Employee relations  Human resources management  Financial and budgeting  Safety administration and budget  Sanitation/Foodborne illness prevention  Training and developmentExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 16 All Rights Reserved.
  17. 17. Colleges & Universities: Campus Dining  Campus dining is due to clientele living on campus and eating many of their meals there  Budgeting is easy because of payment plans  Daily Rate  Amount of money required per person to pay for foodserviceExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 17 All Rights Reserved.
  18. 18. Health Care Facilities  Health care managed services are provided to:  Hospital patients  Long-term care and assisted living residents  Visitors and employees  The service is given by tray, cafeteria, dining room, coffee shop, catering and vendingExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 18 All Rights Reserved.
  19. 19. Health Care Facilities  The main focus of hospital foodservice is the tray line  To increase cash sales and manage profitability, managers in health care operations have created multiple options such as:  Medical malls with retail pharmacies  Flower and gift shops  Boutiques  Retail bakeries  Coffee carts  Catering  RestaurantExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 19 All Rights Reserved.
  20. 20. Business & Industry (B&I)  Contractors account for approximately 80% of the B&I market  The B&I sector is approximately 30,000 units  To adjust to corporate downsizing and relocations, the B&I segment has offered foodservice in smaller units rather than full-sized cafeteriasExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 20 All Rights Reserved.
  21. 21. Leisure & Recreation  The segment is unique and fun because there are opportunities to be part of:  Professional sporting events  Concerts  Circuses  Other events held in stadiumsExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 21 All Rights Reserved.
  22. 22. Stadium Points of Service  Facilities often have several points of service where food and beverage are provided including:  Hot dog stands  Restaurants  In the stands  Superboxes, suites, and skyboxes  Souvenir standsExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 22 All Rights Reserved.
  23. 23. Trends  There are several trends in managed services which include:  Balancing rising costs with fewer dollars  Increased demand for food to go  Request for 24/7 foodservice  Increasing use of fresh productsExploring the Hospitality Industry, 2nd edition © 2012, 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.John R. Walker 23 All Rights Reserved.

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